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Cetus3D printer

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  • mattthemuppet
    replied
    from here:

    https://www.cetus3d.com/shop/index.p...&product_id=74

    it's pretty unlikely that I'll need that extra volume, just figured that it was unlikely I'd save much if I tried to DIY it later if I needed it. Still, never know what the kids might dream up, one of them is nuts about dragons..

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  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    Really? I ordered on their web site and the picture of the extended version took me to a place holder type page. No way to order it. Where did you order yours?

    In any case, I wanted to hold the expenditure down for now so I am happy with getting the smaller version. I just hope I can get the upgrade kit later.



    Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
    Paul, I don't know where you ordered yours from but the mk2 extended version is available. That's the one I ordered.

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  • gld
    replied
    Would like to hear some reports on the use of Cetus heated print bed. Been thinking about one myself.

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  • ironmonger
    replied
    @Max McG

    I have been waiting to get into this stuff for a while, and though it may be ambitious, I want to use PLA to make a pattern for investment casting. I would prolly use PLA but I am certainly open to suggestions for a superior material.

    As far as upgrading or repairing the machine if the manufacturer abandons you is concerned, if it has steppers the worst case would be adding a new controller and buying a new print head wouldn't it?

    Leave a comment:


  • RB211
    replied
    I've only been printing ABS for the past few months. My heated bed is set to 100c, extruder 250c. I do not have an enclosure, but make sure not to run the ceiling fan above. Layers less than .2mm are problematic for me with ABS.
    I want to try Polymaker PC-Max, which is Poly Carbonate, stronger than ABS without the shrinkage issues of ABS. Ordered some, but was sent PLA instead which made me extremely grumpy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Max McGrumpy
    replied
    Look at the Ninja-Tek line of materials, put out by Fenner Drives. Made in America, and traceable to. These guys are the go-to for flex materials for printing.

    Taluman is the leading supplier of polyester (PETG) and nylon alloys for 3D printing. Again... same as Fenner Drives. American made and traceable too.

    For chemical resistant applications you'll want to look at the chemicals closely and look up a compatibility chart. Nylon has a certain range of chemical resists, ABS does as well, the good PLAs have their niche, the PETG group has it's uses...

    ABS printing, you'll need to heat the bed to between 100 and 110c. Throw a box over the machine or build a fancy enclosure... this helps contain the heat. ABS shrinks like a mofo as it cools, that's where 99% of the problem comes from. Knowing this you'll have to take it into account when designing parts. Long flat sections for example will shrink up and warp. Sharp corners are right out as they will cause issues.

    A good PLA-PHA alloy has properties similar to ABS at a lower heat resistance... I use PLA-PHA in place of most materials these days unless a specific application calls for a specific material.

    That brings up another possibility -- with a dual head printer you can print the inside of the part out of a filler material, and the outer shells out of a hard durable resistant material. With the proper settings the layers are perfectly sealed, and you've just saved a crapton of money.

    You can also make performance structures the same way... Two different durometer elastomer materials over a hard ABS inner core... Done it.

    >>>--- its hard to contain my excitement with this process. It can do so much, if the users are of a mind to do so. I see people buy cheap machines with cheap materials... they print a Yoda head off of the web and ditch it.

    It's like any other tool in our shops. You get out of it what you put into it.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    I'd want to run ABS, simply because the current project here involves prototypes of a part used in an environment where the other parts in the system are made of either ABS, or PVC, and PVC ain't happening in a printer. Parts will get wet, and may see other chemicals, so consumer crapinium is not an option for protos that will need testing. (Final parts will be injection molded in prodution)

    For ABS I seem to need a heated bed, and an enclosure to prevent too much of a draft coming through. Anything else?

    Is it possible to do the print process with something having properties similar to regular black rubber of a medium-soft durometer?

    Leave a comment:


  • Max McGrumpy
    replied
    I love how people declare one material superior to others without understanding the properties of said materials.

    Polycarb? Really? Good luck printing that. I mean it can be done, so can nylon. But for the majority of work that gets done on machines like this PLA alloys and ABS are the staple materials. This is based on performance and the range of properties they offer.

    If your PLA isn't performing you may want to look at the new alloys and blends, you get what you pay for. $9.50 bulk-rate Chinesium PLA is going to be exactly as good as the equilvent Chinesium scrapbinium alloy that you attempt to run in your lathe... the $10 stick of stock that you want to make mirror-finish performance automotive parts out of... the same material that alternately runs as if it is 95% cheese and then suddenly goes hard and destroys an insert-tool worth several hundred bucks.

    I've offered in the past to help people navigate the world of plastic, but it often comes down to "phsst whatever" and "cost" and "does it come in blue?" so... if you have any questions regarding 3D printer materials now is the time to ask.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ridgerunner
    replied
    Mine is the extended version as well. It should be noted that the heated bed requires a power supply for ABS temperatures unless things have changed since I got mine.

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  • mattthemuppet
    replied
    Paul, I don't know where you ordered yours from but the mk2 extended version is available. That's the one I ordered.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    Well, I ordered one last night. The original, 7x7x7 model as the extended version does not seem to be available yet. I hope they can do the upgrade kit later. Now the wait for delivery.

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  • mattthemuppet
    replied
    Just as a side note I'm pretty sure you can use simplify3d with the cetus now

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    So, what does it cost to get into one that is NOT a "dead end"?

    And, if the one in this thread is indeed "tied to its own software", why is that a problem if it works and does what it should?

    Leave a comment:


  • mattthemuppet
    replied
    Originally posted by Max McGrumpy View Post
    There are indeed materials that can do that. Specific materials for casting as well.

    As for that machine, I'm glad people are enjoying it but...

    ..its a dead end. Special nozzles, tethered to software, propitiatory extruder, no information on the board or firmware...

    For the price it's a good starter machine. But if you really want to do more than 3D print casually, look for something like the Creality CR10 and related designs. Everything on there from the board to the nozzles can be replaced with other components for ease of repair or upgrading.

    And it runs on software like Simplify 3D, CURA, Matter Control, KISS, Slic3r... So no worries about that.
    That's for sure, but one has to start somewhere I had also considered the prusa due to rb211's recommendation, but the price was just a bit too much to reach.

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  • RB211
    replied
    Originally posted by Max McGrumpy View Post
    There are indeed materials that can do that. Specific materials for casting as well.

    As for that machine, I'm glad people are enjoying it but...

    ..its a dead end. Special nozzles, tethered to software, propitiatory extruder, no information on the board or firmware...

    For the price it's a good starter machine. But if you really want to do more than 3D print casually, look for something like the Creality CR10 and related designs. Everything on there from the board to the nozzles can be replaced with other components for ease of repair or upgrading.

    And it runs on software like Simplify 3D, CURA, Matter Control, KISS, Slic3r... So no worries about that.
    Prusa i3 mk3 looks really nice, will be upgrading mine to the 2.5 standard when able. Prusa does a lot of R&D, and is the first for many new things. The mk3 has a flexible steel print surface that is powder coated with PEI, which he had to invent. It's held down flat with magnets. When done printing, lift off the printing surface and flex it a bit.
    You need a heated bed for ABS. PLA is really a poor material for many things. Polymaker PC max is supposed to be really nice, better than ABS in every way, except price. It is a polycarbonate that is stronger than ABS, without the the shrinking issues of ABS.

    Leave a comment:

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