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Interesting project--Machining content

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  • Interesting project--Machining content

    I have a friend who is a world class snooker player, and a very talented woodworker. He has just returned from a tournament in England and came to me with an interesting request. He has worked many hours over the past year crafting a beautiful snooker trophy, with names of tournament champions displayed around it's circumference. I'm not sure where this trophy will be displayed, but he has just discovered that it is going to be displayed behind a glass "wall" to protect it from theft/vandalism. Great security, but it completely defeats the purpose of a "cylindrical" trophy. Nobody will be able to see the names displayed on the side opposite the security glass. He wanted to know if I could "motorize" it so that it would revolve when someone pushed a button on the wall. Buried in one of my cupboards is a small 12 volt d.c. gearmotor out of something on an automobile. Since the motor will be completely hidden inside the revolving trophy, it can't turn constantly, as it would have no way to dissipate the heat it would build up. However, for short duration runs it would be just the cats meow. I told him that I can cut a couple of gears, one a 15 tooth and one a 108 tooth 25dp and install everything inside the trophy. The revolving part sets on a large diameter "lazy Susan" bearing but the center-post is stationary, so there is hardly any load on the motor. So---For a break from my Rockerblock project, this is where I'm going. The transparent outline is the body of the trophy. The red part is the 12 volt gearmotor. the yellow and green are the gears I will cut later this week.
    Brian Rupnow

  • #2
    Cool idea. I've made a couple trophy's and always enjoyed the work. Wish I could get more of it, but always happy to get what I can. Be sure to post pics of the finished trophy please.

    Side note, you should have hooked up one of your engines outside the case, to spin the trophy via some shafts and pulleys ha ha.

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    • #3
      Brian, I know that you like cutting gears, but would a BBQ spit drive not achieve the same end with less effort? just a thought.
      Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

      Comment


      • #4
        There are commercial display turntables available.

        Comment


        • #5
          Hey guy's

          What fun is there in buying it? Isn't this a HSM request and exactly what a HSM loves to be challenged with. I say, Brian you are an artist when it comes to your engines and the design, go for it, and as said earlier please post a pic of what the end result is.

          TX
          Mr fixit for the family
          Chris

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          • #6
            I think this is well, within Brians skill set, go for it if you feel like it..
            Not sure you have both cutters you need, but it would work anyway.
            I think to those that have not yet done it, gear cutting may seem like an obstacle , but I think its a good confidence booster.
            Even in pre apprentice school, they made us cut a gear..except we used a wood blank to save the cutter.
            Lovely little HARRISON horizontal we used for that..

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            • #7
              I have a complete set of 25 diametral pitch cutters. There are either 7 or 8 cutters in a set, and they cost a small fortune. The trophy was finished before any thought was given to adding a motor to it, and the space available is very restricted.
              Brian Rupnow

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              • #8
                A trophy with a power cord hanging out of it? I'd put it on a turntable instead.

                allan

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                • #9
                  The amount of time you put into making one will be worth a lot more than $30. These things are easily available commercially. This model...

                  https://www.amazon.com/Motorized-Dis...ized+turntable

                  can handle a 20 kg load.
                  Regards, Marv

                  Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
                  http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

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                  • #10
                    Yes, Brian could buy a turntable and place it on that. And in the end, all you would have is a trophy on a turntable, nice and tacky. By integrating
                    the rotational function into the trophy it makes for a more interesting piece. I'm looking forward to see how it turns out.

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                    • #11
                      So how is the power cord going to be accommodated?

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                      • #12
                        The pedestal that holds the base of the lazy Susan bearing is stationary. The 3 1/2" vertical post you see in the transparent model is stationary. The outer shell is what turns. The power cord will be ran thru holes drilled in the stationary part of the trophy.
                        Brian Rupnow

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                        • #13
                          Marv, your not wrong. The price I quoted him to do it is absolutely horrifying, but he wants me to do it. He is a good friend, and hopefully I will be able to give him a considerable price break. It all comes down to hours spent. Material cost is about $40. I quoted him two full days of my time.
                          Brian Rupnow

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                          • #14
                            Okay--Somebody wanted to see more of this---we have more. In the lathe is a piece of dirty old 1018 steel cold rolled round-bar that has been turned to the outer diameter of the gear and the outer diameter of the hub, and bored 8mm, all in the same set-up to guarantee concentricity. For those among you who have really sharp eyes, you will see that the description of the part in the title-block calls up a different bore than 8 mm. I am aware of that. At the last minute I figured out that I really needed an 8 mm bore to suit the shaft on the small d.c. gearmotor, but I didn't go back in and change the description of the part. The gear is not parted off from the parent stock, because I need something to hold onto with the chuck in my rotary table when I cut the teeth in the gear. after the teeth are cut, then it goes back into the lathe to be parted off.

                            Brian Rupnow

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                            • #15
                              Here we have the teeth cut into the gear blank. It was then taken back to the lathe, parted off, and attached to the gearmotor shaft with J.B. weld. The gearmotor shaft had a number of fine splines on its outer diameter, and a flat as well. Why is the plastic business card there? I didn't want to J.B. weld the gear to the motor housing, so I drilled an 8 mm hole thru the business card, slipped it over the shaft first, then slathered the shaft with j.b. weld and slid the gear on. After it sets up for 24 hours, I will trim away the business card.

                              Brian Rupnow

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