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OT dangers of modern refrigerants.

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  • #16
    I used some of this stuff in my old Lincoln. It worked great until it seeped out. I couldn't find a leak. Someone told me the molecules of this gas are so small they pass through the walls of the hose. Don't know if I believe that or not.
    The stuff is flammable but can't burn or explode within the closed system. Even if you have a slow leak what harm can it cause??

    JL..............

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    • #17
      You folks are saying a lot about the flammability.... Do you have vinyl siding on your house?

      Not all of that siding is flame retardant... And flame retardant does not mean it will not burn if it is hot enough from another source. Flame retardant just means that if it is the only thing burning, it should go out in a certain time. If there is already a fire, siding can go up too.

      New houses with "engineered beams" as floor joists may give you as little as 2 or 3 minutes to get out before the floor collapses from a fire in the basement. Those are the beams with a thin strip of wood top and bottom, and chipboard in between.

      Lots of dangers built right into new hoses.
      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

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      • #18
        I remember being slightly concerned over the choice of refrigerant in my fridges when I bought them, one is 10 years old and the other is 3 years. As I am rather arthritic, I wont be dragging them out to confirm the exact spec, R134A being a likely candidate.
        In post #3, I related how easily I punctured a very small refrigerator, if there had been even 1/2 pound of butane leaking out in a few seconds in a typical small kitchen 9x6, it would be quite a fireball. Look what "The mother of all bombs" can achieve.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by old mart View Post
          I remember being slightly concerned over the choice of refrigerant in my fridges when I bought them, one is 10 years old and the other is 3 years. As I am rather arthritic, I wont be dragging them out to confirm the exact spec, R134A being a likely candidate.
          In post #3, I related how easily I punctured a very small refrigerator, if there had been even 1/2 pound of butane leaking out in a few seconds in a typical small kitchen 9x6, it would be quite a fireball. Look what "The mother of all bombs" can achieve.
          Like I said, Maybe 80 grams but not nearly as much as half a pound.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
            I used some of this stuff in my old Lincoln. It worked great until it seeped out. I couldn't find a leak. Someone told me the molecules of this gas are so small they pass through the walls of the hose. Don't know if I believe that or not.
            JL..............
            Back when R12 was used in cars, the outer jacket of the hoses was usually perforated to keep them from ballooning. When the EPA got involved and R134A was made mandatory, they forced a change in the hose construction to reduce leakage through the hose wall. If you look at the old and new hoses inner liner, the difference is obvious.


            RWO

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