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What do you think of these I-beam splices?

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  • What do you think of these I-beam splices?

    These will support a new scoreboard at the local stadium. IT'S NOT MY WELDING OR MY DESIGN.







    Yeah, they're about one inch out of alignment at the top.

    There are splice plates on both sides.
    Last edited by winchman; 06-05-2017, 01:54 AM.
    Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

  • #2
    Looks better than my welds

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    • #3
      I think for vertical use it will be fine, but I wouldn't use them for horizontal use bearing a load.

      Just my inexperienced opinion. I'll be interested to hear from the guys that actually have some
      experience with this.
      John Titor, when are you.

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm more concerned about wind loads, which will load the beams in a way that's similar to what they'd see in a typical horizontal situation. It's going to have a lot of exposed area.

        Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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        • #5
          I blew up your second pic to see what the welds looked like as best I could and while I'm not a welder, my 2 cent opinion is that those do not appear to be good welds.
          Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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          • #6
            I don't think a microburst would have any effect on them. Even a crappy looking weld can be very strong.

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            • #7
              It looks to me as if they've fished the least-stressed part (the web) and merely butt-welded the flanges.
              Why?
              This can't have been designed by a qualified engineer, surely? Somebody please prove me wrong!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Mike Burch View Post
                It looks to me as if they've fished the least-stressed part (the web) and merely butt-welded the flanges.
                Why?
                Thats what I was also thinking.
                Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                • #9
                  Not impressed, no flanges, undersized web plate, the things would have been safer if a standard bolted junction had been employed ( details in any structural steel handbook), no dye penetrant test of the welds, all in all a could do better, question is who is going to assume liability if the thing fails, not saying it's going to but where the thing could injure or kill someone you really must do the job to the best of your ability and try to exceed the standards in the relevant legislation, stated standards being the minimum, I think it would be worthwhile to get a structural steel company to inspect it and recommend any improvements needed, they will know the regulations need, fortunately it wouldent be difficult to add a bolted coupler with a mag drill.
                  Mark
                  http://www.steelconstruction.info/Co...ed_connections
                  Last edited by boslab; 06-05-2017, 05:13 AM.

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                  • #10
                    If the cap welds are done well the joints will be fine. Perhaps the plates were done by someone different than the butt welds.

                    After all some of the most critical welds are well done butt welds. Pipelines for example.
                    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                    • #11
                      They look new so why not buy the correct length? Were they engineered or just guessed at? A scoreboard can catch a huge wind load. I have 4 15"x22' that are made to lock & bolt together to make 44'ers that have way thicker top plates & I bet webs also.

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                      • #12
                        My fund of lore suggests that welded butt joints on structural steel beams should be kept in the outer 1/4 of the span. The greatest stress is at the center. A casual construction site weld like patch plates webs and plain butt welded flanges (scab low penetration weld over no prep) won't develop the strength of an uninterrupted beam. Gotta crank in a big safety factor. If the beam is loaded 1/240 deflection etc I would imagine a sound construction site weld would be adequate but it's an engineering call if you are of the belt and suspended persuasion.

                        Laterally supported columns are not subjected to sway load. Buckling may be a factor in a welded joint outside of a floor or brace intersection. Another engineering call.

                        I'm not a fan of patch plates in welded structures. More often than not a patch plate is a warm fuzzy implementation concealing dubious workmanship, joint prep (Cope the joint work a 100% weld and you don't need patch plates!) design, or numbskull job planning. They look impressive but they add weight and in no case add to the reliability of the joint. Bolted connections are a different story but still much depends on how they are executed and where they are placed.
                        Last edited by Forrest Addy; 06-05-2017, 01:25 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Arcane View Post
                          I blew up your second pic to see what the welds looked like as best I could and while I'm not a welder, my 2 cent opinion is that those do not appear to be good welds.
                          I have to agree, the welds do not look too good. I'm sure they lack the proper penetration. From what shows in the picture the steel was never ground clean prior to welding, that doesn't help any either.

                          As far as the plates, they are a little to small and should have had more of an overlap. Better yet, if it were me I would have cut out some triangles or shapes in the plates and welded around the inside of them to give more plate to beam weld area.

                          JL................

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                          • #14
                            Instead of union weldors,
                            they got the good ol' boy's club.
                            Should be fine.

                            -D
                            DZER

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                            • #15
                              Proof that anybody can bid and get the job.

                              Are those columns set in concrete?That's a no-no if they are,also why are they making field joints?And why did they cap pass with 60xx?Why didn't they fabricate everything for standard erection with bolted joints?Why not galvanized?Why not just buy a pre-fabricated scroreboard tower like 95% of the installations nationwide do?

                              Rank amateurs.
                              I just need one more tool,just one!

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