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Waaaay OT: "Machinist" not what I thought it meant.

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  • Waaaay OT: "Machinist" not what I thought it meant.

    Per this article in the Register...
    "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

  • #2
    It's unfortunate that a Mach-inist sounds like machosist is similar to a machine-ist, but it's undeniably true we do love our machines, some like little slim atlases some love the giant asses on a monarch, it's sooo pervy we should all be locked in our shops to onanise as we see fit, mind the chips in that headstock bore.
    Mark

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    • #3
      In the UK, a "Machinist" operates a sewing machine. One who works with lathes and milling machines etc would be a Precision Engineer, or a Toolmaker.
      Man who say it cannot be done should not disturb man doing it! https://www.youtube.com/user/philhermetic/videos?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by hermetic View Post
        In the UK, a "Machinist" operates a sewing machine. One who works with lathes and milling machines etc would be a Precision Engineer, or a Toolmaker.
        Out of interest, what does the title turner and fitter signify.

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        • #5
          A turner is someone who runs a lathe, production or jobshop. Fitters fit parts to fix things and aren't expected to fabricate things, so commonly mechanics are described as fitters. Or you have plant fitters, maintenance fitters etc.
          A toolmaker is one of those rarefied types who operate in the toolroom and can work to close precision and tight tolerances and do prototype work. Make the tools to make the tools sort of thing.

          Two of my sisters were machinists

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