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  • #16
    Witness the birth of a 108 tooth gear. This was the largest gear I could make on my old milling machine. After checking my set-up in the new milling machine, I could make a much larger gear if I had to. 108 teeth is a lot of cranking the table back and forth. Fortunately it only has to travel about 1 1/2". Big sigh of relief when I got all the way around to the first cut and was only cutting air. This particular set-up required using 15 holes on an 18 hole divider plate attached to the input side of the rotary table.
    Brian Rupnow
    Design engineer
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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    • #17
      Well, so far,so good. I'm almost finished with the metal stuff. I have 3 or 4 holes to drill thru the brass gear to hold it to that bottom plate that it is setting on. Once that is done, I have to start carving on that wooden center post to create a "seat" for the gearmotor to set on.
      Brian Rupnow
      Design engineer
      Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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      • #18
        I was also worried about the power cord, but you explained that. Sounds like a fun project.

        I would have wimped out and used a belt drive.There is no real need for gears here. But knock yourself out making them.
        Paul A.
        SE Texas

        And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
        You will find that it has discrete steps.

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        • #19
          cool project! I'm always impressed by people who can make gears, looks like it opens up a whole 'nuther avenue of making stuff.

          Did you make the wooden outer part too? I love the different types of wood, looks very pretty.

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          • #20
            Making gears such as these, are not really that difficult. Even easier if you buy the cutter. Making the cutter, that gets involved..tricky.
            Most of gear cutting is just reading, thinking it through, following procedures..PRECISELY......
            Take your time, its actually sort if fun.
            If you are clever, it can at times be done without a dividing head or buying gear cutters.
            Keep in mind, we are talking low speed gears.

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            • #21
              Matt--Like I said in the first post, the fellow who owns the trophy made the trophy. I am just providing the elements to power it. I wouldn't go so far as to say making gears is easy, but if you invest about $500 you can buy a complete set of 8 gear cutters (for a specific diametral pitch).
              Brian Rupnow
              Design engineer
              Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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              • #22
                And now you know how I spent 8 hours of this day.
                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3qiC0TYOh8
                Brian Rupnow
                Design engineer
                Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                • #23
                  And yes, it is indeed a very Canadian trophy. The guy who made this is a real craftsman in wood.
                  Brian Rupnow
                  Design engineer
                  Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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