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  • wierdscience
    replied
    Originally posted by 754 View Post
    Well I dont know if I can get a tank with everything on it , mount up top for head and motor, handlebar, wheels and foot to hold it level..... Be a lot of work to put on another tank..and of course more welding.
    Is there a relatively cheap way to thickness test ?
    If it has a pin hole rusted in,then it's done.Where there is one pin hole,there are usually more nearby waiting to open.

    One possible source for a tank,is any local big box stores that sell air compressors.Sometimes they will have a warranty return on a pump that slung a rod and will turn loose of those cheap,since they usually end up in a landfill.I've gotten two new tanks like that in years past,that came with new motors as a bonus.

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  • RB211
    replied
    I know it's shot, uses an old ac compressor. Need to replace it.

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  • Dave C
    replied
    40 + years ago I bought a used Quincy rig from an outfit that was converting service stations to convenience stores. I traded the big verticle tank for an old 60 gallon, horizontal Wayne tank. When the bottom of the wayne started hissing, I took it to a sheet metal shop that is certified for boiler repair work. They cut the whole bottom out of the tank, rolled a 10 gauge patch, and welded it in. It's been going strong for over 30 years now.

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  • 754
    replied
    Well I dont know if I can get a tank with everything on it , mount up top for head and motor, handlebar, wheels and foot to hold it level..... Be a lot of work to put on another tank..and of course more welding.
    Is there a relatively cheap way to thickness test ?
    Last edited by 754; 05-28-2017, 03:22 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • dave_r
    replied
    Originally posted by dave_r View Post
    Same with me, had a 60 gal compressor that had a manual valve at the bottom that was annoying to get to to vent the tank regularly, so it was very rarely done, and the tank developed pinhole leaks on the bottom. It's now waiting to go to the scrap metal place and I bought a new compressor. Initially bought a Sanborn 80 gal, but the compressor failed during the break in cycle listed in the manual, so I returned it for an IR 60 gal for another couple hundred dollars, and it's going strong.

    Naturally, a couple weeks after I bought it, I found a place selling new 60 gal tanks, which I would have preferred to buy as the motor/compressor was still perfectly fine...
    Oh, yeah, the other thing I did for the new tank was to buy an easier to use vent for the bottom, a kind of tilting vent with a cable, so I can walk by, pull the cable and the vent opens.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by Highpower View Post
    THIS - No exceptions.
    Unless you are a certified weldor, AND have the joint "designed" by qualified folks.... Which is more than the original chinese tanks are......

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  • Highpower
    replied
    Originally posted by tom_d View Post
    Please do not try welding on this, or any pressure vessel.
    THIS - No exceptions.

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  • Sparky_NY
    replied
    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
    I know my compressor tank is not rusting, because every time I drain it, an oily sludge comes out.
    Think again, oil floats on top of the water, so the water is what is in contact with the tank. If the oil content is real high, well... your compressor is shot.
    They all have a oily looking water when drained but still rust out from the inside.

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  • RB211
    replied
    I know my compressor tank is not rusting, because every time I drain it, an oily sludge comes out.

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  • tom_d
    replied
    Please do not try welding on this, or any pressure vessel. Shop around for a new tank of good quality construction if the motor and pump are worth salvaging. A tank that has started to leak is just an accident waiting to happen.

    Leave a comment:


  • dave_r
    replied
    Same with me, had a 60 gal compressor that had a manual valve at the bottom that was annoying to get to to vent the tank regularly, so it was very rarely done, and the tank developed pinhole leaks on the bottom. It's now waiting to go to the scrap metal place and I bought a new compressor. Initially bought a Sanborn 80 gal, but the compressor failed during the break in cycle listed in the manual, so I returned it for an IR 60 gal for another couple hundred dollars, and it's going strong.

    Naturally, a couple weeks after I bought it, I found a place selling new 60 gal tanks, which I would have preferred to buy as the motor/compressor was still perfectly fine...

    Leave a comment:


  • wierdscience
    replied
    +1 for it's a bomb-

    A good friend of mine lost his leg to a roll around compressor tank exploding,search the archives here for the post.He's not the only one either-

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa...sion-1.2455194

    http://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local...141355453.html

    https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C...uRD9nzTNn72vM:

    I would take the pump and motor off and either cut a large hole in the tank before scraping it,or turn it into a BBQ grill and buy a new compressor.If it's as old as you say it is,then you have gotten your money's worth out of it.

    $350 isn't worth worth the risk IMO-

    https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/pr...r?cm_vc=-10005

    Leave a comment:


  • cameron
    replied
    I retired an older compressor recently with the same size tank, but horizontal. No leaks, and tapping along the bottom seemed to indicate the same thickness there as elsewhere. I figured it's time was up, and I didn't want to worry about it killing someone.

    Bought a Porter-Cable, smaller output, huge tank with larger diameter. The tank is "certified" to ASTM (or something like that), with the tacked on label, which the old tank didn't have. But the metal seems paper thin compared to the old tank, and the manufacturer says to junk the tank after ten years.

    I sure didn't get the peace of mind I thought I was paying for.

    If you decide to replace the old tank, try to find out beforehand just what it is you're buying.

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  • Boostinjdm
    replied
    It's a time bomb.

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  • Sparky_NY
    replied
    Originally posted by plunger View Post
    I would just weld it. I did this to my new one which was leaking from the weld around the drain plug. I was to lazy to return it to the hardware and I bought it in the late eightys.Still going fine.
    The tank posted about is 30 years old before it began leaking. The metal is no doubt paper thin in a line along the bottom where the water sat. Attempts to weld it will blow through all over the place.

    Your tank was new, way different situation !

    Leave a comment:

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