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  • FNG Here

    Hey guys!
    I am brand spankin new to Machining. I watched a AVE and This Old Tony vid and said... HEY if they can do it so can I... Anyways I just picked up a Craftsman 109 to learn on and just cleaning the machine I have learned a lot. If anybody has any experience using one and tips or tricks other than start over its greatly appreciated. Now forgive this next NOOB question but it doesn't have any degree indicators or anyway of telling what is where... any tips or advice to "upgrade" this?
    "If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not for you."

  • #2
    Originally posted by PlanlosChannel View Post
    AvE
    Don't take notes too closely from him.

    Welcome.

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    • #4
      Recent FNG myself..welcome aboard..
      A few tips. Learn the ruler method of getting tool on center height.
      Get the SouthBend How to Run a Lathe Book..yes, even if yours is not a SouthBend.
      Write CS X 4 over Dia on the wall behind your lathe and learn about it.
      Expect to learn how to grind tools.
      The amount you learn will probably be directly proportional to the amount if REAL EFFORT you put into it.
      Good Luck...

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      • #5
        Add your location to your profile so we know where you are and there maybe members here close to you that can get you started right.

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        • #6
          Get yourself a good face shield like this. I find it comfortable to mostly forget about, which is what you want safety equipment to do.
          https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B001VY3ACE

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          • #7
            Originally posted by mf205i View Post
            You might find these links interesting or useful

            [snip]

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cBYQmaeI-VU Watch all of the Tubalcain videos.

            [snip]

            And don’t forget to download your FREE copy of Machinery’s handbook. Edition 5. http://books.google.com/books?id=VkEYAAAAYAAJ

            Have fun, Mike
            5'th edition Machinery's handbook? Is that the edition where they have proper pressure angles for knapping flint knives?

            I completely agree with watching all of Tubalcain.... although you might start with the lathe and hand operation, and save the milling machine ones for later.

            Somebody else who I recommend is "That Lazy Machinist", Marc L'Cuyer. https://www.youtube.com/user/THATLAZ...NIST/playlists He is a certified tool and instrument maker from Canada (or some such certification), and teaches at a high school or technical school. He put together a few hundred videos on basic operations and teaches at a level which is perfectly appropriate for noobs. He hasn't been as active lately since he was diagnosed with cancer, so lets subscribe and show him some love.

            Finally, I'd like to pass on one of the best bits of advice I got here (or somewhere) - Don't be afraid to waste metal. Go to the recycling place, the junk yard, the local metal shop and ask for cheap "drops", etc., and get a bunch of metal cheap. Don't start learning by doing a project that requires to you use a bar of O1 you bought from McMaster for $50 (plus S&H). Instead, use cheap metal you can throw away if/when Mr Bozo comes to visit.

            You might start with L'Cuyer's positioning hammer project.... It's five videos that lead you step by step in making a useful shop tool https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUPl...4MoU7pzJx09zS2

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            • #8
              Welcome to the Forum!

              Wow! You guys sure pile on the homework. It's Summer, man!

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              • #9
                welcome fng
                https://www.flickr.com/photos/csprecision

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                • #10
                  Welcome, you may try, How to run a lathe. It is a South Bend book but has much useful info.

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                  • #11
                    Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
                    Welcome to the Forum!

                    Wow! You guys sure pile on the homework. It's Summer, man!
                    Back when I used to teach summer school I would do this little bit of math on the blackboard (black board, see how long ago this was).

                    Regular school = 3 quarters at 12 weeks/quarter = 36 weeks. 3 lectures/week = 108 lecture hours (- a few)
                    Summer school = 11 weeks. So, to cover the same number of lectures in 11 weeks it is 108/11 is about 10 hours/week of lecture, 5 days/week, 2 hours a day.
                    Suggested reading - 3 hours/lecture hour. == 6 hours a day.
                    Homework - 2 - 3 hours a day.

                    Total = 11 hours per day for this course alone.

                    Jokingly I would say that if they had scheduled 2 summer classes they would have to plan carefully to fit 4 hours of sleep a day into their schedules...

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                    • #12
                      Originally posted by Dan_the_Chemist View Post
                      5'th edition Machinery's handbook? Is that the edition where they have proper pressure angles for knapping flint knives?
                      [/URL]
                      I have the set of books that were 12 complete books before being condensed into the tiny print single book. I think 1912 or 1913, much easier to read & the same material in the same order & the same name..
                      "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                      world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                      country, in easy stages."
                      ~ James Madison

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                      • #13
                        I work at the county dump so my supply is basically unlimited. LOL
                        "If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not for you."

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                        • #14
                          Hey thanks for the warm welcome guys! I work at the local Transfer station so I get all kinds of amazing things in at work all the time... Hoping to make my own projects but my first goal is not killing myself or killing the machine.
                          "If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not for you."

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                          • #15
                            A good YouTube person to see is MrPete222 . Search " Tublicain " or mrpete.
                            He is a former highschool machine shop teacher. He has over 700 videos where he teaches lathe turning and mill. He also has project videos making tools for the machine. He has a whole series on Craftsman "Atlas" lathes. Very good videos to watch and also sells them as a learning series.

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