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Need Plans For Acetylene Cutting Torch Guides

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  • Need Plans For Acetylene Cutting Torch Guides

    I am looking for plans for an acetylene cutting torch guide that does straight lines with a guide, or circular, or both.

    Can you point me to anything? I have a 4' x 8' piece of 1/4" to cut up.
    What ever happened to reasoned discussion of the issues? Now, if you don't instantly and enthusiastically endorse the leftist view, you are labeled with some word ending in "ist", and told you are an agent of evil. Wasn't that how it was done in 1930's Russia and Germany?

  • #2
    Piece of angle iron works pretty good for straight lines. Clamp it to the work and run the torch against it.

    Circle cutters are also simple - I bought one of these about 30 years ago and it still works like new.

    https://weldingsupply.com/cgi-bin/ei...:UNDEF:X:16229

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    • #3
      Yes, angle iron works well if you have past experience AND recent practice, AND steady hands. There's always some re-learning to do when coming back to torch welding or cutting after being away for a while. The angle iron doesn't control height or speed, and it doesn't set the preheat.

      I just did a little cutting job with an angle iron guide a couple of days ago. I thought I used to be pretty good at it, and the first few inches went well. Then I lost the cut and restarted a little off the line. Then the wobble started and... ooh, there's gonna be a lot of grinding.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by cameron View Post
        Yes, angle iron works well if you have past experience AND recent practice, AND steady hands. There's always some re-learning to do when coming back to torch welding or cutting after being away for a while. The angle iron doesn't control height or speed, and it doesn't set the preheat.

        I just did a little cutting job with an angle iron guide a couple of days ago. I thought I used to be pretty good at it, and the first few inches went well. Then I lost the cut and restarted a little off the line. Then the wobble started and... ooh, there's gonna be a lot of grinding.
        Concur.

        May end up making it by guessing everything. Seen plans for plasma torches, but not for acetylene.

        Saw one at work at McKinsey Steel in Ft. Lauderdale. Was set up with a motor that drew the torch along the steel, along a guide. It cut amazingly straight and smooth cuts. While I was watching, it cut a 4" strip off a 10' sheet of 3/16" steel. Ruler straight. Nice, smooth cut.
        What ever happened to reasoned discussion of the issues? Now, if you don't instantly and enthusiastically endorse the leftist view, you are labeled with some word ending in "ist", and told you are an agent of evil. Wasn't that how it was done in 1930's Russia and Germany?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by John Buffum View Post
          Concur.

          May end up making it by guessing everything. Seen plans for plasma torches, but not for acetylene.

          Saw one at work at McKinsey Steel in Ft. Lauderdale. Was set up with a motor that drew the torch along the steel,
          called a Beetle. Can also be set at an angle to bevel.....and they've got them with Mig to do a bead.
          .

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          • #6
            I have a commercial made rolling guide that has two wheels to set the height and lets you run it along an angle iron. It's similar to this one

            LINK


            I saw one guy use a home built thing that was little more than a piece of 1/2" or so steel rod maybe 3" long with a metal disk wheel at each end and the cutting torch head clamped to the midpoint with something like a u-bolt or hose clamp (I don't quite recall). It worked as well (in his hands anyhow) as my official one.

            A google image search on something like "cutting torch guide" gets lots of seeds for ideas of stuff you could cobble up pretty readily if buying something is not a preferred option or just less fun than rolling your won.

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            • #7
              Some of mine

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              • #8
                It's a harder nozzle to use (on 1/4, thinner is easier) an ASNM it's an DA/Oxy nozzle, it rests on your work, single preheat, single, as they are oxy jet, these are drag cutters, flat bar is adequate, gas consumption very low compared to a 1/16, one peice so propane isn't possible, 2 peice are propane or whatever gas your using.
                It's worth getting one, goes through 1/8 at plasma speeds.
                Whatever your using watch the straightedge doesn't bow up, tack it on if you want, if it bows torch height goes out if your riding the nozzle nut on the angle or bar and preheat flame zips under the bar and burns your hand!, yes I have.
                I'm all for tack welding straight edges if a critical plate job is on hand myself, once done a chisel under lifts it and breaks the tacks, remember to tack it not bloody stich it as I did once.
                Flap wheel the weld off.
                1/4 is a nice cutting thickness, but with a 1/16 nozzle it's fast, too fast really hence I go with ASNM sheet and plate, it's at the top of its range but leaves a lovely cut after a bit of practice.
                The alternate is a saw, not too bad a job for a metal blade really.
                Mark
                It says 3.00 max but I cut a 1/4 plate day before yesterday without much trouble
                http://www.weldability-sif.com/pages..._string=CCASNM
                Last edited by boslab; 05-30-2017, 06:58 PM.

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                • #9
                  I'm surprised Mark is the only one warning about bow/warp using angle iron or flat bar. Unless your guide material is much heavier than your work piece it will bow. Wood will make a straighter cut if you can do it outside and upwind! The other downside to wood is it won't hold up for multiple cuts.

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                  • #10
                    I can recommend Tanjant for circle cutting accessories.

                    I suggest buying a chunk of say 4x4x1/4" angle iron and setting it up on sawhorses and invest some time just making crosscuts.

                    I don't ever use oxy/acetylene for torch cutting. I use oxy/propane. Much cheaper and also much less popping and if the tip does clog you can take off the outer part and use a point to pick out the slag, none of those dang tip cleaners. And you can lift way off the work with oxypropane. Only drawback is it's hard to start cuz there isn't as much heat.

                    I used to have a Koike Beetle with twelve feet of track. Worked very well but I wound up selling it and buying a cheaper one because the Beetle was too much money sitting on the shelf. Now I have a little Messer Quicky E which I will be getting up and running very soon here. Takes Victor tips.

                    metalmagpie

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                    • #11
                      A very simple but very useful accessory is a very small, worm drive hose clamp that you tighten on the tip at the correct height depending on whatever straight edge you are using.

                      With the clamp maintaining proper altitude, it is much easier to concentrate on consistency of proper travel speed.

                      I does help to run a file down the edge the clamp will ride on, in the quest for that consistently proper travel speed.

                      Dave

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by becksmachine View Post
                        A useful accessory is a small hose clamp that you tighten on the tip at the correct height depending on whatever straight edge you are using. With the clamp maintaining proper altitude, it is easier to concentrate on consistency of travel speed. It does help to run a file down the edge the clamp will ride on, in the quest for that consistent travel speed.
                        Sure. Or shaft collars, whether purchased at the hardware store or made in the shop. - MM

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                        • #13
                          I have a track torch that has a variable speed motor that runs a magnetic drive & it's amazing what a smooth cut you get with the human factor removed.
                          "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                          world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                          country, in easy stages."
                          ~ James Madison

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                          • #14
                            Flange Wizard makes some nice OA magnetic straight edges-

                            http://flangewizard.com/magnetic-torch-guide/
                            I just need one more tool,just one!

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