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Lathe "practice" stainless steel rebar???

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  • MattiJ
    replied
    Originally posted by bob308 View Post
    don't use carbide. you will beat it to pieces.
    And I would have said that don't bother to even think about HSS.

    Have to admit that I have never had a change to cut SS rebar on a lathe but it doesn't look any worse than cutting or parting square bar or a big bolt head.

    Cold milled and work hardened is only a plus on my eyes, less gummy than the usual 304.

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  • bob308
    replied
    don't use carbide. you will beat it to pieces.

    Leave a comment:


  • challenger
    replied
    My lathe is a Sheldon exl 10" circa 1954. Not a 5000 lb causing but not an Asian mini lathe.
    I have a very limited amount of carbide insert tooling. I may give it a try but I'm undecided.

    Galaxy S4, Slimkat
    If I wasn't married I'd quit fishing

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  • Mr Fixit
    replied
    Our State Highway Dept. requires it in any project that is exposed to salt air. we even used it for the light pole bases and j bolts to secure the light poles to the footings. I didn't try and machine any but to cut it with the sawzall would go through blades faster than regular re bar, if that tells you anything. If you do try and machine any let us know how it goes.

    TX
    Mr fixit for the family
    Chris

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  • MattiJ
    replied
    Originally posted by boslab View Post
    Both me and the Mrs used to work at an Ali works, it closed(probably due to our illicit goings on) anyway a firm came along years later and got a Governent grant to reopen making stainless clad rebar, nothing came of it so I presume it was a good con to get millions in development aid, so far I've never seen stainless clad rebar, haven't seen much solid stainless rebar either, one peice actually.
    Is it common over the water ?
    Mark
    Even the local DIY hardware stores carry it in smaller sizes but I am not sure where it would be used on home construction.
    Normally used for bridges and such, apparently also for buddhist temples.
    http://www.outokumpu.com/SiteCollect...r_brochure.pdf

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  • bob308
    replied
    give it a try. if it works ok. if it starts to go south then leave it alone.

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  • MattiJ
    replied
    Originally posted by challenger View Post
    X4. I'll leave that stuff alone.
    It wasn't about saving $5.00 BTW. I had no idea that ss rebar was, generally speaking, very difficult to machine. I've read elsewhere on the www that it is bad news so I'll avoid it.
    Im on the coast of NC and this rebar was purchased at our local metal supplier from the drop pile.
    Thanks for the tips. When I decide to try machining ss I'll definitely get a known alloy so I can post questions and be able to offer at least that small bit of information.


    Galaxy S4, Slimkat
    If I wasn't married I'd quit fishing
    I'd say go for it. If your lathe is not smallest tabletop version just cut the surface clean on first pass.

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  • darryl
    replied
    I've never seen stainless rebar, but that doesn't mean its not out there. I avoid machining regular rebar, so I'd doubly avoid machining stainless rebar. I would think as far as the lathe goes, it would be like driving your mercedes or bmw along railway ties at 100 mph- why would anyone do that?

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  • boslab
    replied
    Both me and the Mrs used to work at an Ali works, it closed(probably due to our illicit goings on) anyway a firm came along years later and got a Governent grant to reopen making stainless clad rebar, nothing came of it so I presume it was a good con to get millions in development aid, so far I've never seen stainless clad rebar, haven't seen much solid stainless rebar either, one peice actually.
    Is it common over the water ?
    Mark

    Leave a comment:


  • challenger
    replied
    Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
    NO.. Horrible stuff. It's made by compressing it between rollers so the surface is work hardened and as it's not "round" is basically "interrupted cuts".

    Get some real stock.
    X4. I'll leave that stuff alone.
    It wasn't about saving $5.00 BTW. I had no idea that ss rebar was, generally speaking, very difficult to machine. I've read elsewhere on the www that it is bad news so I'll avoid it.
    Im on the coast of NC and this rebar was purchased at our local metal supplier from the drop pile.
    Thanks for the tips. When I decide to try machining ss I'll definitely get a known alloy so I can post questions and be able to offer at least that small bit of information.


    Galaxy S4, Slimkat
    If I wasn't married I'd quit fishing
    Last edited by challenger; 06-04-2017, 03:15 PM.

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  • wierdscience
    replied
    I've been wanting to do the same,but on a about a .38 revolver.Even have a piece of #6 grade 75 set a side just for the purpose.

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  • Hal
    replied
    A barrel maker up in Canada make a rifle barrel out of regular rebar for a single shot rifle.
    Just to see if he could, I guess.
    Sure looks a little different.

    Hal

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  • wierdscience
    replied
    Originally posted by loose nut View Post
    Do they ("THEY", you know THEM, the PTB's, those that control our world and make us puppets dance) actually make SS rebar, that would be freakin' expensive.
    Yes,it's quite common where there is a good chance of exposure to salt and other corrosive agents.It's more expensive than poly or galvanized coated rebar,but the corrosion resistance goes all the way to the core and IIRC it's not THAT much more expensive.

    http://cmcmmi.com/products-services/...FUQcaQodk6kABg

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  • loose nut
    replied
    Do they ("THEY", you know THEM, the PTB's, those that control our world and make us puppets dance) actually make SS rebar, that would be freakin' expensive.
    Last edited by loose nut; 06-04-2017, 08:40 AM.

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  • Baz
    replied
    You have at least $1000 invested in the lathe, more in tools and the shed, your time is worth 5$ and hour, you just downed a couple of homebrews worth a dollar each and yet you want to save less than $5 on a bit of bar. Why not try making unimportant like a knob for the lawnmower throttle and see how it goes.

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