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  • New history of Brown & Sharpe

    "Brown & Sharpe and the Measure of American Industry: Making the Precision Machine Tools That Enabled Manufacturing, 1833-2001"

    by Gerald Carbone of the Rhode Island Historical Society, published April 4, 2017

    Amazon's synopsis:

    "Joseph Brown, founder of Brown & Sharpe, was a skilled clockmaker who invented new machines, and new ways to make things. Samuel Darling, an eccentric inventor from Maine, joined up and brought with him his engine for marking precise graduations on measuring instruments. Lucian Sharpe, with his son Henry and grandson Henry, Jr., guided the company for more than a centuryand along with it the global machine tools industry. The men and women of Brown & Sharpe produced and marketed a dazzling array of measuring devices, machine tools and precision machinery. They truly helped shape Rhode Island, the nation and the modern world. The history of Brown & Sharpe covers more than 150 years of technological development, labor history and public policy, culminating in history's longest strike."

    https://www.amazon.com/Brown-Sharpe-...7666921X/Brown & Sharpe and the Measure of American Industry: Making the Precision Machine Tools That Enabled Manufacturing, 1833-2001

  • #2
    How does this "New History of Brown and Sharpe" differ from the old?
    Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

    Comment


    • #3
      The new history as far as I see, is that the 'new' Brown & Sharpe is producing garbage made in China. Nothing at all like the "old" B&S in terms of quality. JMHO.

      Comment


      • #4
        20 years ago, I ordered a set of new Brown and Sharpe telescoping
        gauges from Enco. They are pure crap. Made in China.
        Fooled me once.

        --Doozer
        DZER

        Comment


        • #5
          I'll have to get to a better internet connection before I can check that reference.

          But wouldn't it be nice if the writers of technological histories provided more technical details? Sure would like to see a thorough description of the engine for marking precise graduations, along with detail drawings.

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          • #6
            That's not their "thing". And considering how they often get the technical details wrong, we are better off when they avoid them.

            I still laugh when I remember a video on the History Channel that boldly stated that the sun and planet gears were invented as a basic and necessary part of the steam engine. As if the crank had never existed. The only reason why any steam engine EVER had sun and planet gears was that the crank shaft was patented. When that patent expired or was successfully challenged, the sun and planet gear disappeared almost completely from engines of any kind.

            No, I do not want history authors to discuss technical matters. NEVER!



            Originally posted by cameron View Post
            I'll have to get to a better internet connection before I can check that reference.

            But wouldn't it be nice if the writers of technological histories provided more technical details? Sure would like to see a thorough description of the engine for marking precise graduations, along with detail drawings.
            Paul A.
            SE Texas

            And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
            You will find that it has discrete steps.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Highpower View Post
              The new history as far as I see, is that the 'new' Brown & Sharpe is producing garbage made in China. Nothing at all like the "old" B&S in terms of quality. JMHO.
              Agreed.

              JL...................

              Comment


              • #8
                They are also destroying the Tesa brand. I bought this "Brown & Sharpe TESA" set recently
                https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0... ie=UTF8&psc=1

                I only paid $130 from Amazon. I knew what to expect as the Tesa web site says it's sourced from "outside Europe". It was a bit worse than I expected, but reasonable for $130. The scale is made in the US, but the rest is from an unidentified country. Anyone paying $450 is getting ripped off. You can buy Starrett or Mitutoyo for less.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                  That's not their "thing". And considering how they often get the technical details wrong, we are better off when they avoid them.

                  No, I do not want history authors to discuss technical matters. NEVER!
                  I don't want them to discuss technical matters either. I would like them to present them to us, in unexpurgated form, when they are available.

                  In the same way, I don't want museum curators "interpreting" the artifacts. Just show us the damn stuff. I can't go into a museum without being told what I'm supposed to think.

                  When I was a kid I used to spend hours in what is now called "the Museum of Man". It was full of wonderful stuff, including a 24 ft kayak, which I still think was the most beautiful vessel I have ever seen. Where are all the things I used to go there to see? All the best stuff is packed away in a warehouse somewhere, probably because they couldn't interpret them for us. No room to show them anyway, because the interpretive exhibitions take up so much space.

                  I'm way off topic here, so don't read this.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by tlfamm View Post
                    "Brown & Sharpe and the Measure of American Industry: Making the Precision Machine Tools That Enabled Manufacturing, 1833-2001"

                    by Gerald Carbone of the Rhode Island Historical Society, published April 4, 2017

                    Amazon's synopsis:

                    "Joseph Brown, founder of Brown & Sharpe, was a skilled clockmaker who invented new machines, and new ways to make things. Samuel Darling, an eccentric inventor from Maine, joined up and brought with him his engine for marking precise graduations on measuring instruments. Lucian Sharpe, with his son Henry and grandson Henry, Jr., guided the company for more than a centuryand along with it the global machine tools industry. The men and women of Brown & Sharpe produced and marketed a dazzling array of measuring devices, machine tools and precision machinery. They truly helped shape Rhode Island, the nation and the modern world. The history of Brown & Sharpe covers more than 150 years of technological development, labor history and public policy, culminating in history's longest strike."

                    https://www.amazon.com/Brown-Sharpe-...7666921X/Brown & Sharpe and the Measure of American Industry: Making the Precision Machine Tools That Enabled Manufacturing, 1833-2001
                    Thank you very much for bringing this work to my attention.

                    David

                    Comment

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