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Lathe "practice" stainless steel rebar???

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  • Lathe "practice" stainless steel rebar???

    I haven't turned enough stainless steel to mention. I can get some free 3/4" rebar and I am wondering if this is a decent material to use for practice. Obviously the surface is the same as carbon steel rebar so I will have to get through all the bumps etc. I am also given to understand that the alloy for stainless rebar isn't given and that a non standard standard is used for stainless steel rebar? Thanks for any advice.

  • #2
    NO.. Horrible stuff. It's made by compressing it between rollers so the surface is work hardened and as it's not "round" is basically "interrupted cuts".

    Get some real stock.

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    • #3
      I say go ahead,if you can machine rebar everything else will be a cake walk!

      But seriously,see if a magnet sticks to it.If it doesn't odds are it will be 316LN or XM-28 both of which are Austenitic.If the magnet does stick,then it's most likely 2304 or 2205 Austenitic-Ferritic duplex.

      I machine a good bit of it at work and it's no worse than any other stainless.I don't pass up good,large,rebar (domestic) grade 70 for instance machines nicely and is readily weldable.Our last job we machined and threaded 800+ 1-1/4-7 x 8" threaded ends of grade 60 #11 rebar for a foundation job at a chemical plant.

      Check yours with a file,if the file cuts it,fine.I would suggest knocking the lugs down with a grinder first,just to save cutting edges and time.
      Last edited by wierdscience; 06-03-2017, 09:54 PM.
      I just need one more tool,just one!

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      • #4
        I dont have a chuck I hate enough to start putting that in my lathe..

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        • #5
          You have at least $1000 invested in the lathe, more in tools and the shed, your time is worth 5$ and hour, you just downed a couple of homebrews worth a dollar each and yet you want to save less than $5 on a bit of bar. Why not try making unimportant like a knob for the lawnmower throttle and see how it goes.

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          • #6
            Do they ("THEY", you know THEM, the PTB's, those that control our world and make us puppets dance) actually make SS rebar, that would be freakin' expensive.
            Last edited by loose nut; 06-04-2017, 08:40 AM.
            The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

            Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

            Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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            • #7
              Originally posted by loose nut View Post
              Do they ("THEY", you know THEM, the PTB's, those that control our world and make us puppets dance) actually make SS rebar, that would be freakin' expensive.
              Yes,it's quite common where there is a good chance of exposure to salt and other corrosive agents.It's more expensive than poly or galvanized coated rebar,but the corrosion resistance goes all the way to the core and IIRC it's not THAT much more expensive.

              http://cmcmmi.com/products-services/...FUQcaQodk6kABg
              I just need one more tool,just one!

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              • #8
                A barrel maker up in Canada make a rifle barrel out of regular rebar for a single shot rifle.
                Just to see if he could, I guess.
                Sure looks a little different.

                Hal

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                • #9
                  I've been wanting to do the same,but on a about a .38 revolver.Even have a piece of #6 grade 75 set a side just for the purpose.
                  I just need one more tool,just one!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
                    NO.. Horrible stuff. It's made by compressing it between rollers so the surface is work hardened and as it's not "round" is basically "interrupted cuts".

                    Get some real stock.
                    X4. I'll leave that stuff alone.
                    It wasn't about saving $5.00 BTW. I had no idea that ss rebar was, generally speaking, very difficult to machine. I've read elsewhere on the www that it is bad news so I'll avoid it.
                    Im on the coast of NC and this rebar was purchased at our local metal supplier from the drop pile.
                    Thanks for the tips. When I decide to try machining ss I'll definitely get a known alloy so I can post questions and be able to offer at least that small bit of information.


                    Galaxy S4, Slimkat
                    If I wasn't married I'd quit fishing
                    Last edited by challenger; 06-04-2017, 03:15 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Both me and the Mrs used to work at an Ali works, it closed(probably due to our illicit goings on) anyway a firm came along years later and got a Governent grant to reopen making stainless clad rebar, nothing came of it so I presume it was a good con to get millions in development aid, so far I've never seen stainless clad rebar, haven't seen much solid stainless rebar either, one peice actually.
                      Is it common over the water ?
                      Mark

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                      • #12
                        I've never seen stainless rebar, but that doesn't mean its not out there. I avoid machining regular rebar, so I'd doubly avoid machining stainless rebar. I would think as far as the lathe goes, it would be like driving your mercedes or bmw along railway ties at 100 mph- why would anyone do that?
                        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by challenger View Post
                          X4. I'll leave that stuff alone.
                          It wasn't about saving $5.00 BTW. I had no idea that ss rebar was, generally speaking, very difficult to machine. I've read elsewhere on the www that it is bad news so I'll avoid it.
                          Im on the coast of NC and this rebar was purchased at our local metal supplier from the drop pile.
                          Thanks for the tips. When I decide to try machining ss I'll definitely get a known alloy so I can post questions and be able to offer at least that small bit of information.


                          Galaxy S4, Slimkat
                          If I wasn't married I'd quit fishing
                          I'd say go for it. If your lathe is not smallest tabletop version just cut the surface clean on first pass.
                          Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                          • #14
                            give it a try. if it works ok. if it starts to go south then leave it alone.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by boslab View Post
                              Both me and the Mrs used to work at an Ali works, it closed(probably due to our illicit goings on) anyway a firm came along years later and got a Governent grant to reopen making stainless clad rebar, nothing came of it so I presume it was a good con to get millions in development aid, so far I've never seen stainless clad rebar, haven't seen much solid stainless rebar either, one peice actually.
                              Is it common over the water ?
                              Mark
                              Even the local DIY hardware stores carry it in smaller sizes but I am not sure where it would be used on home construction.
                              Normally used for bridges and such, apparently also for buddhist temples.
                              http://www.outokumpu.com/SiteCollect...r_brochure.pdf
                              Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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