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  • Fusion 360 software questions

    I'm messing with Fusion 360 after almost two decades away from 3D modeling. It's going pretty good but I'm having trouble turning up answers on some tasks.

    1. Can I make copied parts be a clone of a master part, so when I modify the master it changes all the copies? The scenario is I'm modeling a project box which I will be 3D printing. It has 6 cylindrical standoffs that the circuit board will rest on and be screwed to. I keep wanting to adjust the ID and OD of these posts but keep then centered where I have them. It would be nice if 5 of them would follow changes made to the first one. Possible?

    2. Following from question one... I have a modeled the circuit board for reasons of testing fit-up in the project box. How can I make an object move to butt up against a surface? In this case I have the PCB in the correct X-Y position but want it to 'drop' on the Z axis until it's resting on the standoff/screw posts.

    3. I have a project that contains many parts. I want to save one part that I am happy with for use in other projects. I can export an STL but there must be a native Fusion 3D format for models, not entire projects? And a way to import the model when I'm working on new projects? The STL method doesn't retain the object properties.

    Thanks for any advice. I have found many answers via Google but these have been eluding me a bit.

  • #2
    1. Yes. Copy|Paste creates a clone. Changing the original will change the copies. (Assuming you're in Timeline mode) You can use Copy|Paste New when you don't want the copy modified by the original.

    2. Use either a rigid joint or the align tool to precisely position parts.

    3. Easiest way is to copy the component into a new file, then save that file. You can either import a file into an open file from the data port or you can open the file and copy the component into another open file. The only reason to ever use STL files is for compatibility with brain dead programs.

    You should use Rule #1 in all of your designs: https://forums.autodesk.com/t5/desig...2/td-p/6581749

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    • #3
      I have a love hate relationship with Fusion 360. The quote that sums it up best came from one of the Fusion 360 forums.

      "I never had anger issues with a computer program before I started using Fusion 360. But I can't leave it alone. It's sooo much fun."

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      • #4
        Does it REALLY carry changes from the original part into all others?

        I'm not sure that is a good feature, as often you want to start with a base part, and create several variations from it. It could be a problem to have them all tied back to the original, even though that might be, in a few cases, a good thing.

        Presumably you have the choice to link back or not?

        The program I use does not do that, copies are stand-alone parts, and 99.99% or the time that is what I want, particularly so I KNOW FOR SURE what is being changed. I REALLY HATE changes that occur due to obscure links between files, that I probably have forgotten existed.
        CNC machines only go through the motions

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        • #5
          Copy|Paste creates a clone. Any changes in the original or clone are reflected in each. Copy|Paste New creates a new copy that isn't modified when the original changes. If you create a clone and then change your mind, just make a copy of the clone and paste new. If you create a copy and you want it to change with the original, then user parameters can be used to set most settings to the same value.

          Here's a little pcb I designed in Kicad and imported into Fusion 360:

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          • #6
            I came to Fusion360 from SolidWorks. Since Fusion360 is free, I went with it. Theres some things that I dearly miss from Solidworks, like having one part with variations, defined in a table. When I import my solidworks projects into Fusion, it seems that the parts with variations simply vanish, even though there is a placeholder for them. Joints or assemblies I also miss from Solidworks. Joints in Fusion just seem more limiting. The price is right however, and it always makes flawless stl's that Simplify3D has no issues with. I can't wait to try out the built in CAM functions. Maybe if I get a divorce... Hmm...


            Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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            • #7
              Originally posted by elf View Post
              Copy|Paste creates a clone. Any changes in the original or clone are reflected in each. Copy|Paste New creates a new copy that isn't modified when the original changes. If you create a clone and then change your mind, just make a copy of the clone and paste new. If you create a copy and you want it to change with the original, then user parameters can be used to set most settings to the same value.

              Here's a little pcb I designed in Kicad and imported into Fusion 360:
              I see a microprocessor, and what might be three dual H bridges or Stepper drivers, since they have their own heat sinks, and well just a hunch really. You making your own CNC controller?


              Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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              • #8
                Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                I see a microprocessor, and what might be three dual H bridges or Stepper drivers, since they have their own heat sinks, and well just a hunch really. You making your own CNC controller?


                Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                Almost It's a three axis controller for a camera macro panorama head. It could probably be used for CNC. It has a Teensy 3.2 microprocessor, 2 opto-isolators, 3 stepper drivers, SPI and I2C interfaces, a serial Bluetooth interface, and still has open pins for limit switches. The main reason for the pcb was to fit everything into small space.

                Here's an earlier single axis controller with 3d printed enclosure:

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                • #9
                  You know how many miles of filament I would of used as a kid, printing project boxes, if I had a 3d printer back then? Very nice work. Now that Autodesk ruined Eagle, you are using Kicad? I like what you did with Fusion!

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                  • #10
                    I tried Eagle, but I fell off the learning curve The artificial limits on board size didn't help either. Kicad has it's own fairly steep learning curve, but I found it easier to understand than Eagle. The price is right too.

                    I did all of the routing in Kicad, then imported the dxf to Fusion 360. Most manufacturers have 3d models of their parts, so I only had to create a couple of them. Fusion 360 made it easy to find placement conflicts.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by elf View Post
                      I tried Eagle, but I fell off the learning curve The artificial limits on board size didn't help either. Kicad has it's own fairly steep learning curve, but I found it easier to understand than Eagle. The price is right too.

                      I did all of the routing in Kicad, then imported the dxf to Fusion 360. Most manufacturers have 3d models of their parts, so I only had to create a couple of them. Fusion 360 made it easy to find placement conflicts.
                      The Germans like to complicate things! I'll have to give kicad a try!

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