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got a new lathe from grizzly ????

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  • MikeL46
    replied
    Originally posted by Dave C View Post
    13x40 from my truck to the driveway:
    My lathe wanted to rotate when lifted like that. The motor is heavy and way off center. Another strap around the motor to the pickup stabilized it.

    Mike

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  • Baz
    replied
    When rigged as above the lathe is top heavy and can rotate with it sliding round in the slings. Two simple improvements. Take a full turn round the bed with the strop near the headstock to increase friction. More importantly put a stout bar through the spindle and through the strop then tie them together at this point. This puts a constraint on it revolving.

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  • BCRider
    replied
    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
    What I hate about my engine hoist is that the legs are ALWAYS in the way
    That's going to be the case with any floor based lift though. Because I've got the engine hoist the tools and studs naturally ended up being spaced to working with the legs of the hoist. So I don't find that the hoist is any trouble.

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  • RB211
    replied
    What I hate about my engine hoist is that the legs are ALWAYS in the way

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  • Dave C
    replied
    Originally posted by Brett Hurt View Post
    thanks for the info do you guys have a picture of a lathe and a engine host piking it up thanks
    13x40 from my truck to the driveway:

    I unloaded it by myself, but be advised that is no light weight, Harbor Freight engine hoist. It's home built from 3/16" wall, 3" x 5" tubing. it rolls on 6" wheels up front and 6" swivel casters at the rear, all are rated for 1000 lbs.
    Make sure your slings are not positioned where they can put pressure on the lead/feed/control shafts. I used 2 chain hoists to keep the load level.
    Last edited by Dave C; 05-21-2017, 03:24 AM.

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  • Brett Hurt
    replied
    thanks for the info do you guys have a picture of a lathe and a engine host piking it up thanks

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  • Seastar
    replied
    I bought a 20kW Kohler generator for my cabin in Minnesota.
    The company that delivered it was supposed to place it on the concrete slab where it would live.
    Problem was nobody told the driver. The generator came from a dealer in Minneapolis and was delivered to my off the grid cabin 300 miles away. No where to get any help.
    I put the bucket forks on my little John Deere tractor and by golly it lifted that 3000# load, barely.
    I had to keep the engine at a high RPM to have enough hydraulic power.
    Since then I have used that tractor to lift the back of a dump truck (empty) to repair a flat tire.
    Moral is find some one with a tractor with bucket forks

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  • Highpower
    replied
    Most "lift gate" deliveries are considered curbside deliveries. The drivers are only required to get your item(s) down to the curb (street). They have no obligation to move it any farther than that. However most drivers are nice enough to help you out as much as they can - but don't count on it. The problem I have had on several occasions is that your "stuff" shows up in the back of a 40 ft semi-trailer without a lift gate, even though you paid extra for that service. Usually because the seller doesn't relay that information to the freight company making the delivery. I had that happen when my mill was delivered. (Bridgeport clone.)

    I don't have a forklift, the truck didn't have the lift gate I paid for, and the driver and I certainly weren't going to be able to get it out of the trailer on our own. So I called the place I bought the mill from and gave them their choice. Either I refuse the shipment and send it back to them for a refund, or they can send someone out with the proper equipment to unload it from the truck. 15 minutes later a wrecker arrived to extract the mill. Much more debate between the two drivers ensued over the towing company accepting a company check from the freight company or not.... yada, yada, yada.

    In the end the wrecker plucked the mill from the trailer (using my lift straps) and then backed it up my driveway and set it behind the house where I wanted it. Moral of the story - be prepared and have a backup plan for if things don't go the way you had hoped for.

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  • LARRYR
    replied
    my buddy just took delivery of a grizzly 12x36 gunsmith lathe. we picked it up at the ups depot. it came in three packages. the lathe the stand and a box of accessories. ups loaded it on our flat bed truck with a forklift. they will deliver but you need to be able to off load from the tail gate. that means a loading dock or a forklift. to assemble the lathe you will need some type of lifting device capable of handling the 1000 + lbs its tricky to lift you will need two slings. the operators manual shows a method of rigging it. if you cant assemble it in place you will need a way to move it into position. so think ahead. we had a forklift so the job was fairly simple. i also own a grizzly 12x36 and i have moved it using my one ton engine hoist. don't try to short cut this operation, if you dont have the proper equipment and experience get help. this could be an expensive aw ****. i think you will like the lathe i have used mine for 30 yrs and its plenty accurate. the new gear head lathes sure beat changing belts. good luck and work safe.

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  • jocat54
    replied
    When they delivered my 12x36 (Enco) it was by a freight line with a lift gate. Driver lowered it with the lift gate and then rolled it up my driveway (300') to my shop on a pallet jack. Took all of 5 minutes. Really nice guy, tried to give him $20 but would not take it--said it was his job. Inside the shop I used a HF 2 ton lift. Pretty easy. Weight was 1250 lbs.
    Last edited by jocat54; 05-20-2017, 12:06 AM.

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  • sch
    replied
    1400Lbs, sounds like a 12-36 or 14-40 sized lathe. Should come in a box 18-22" square by length of lathe, 50-60" or so. Box will be heavier on
    one end where motor/headstock is. It will have some skids on the bottom out of 2" stock and a forklift slot in the skids probably. If there is a
    pallet jack on the truck a $20 or so to the driver to keep lathe on that and move it where you want it. Hope you have a driveway paved and
    in good condition. If driver balks at helping you your best bet is rolling on pipes, you should have at least 4 and they should be over 1" in
    diameter unless your pavement is very smooth. Length should be 12-18" longer than box is wide. Moving a 1400# box with an overhead lift
    like engine hoist is a dicey affair as once that pendulum starts to swing it doesn't take much to tip things over. Moving it on the legs of the
    hoist might work but the rollers on these are not very rolly when loaded up. When I moved mine (~900 or so #, after removing motor and
    out of box) I used a lot of snubbing cords to the lathe to reduce tipping risk and used the tailstock to help balance the load. We moved it close
    to where it was going to live with the lathe unboxed except bottom of box and used rollers with the hoist used to lift it onto the stands.

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  • BCRider
    replied
    An engine hoist can be fine for moving the lathe as well as lifting it into place. The key to moving it safely is to lower it onto a wide board or a couple of 2x4's that are sitting on the legs. With the lathe that low and with the balance point of the machine within the wheel support you can push the hoist around just fine and with safety.

    I do agree though that if the load is up high you need to use care. Push or pull low on the hoist to inch the machine into place so you don't induce a tipping moment in the setup.

    I've used my engine hoist now for moving a pretty wide assortment of tooling around the shop. It was supposed to be a temporary purchase that I'd sell off once done with my shop setup. But it's proven to be so helpful that I'm keeping it. But I would also say that it does need to be used with care and thought.

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  • Toolguy
    replied
    So... which lathe is it? We need more details in order to properly celebrate with you!

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  • lugnut
    replied
    I guess for getting any good advice it would be nice to know what model and how much it weighs. When I got my 9 x 20 lathe from Grizzly the driver and I was able to slide the crates from the truck into the back of my pickup and then I got a couple neighbors to help me from there.. We used a engine/cherry picker to get it out of the pickup and up on it' stand. Be careful.

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  • Brett Hurt
    replied
    Thanks! What size cherry picker did you use? It weighs about 1400 lbs.

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