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Coalbrookdale foundry (England) ceases operation

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  • David Powell
    replied
    I did the opposite.

    Originally posted by boslab View Post
    It will probably be bulldozed and turned into a housing estate.
    Everyone wants to work in an office, sit behind a desk and feel empowered, working making things doesn't seem to appeal to the young.
    Mark
    My parents wanted me to have a" Clean Hands " career. I became well educated , but paid for that education by working for a family machine shop and contracting business. I gave up office work after about 5 years, moved to Canada, and made a new beginning as a machinist. It has been one hell of an adventure. I have worked in all sorts of places from Amusement parks to developing tooling to assemble electronic gadgets ( Any of you got or used a Blackberry?) In my own mind I "OWN" all that I have made. I am proud that I have made useful things, helped , among other things entertain, transport and improve the health of others. I do not believe any office type job could ever give that lifelong satisfaction. I am not a rich man, but I am a satisfied one. Regards David Powell.

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  • boslab
    replied
    It will probably be bulldozed and turned into a housing estate.
    Everyone wants to work in an office, sit behind a desk and feel empowered, working making things doesn't seem to appeal to the young.
    Mark

    Leave a comment:


  • TRX
    replied
    Wow. I had no idea Coalbrookdale was still in operation.

    If anyone wants to make the pilgrimage... the Industrial Revolution started at Coalbrookdale on January 10, 1709, at about 10:30 in the morning. That's when Abraham Darby made his first pour with his new steelmaking process.

    The Industrial Revolution had been hanging fire for a long time. People had grand ideas for steel rail roads, steam engines, bigger and better guns, steel bridges, ships made of metal... other than "proof of concept" projects, the whole world was waiting for the key part to make it all work: affordable steel. In commercial quantities. And of known and repeatable characteristics.

    Before Darby, steel was expensive and you never quite knew how the final product would turn out. Darby was able to tune his process to make repeatable batches in quantity. And *that* is what turned a bunch of not-economically-feasible ideas into commercial products.

    If there's any place on Earth that ought to be a World Heritage Site, it's Coalbrookdale. But I imagine most peoples' eyes would glaze over long before you could finish explaining why. And I imagine the place isn't much to look at, but still...

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  • Alistair Hosie
    replied
    RB 211 said This country is being destroyed by greed

    As well as all of the developed world brother. In any case Not to make a political point but I was in the line of thinking that INDIA and Perhaps China were now the leaders in steel manufacture China perhaps manufacturing what it makes possibly I don't know. I am not really in favour of coal and steel plants, especially in the historic past. Especially in my mind the coal industry .over decades and more responsible for the dangers and deaths of many good and poor people. Dangerous jobs did become much better through time investment and effort, but as far as history is concerned steel and coal were always filthy dangerous jobs, with deep sea fishing third in line this now taken over by giant ships. As said in discussion earlier re the pound. Now a changing world fascinating as it is. I hope this is not too upsetting to anyone here sincerely meant Alistair

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  • Magicniner
    replied
    Originally posted by boslab View Post
    I'm going to bet brexit is somehow responsible, bet it's relocating manufacturing to Europe aka Germany or the German republic, perhaps French Germany or Spanish Germany even
    Mark
    Unless the pound skyrockets there's no logic in blaming it on leaving the EU, Remoaners will no doubt still do so though.
    It's more likely pursuit of cheaper labour and lower costs to boost income for the poor impecunious shareholders and corporate no overview of who buys your stuff once you beggar your core markets by offshoring everything.

    Leave a comment:


  • HWooldridge
    replied
    Originally posted by tlfamm View Post
    During my tour of duty in the US Army, the top non-commissioned officer was Sergeant Major William O. Wooldridge (1922-2012). A relative?
    Yes, according to our family history and Ancestry.com, I believe his great-grandfather was a brother to my great-great grandfather.

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  • tlfamm
    replied
    Originally posted by HWooldridge View Post
    My Wooldridge ancestors apparently lived in this area and my direct ancestor Richard Wooldridge immigrated to the Americas in 1697. He was a blacksmith (along with most everybody else at that time...)

    I was fortunate enough to tour Ironbridge Gorge while on a business trip to England in the late 1990's. One of the locals recognized my last name and told me to look in the phone book. I had never seen so many Wooldridges in one place.
    During my tour of duty in the US Army, the top non-commissioned officer was Sergeant Major William O. Wooldridge (1922-2012). A relative?

    Leave a comment:


  • HWooldridge
    replied
    My Wooldridge ancestors apparently lived in this area and my direct ancestor Richard Wooldridge immigrated to the Americas in 1697. He was a blacksmith (along with most everybody else at that time...)

    I was fortunate enough to tour Ironbridge Gorge while on a business trip to England in the late 1990's. One of the locals recognized my last name and told me to look in the phone book. I had never seen so many Wooldridges in one place.

    Leave a comment:


  • boslab
    replied
    I'm going to bet brexit is somehow responsible, bet it's relocating manufacturing to Europe aka Germany or the German republic, perhaps French Germany or Spanish Germany even
    Mark

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  • Mark Rand
    replied
    Given that the foundry makes all the castings for Rayburn and Aga stoves, one would think that there is a small but steady and profitable line of work.

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  • boslab
    replied
    IT would be nice if the workers had a buyout, doesn't look like the parent company would resist, I'm sure they can find a niche to operate in, even if it's only as a smaller jobbing shop with pattern making, survival is the key.
    Mark

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  • RB211
    replied
    Every time I travel the world, then come back to the USA, I am always feeling like I am getting nickled and dimed to death. This country is being destroyed by greed.

    Leave a comment:


  • blckbx
    replied
    Sorry to hear this. In my mid 40's I'm just getting back into engineering which I enjoyed in my early years. This community has displayed a wealth of knowledge which I hope we can maintain in the UK despite globalisation.

    Cheaper is not the only issue.

    Al

    Leave a comment:


  • tlfamm
    started a topic Coalbrookdale foundry (England) ceases operation

    Coalbrookdale foundry (England) ceases operation

    300 years of iron foundry ends in Coalbrookdale, England, shut down by an American conglomerate:


    https://www.shropshirestar.com/news/...-beat-no-more/

    http://shropshirehistory.com/iron/coalbrookdale.htm

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coalbrookdale

    a blurb on iron-bridge:
    http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/v...ridge/history/

    ================================================== =========================

    Back in 'murica, we find the Colebrookdale Furnace & Iron Works, Pottstown(*), Pennsylvania, established in 1716 (8 years after the original in England):

    * 40 miles northwest of Philadelphia.

    http://paironworks.rootsweb.ancestry.com/berbirth.html
    Last edited by tlfamm; 05-25-2017, 01:47 PM.
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