Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

OT New linecord for an old drill

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    I have been using the old extension cord trick for a while now. Not only is it handy but it cost me far less to buy an extension cord and cut it up than it does to buy a plug and wire. With all of this said, I am not doing the corded tool thing anymore unless its a table saw or a mill/lathe/shaper etc...

    For my tools I have settled on Milwaukee 18V batteries and Milwaukee 28v batteries. (2 of each). I have 3d printed adaptors for my milwaukee batteries to a roybi saw and a ridgid hammer drill as well as a HF drill. I don't need any more than this. I prefer the compact 18V batteries for main running, the 28v stuff is for the sawsall and the ridgid drill. The best part is I have less than 150$ invested as the tools become obsolete once the batteries are no longer available. The milwaukee batteries have built in protection so that makes them decent for this.
    12x16" Delta 3d printer (Built from scratch)
    Logan 825 - work in progress
    My Blog - http://engineerd3d.ddns.net/
    Youtube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVY...view_as=public
    Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/engineerd3d/?hl=en

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by alanganes View Post
      I had a contractor friend that would cut his tool cords off to about 8" or so and replace the plug with an appropriate 120V twist-lock style plug. ...
      And ... the tools are much less likely to "grow legs and walk off".

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by mattthegamer463 View Post
        The clever Marius Hornberger did this recently, took it to the nth degree with fairly-expensive locking connectors but it looks great. If I had 10 angle grinders and 5 routers and 6 hammer drills like some folks I think this would be high on my list.

        There's nothing wrong with the concept but I question his implementation. At 5:35 he states:
        On this sander the rubber sleeve in the back is ridiculously long.
        The sleeve he's referring to is the strain relief, a concept he's obviously not familiar with since he systematically omits them from each tool
        that he modifies. A long strain relief like that is exactly what you want since it spreads the load resulting in a gentler bend.
        Location: Long Island, N.Y.

        Comment


        • #19
          I don't have a problem with corded tools, but I sure do have a problem with the crappy vinyl cords. Give me a real cord that doesn't come with the built-in kinks.

          Closest I ever got to a replacement cord with molded plug that I was almost happy with was a block heater cord. There was a sale on those at one point and I bought several- used them as replacement cords for drills, etc, and as connecting cords for various pieces of electronic equipment.

          For me to be most happy the cord would be flexible and durable, and would have a molded plug. I don't like the 'fit it on yourself' plugs because they are too bulky and often have protrusions that catch on things or hack you- and they have become increasingly expensive. For my lighting project I was happy to find an old roll of cab tire, which will probably remain flexible long after the newer stuff becomes stiff and aged. I made my own plugs, which was a bit of work as you can imagine, but they are compact and clamp the wire properly without external hardware. I was not into paying $6 or $7 each for the only plugs I could find in stores- and I needed about 60 of them.

          On this same note, the bulky external hardware-laden commercial plug, the sockets are the same. I've often thought that I'd like to have the tool with just the connecting blades sticking out, to which you'd just plug an extension cord - some of the yard tools are like that- but again I don't like the bulkiness of the 'do it yourself' connectors. The Neutrik connectors are nice, but while not particularly fat they are too long- and you'd have to take out a mortgage to afford any appreciable number of them.
          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

          Comment


          • #20
            Then you get the OLD power leads on OLD equipment - the ones with old rubber insulation.
            The trouble is the rubber perishes, and you are left with manky copper wires swimming around in sticky goo. Sometimes they short out and the whole power lead inflates into a large sausage, shortly before there is a loud bang and the lights go out.

            Stop worrying about the elegance of the plug. Worry about the lead itself!

            Cheers
            Roger

            Comment


            • #21
              Now who the heck would make his own plugs? Well, of course, who else?

              Any chance we can have a peek at those plugs, Darryl?

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post
                And ... the tools are much less likely to "grow legs and walk off".
                That's an advantage that didn't occur to me, but very true. Might discourage a few low grade job site crooks.

                And I second wanting to see Darryl's home-brew connectors, sounds interesting.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by engineerd3d View Post
                  ... I have 3d printed adaptors for my milwaukee batteries to a roybi saw and a ridgid hammer drill as well as a HF drill. I don't need any more than this...
                  Share please A separate thread on this would be great.

                  I've settled on the Milwaukee M12 standard, but I'd really like to read/see how you drew and printed your own adaptors. Issues? Hints? Not a top-tier project for me at the moment, but it's on the list of things to be able to do.

                  David...
                  http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by darryl View Post
                    ... I've often thought that I'd like to have the tool with just the connecting blades sticking out, to which you'd just plug an extension cord...
                    You mean like the Bosch Direct Connect system? Yeah, my circular saw has that... works really well. Just stuff the end of most 3-prong extension cords right into the end of the saw handle, optionally put a wrap through the integrated cable lock, and you're good to go. It came with a nice 25' extension cord; I often use it with a short "appliance" extension cord.

                    David...
                    http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X