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How to remove oil cups on lathe saddle ?

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  • How to remove oil cups on lathe saddle ?

    Hi All,

    Do these cups screw in or press in? If pressed in, do I simply thread a bolt in and use a slide hammer? If threaded, how do I remove without scarring up the fake chrome..any more than it already is anyway?

    (IDK the thread pitch off hand, but they are probably 12mm+/- and they have the big plastic screw in caps that are plastic and chrome plated that say "OIL" on them)

    FYI, Restoring a lathe (Cadillac Yam).

    Thanks, Dave




  • #2
    It's hard to tell if they are pressed in or screwed in unless there is some thread visible on the outside under the flange or on the inside below the thread.
    If want to try to pull them out I would make or find something that screws into the thread and gently slide hammer them out.
    Or make a split collar that clamps snuggly around the rime and try to un-screw it.

    JL................

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    • #3
      If it is threaded in, 99% it is a RH thread. I would put a suitably sized 5C collet on it with a collet block and try to turn it. If it just spins, then slide hammer it out.
      https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIF...7S66kX1s8rd0qA

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      • #4
        If they are pressed in, find a deep socket that will fit over the outside of the fitting.
        Find a threaded bolt that is the same thread as the oil fitting and about 1/2" longer than the deep socket.
        Set the socket over the fitting, slide the bolt down thru the socket and start the bolt into the oil fitting. Than start screwing. Work the same as a stuck case remover on a reloading die.

        Check Mcmasters for replacement.

        Hal
        Last edited by Hal; 05-31-2017, 02:06 PM.

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        • #5
          +1 for Hal's method using a jacking bolt.The ones similar to those I have seen were pressed in.
          I just need one more tool,just one!

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          • #6
            Since you don't know whether it is pressed or screwed I would take a bolt with a nut on it, screw the bolt in and then tighten the nut down tight like you were double-nutting it.

            Now try to turn the bolt out, if it is screwed it will turn out and if pressed it will just turn and can now be pulled out and no damage done by a wrong guess..
            Guaranteed not to rust, bust, collect dust, bend, chip, crack or peel

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            • #7
              Thanks guys. Good idea Hal. I will go buy a bolt. I used my thread checkers and it is indeed a M16x1.5

              I'll report back for you guys and for future guys doing this as well.

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              • #8
                Generally, a threaded insert would have some type of drive feature - so it's likely they are pressed in...but you'll find out one way or the other.

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                • #9
                  You might need a washer between the bolt head and the socket.

                  Hal

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                  • #10
                    It will have to be a 3/4 drive socket since the bolt is 16 mm. A piece of heavy wall tubing or pipe will do the trick just as well.

                    Worst comes to worst, a 3/4 inch drilled hole in a chunk of 1 inch bar will do.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by KIMFAB View Post
                      Since you don't know whether it is pressed or screwed I would take a bolt with a nut on it, screw the bolt in and then tighten the nut down tight like you were double-nutting it.

                      Now try to turn the bolt out, if it is screwed it will turn out and if pressed it will just turn and can now be pulled out and no damage done by a wrong guess..
                      That's using the old noggin!

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