Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

OT: sawdust in gearbox, really?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Not auto related, but similar - was told by a Polish welder that an unscrupulous horse trader would rub a hot pepper on a tired old horse's butthole to perk it up just before the sale negotiations.
    Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
    ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

    Comment


    • #17
      Having worked in a garage for a guy they affectionately called "Ray rust", sawdust was a staple. Not any old saw dust, hardwood sanding dust he got from a joinery shop making mahogany surrounds for Ali Windows, and he was no stranger to adding it to oil, he also used his favourite oil, neat steam oil, it was like treacle.
      Egg whites in radiators you name it, I remember being told to take an alternator off and resort it with satin black, it was ok, he just wanted to charge for a new one, I told the owner and hence became unemployed, thankfully.
      Chewed up tights were also added to gearboxes, silicone sealant to exhausts, though suprisingly that seemed to work very well.
      Nothing was sacred to him, what an arse
      Mark

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
        My favourite uncle was a alcoholic motorhead who taught me all the tricks when I was young. Sawdust to quiet a noisy rearend or transmission. A handful of hardwood ashes into the inspection plate on the bell housing to temporarily keep a clutch from slipping if the rear main seal in the engine was gone and oil was migrating back to the clutch plate. A leather insert cut from an old work-glove soaked in oil and then clamped under a rod cap to quiet a knock in the engine. I can't remember what dodgy trick was used for leaking radiators. All of these things worked very well, but just for long enough to sell the car to some poor sucker.--And yes, I have heard the story of cars with a miss where the piston and con-rod had been removed to hide a bad rod bearing.---Brian
        Yes I've heard of all of those too Brian. My father having been an automotive mechanic in Europe, the US and Canada often told me of those unfortunate enough to have purchased a car with one of those quick fixes. These were according to him used universally, anything for a quick a quick dollar.
        With the proliferation of all of the relatively new "mechanic-in-can" products, most of these old quick remedies have now been replaced with better ways to swindle the unsuspecting.

        I can't remember what dodgy trick was used for leaking radiators.
        There were several that I've heard of that were effective in sealing minor cooling system leaks in varying degrees. The one that stands out the most from my experience was ground black pepper. Not only was it very effective in in this role but it's use was virtually undetectable.
        Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
        Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

        Location: British Columbia

        Comment


        • #19
          [QUOTE=cameron;1116309

          How about wrapping a strip of pork rind around a crankshaft journal to repair a run bearing? Seriously proposed to me by a older neighbor and good friend who had farmed during the Depression and after, when I told him of a bearing knock in my MGB.[/QUOTE]
          A local fellow that was a legend in the trucking industry had his Class 1 Semi Truck License will into his 80's.He did that exact thing on a 3 ton delivering groceries to the Yukon in the late 40's.Main Bearing had turned in middle of no where being by himself and 45 below zero.Got a fire going drained oil removed the pan and took a side of bacon out the back of the truck trimmed off a strip and rolled it.Filled engine with oil that he kept warm by the fire then completed his delivery and returned to Edmonton.

          Comment


          • #20
            Egg whites, or cinnamon powder to fix radiator.
            Newspaper roll wetted and let to frozen in winter to fix rotted body/skirts to pass roadworthines inspection.
            Loose ball joints? Grease gun filled with JB-weld / plastic padding and bit of grease mixed together, squirt trough grease nipples to ball joints.
            Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
              Sawdust and a banana, perhaps......

              Someone's been reading "The Grapes of Wrath"?
              You beat me to it. That's a hell of a chapter.

              Comment


              • #22
                Makes sense.. I often say old mechanical things are in stasis...if you clean it all up and remove the gunk you'll see/hear/feel just how worn it really is. Leave it or replace it. The gunk being akin to sawdust etc.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Funny no one has mentioned my old trick of drilling a hole in the exhaust pipe, stuffing some steel wool in
                  and putting a nail in the hole to hold it in.

                  Passed several noise tests that way back in the day.
                  Guaranteed not to rust, bust, collect dust, bend, chip, crack or peel

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Weston Bye View Post
                    Not auto related, but similar - was told by a Polish welder that an unscrupulous horse trader would rub a hot pepper on a tired old horse's butthole to perk it up just before the sale negotiations.
                    I was told root ginger was the stuff to use, it's the origin of the phrase 'Ginger up'
                    I'm in two minds about mentioning this to the wife !!!!

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I have seen it in two rears I tore down to repair. one time I was working in a dealership. a guy comes in and asks if he should put saw dust in the rear to quiet it down to sell. I told him to drain the rear get it good and clean mix sawdust and Elmer's glue. pack it in and leave it set for a day. two days later he comes in yelling the car won't move. I said the rear does not make any noise.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Horse poo for a leaking radiator. Supposedly coarser than other kinds.
                        mark costello-Low speed steel

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by KIMFAB View Post
                          Funny no one has mentioned my old trick of drilling a hole in the exhaust pipe, stuffing some steel wool in
                          and putting a nail in the hole to hold it in.

                          Passed several noise tests that way back in the day.
                          Once used steel wool to silence rusted out mufflers on a motorcycle, didn't even make a mile till the steel wool started coming out as sparks.

                          My favorite trick for 'fixing' a loud exhaust: My old mustang was pretty well built and was fairly loud for the stock look it had. Wife had to drive it to work for a while and got stopped for loud exhaust. I just threw the mags on it and had her take it in for inspection, passed with no problem. As long as the mags were on it, she or I never got stopped, but switch back to the factory style rims and you'd get stopped at least once per trip.

                          In regards to Bob308's post below, once had coworker that would go 'shopping' every time he ran out to his truck for tools/materials. Lots of things would get taken, tools, materials, supplies even food out of lunch boxes. One of the things that would always disappear was motor oil, so one day some of us put seam sealer in oil jugs and placed them in the back of our trucks. After a jug came up missing, he also ended up missing work with a blown engine.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            My uncle Ches bought a Studebaker Hawk years ago. After a few months the engine started knocking. When he opened it up, he found the rod bearings had been replaced with leather strips. He replaced them several times before getting rid of the car.
                            North Central Arkansas

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              I worked for a guy in the early 1980's who put eggs and pepper in a leaking radiator. I thought it was a joke and he was a horses arse.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                My uncle owned several Shell stations west of Chicago Il. Had a older woman come in with and older flathead (would have been sometime in the 60's) that had a crack along the top of the block (also a problem with Ford 8N tractors) She had little money for repairs so, with her knowledge, he put some flax seed meal in the radiator. She ran the car for 10 more years with very little leakage from the cooling system.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X