Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

New Shop equipment suggestions?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • New Shop equipment suggestions?

    Ladies and gents - just signing on to the site. Total neophyte looking to learn. I want to set up a small (6'x6' area?) hobby shop with welding, milling, drilling, turning capabilities. I can't see myself turning/milling anything bigger than my fist and usually about half that size nor welding anything bigger than a brief case. Materials - steel (10xx,41xx and tool steels), brass, possibly copper. I have a hacksaw (that I can use) and a gas rig (which a might be able to use). I'm looking for suggestions and directions on types of tools (hand and power).

    Bill

  • #2
    Check out Little Machine Shop - www.littlemachineshop.com. They will have the small size affordable mill and lathe you want with accessories, parts and support. For welding, a small mig or tig machine would be a nice addition to the torch. A 4 x 6 inch capacity bandsaw would be great too. It may be a bit challenging to do all that in a 6 x 6 foot space, though.
    Kansas City area

    Comment


    • #3
      Welcome. I found YouTube handy. You can see the various tools in use and decide which ones are likely to be useful to you. Books are also great. Once you start making stuff, you will know when you need a new tool. Some people get by with very little, others like to have the exact tool for the job. With only 6 X 6, I would choose carefully. Buying is easy, finding a place for everything can be a challenge.

      Bigger is generally better with machines (up to a point). But don't stuff in the biggest machine you can fit without considering the space needed for accessories. Bigger machines generally have bigger accessories to take advantage of their extra capacity.

      On the other hand, I doubt that any of the smaller machines can work to their maximum capacity. For example, this video shows a guy trying to turn a 5" piece of aluminium on a 7" lathe. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8X-PuLm9XQU

      Do not try to learn anything from that video apart from seeing the problems he has working on a large part. I hate to be critical, but that guy shouldn't be making machining videos. Nothing wrong with being a beginner, but he should learn correct/safe technique before he publishes content for all to see.

      Comment


      • #4
        I personally don't think 6x6 is going to make it. Even if you get a small table top mill and lathe and set them on a
        bench, you are about done. No more room for YOU ... and a welder, or much else. Being someone that started
        out using 3-in-1's, let me say I don't recommend that route. Although, if you are absolutely restricted to that size,
        you may have too.

        But you came to the right place. Welcome
        John Titor, when are you.

        Comment


        • #5
          Chris/Clickspring has about double that space (5.5' X 12.5'). It's cosy. Two lathes and two mills though, so it could work with one lathe and mill.

          Comment


          • #6
            Many people use the table top machines that Little machine shop sells in small spaces. If you seriously have only a 6x6 space, you will need to think about machines that can be stored when not in use. A 7x14 lathe can be stored under the bench when you need that space for the mini mill. The mini mill will fit under the bench when the lathe is in use.

            I would not suggest trying to weld in a space that small. By the time you add work benches, storage cabinets, etc the welding area becomes cramped. Stray sparks and white hot splatter will be hard to contain unless you set aside a large part of that 6x6 for a welding booth.

            I do most of my MIG welding outside next to the house. That gives me a large area that is just concrete and stucco. I do TIG welding inside the garage in a cleared area.

            Dan
            At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

            Location: SF East Bay.

            Comment


            • #7
              I'd say that once you get to where you want to graduate from cutting all your stock with a hacksaw, a Porta-band type bandsaw is a great tool if the work pieces tend to be small and you have a good vice. Super versatile tool.

              As for welding, if you are sure you want that capability one of the small inverter TIG units may be a good route. Longer learning curve on TIG, but it is very versatile and if you take suitable containment and ventilation precautions you can do it indoors. Also you can stick weld with them if you are able to work outside. Not as quick to learn as a small MIG machine, but it will take you a lot longer to outgrow it I think.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by berklich View Post
                I want to set up a small (6'x6' area?) hobby shop with welding, milling, drilling, turning capabilities.

                Bill

                Welding only..... yes

                Machining only....... yes

                Both in 6'x6' would be ridiculous

                If you could see a pic of everyone's workshop who is on this forum, you would see a common theme..... not enough room. If you have the ability to expand down the line a bit, then you might be ok. To me it would be a exercise in futility, the ole 10 gallons of stuff in a 5 gallon bucket.


                ME

                Comment


                • #9
                  16' by 16' would be a small shop.

                  6' by 6' is a coffin.

                  Try to find more space.
                  Gary


                  Appearance is Everything...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Michael Edwards View Post
                    Welding only..... yes

                    Machining only....... yes

                    Both in 6'x6' would be ridiculous

                    If you could see a pic of everyone's workshop who is on this forum, you would see a common theme..... not enough room. If you have the ability to expand down the line a bit, then you might be ok. To me it would be a exercise in futility, the ole 10 gallons of stuff in a 5 gallon bucket.


                    ME
                    I'd quess its possible if one wants to work on weeny stuff like models or something. More like match box size parts maximum...
                    Proxxon mf70 sized toy mill (or aciera f1), similar iny lathe and small dc tig inverter for welding.
                    Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Pretty high fire risk to weld in that size space..

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        It's all in how you work, I think. Remember "Luna" the woman who posted on here a while back, doing stuff like building 1911's and revolvers from scratch on a few machines set up on the back porch of the house? I'm not sure the space she had was a great deal larger.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          What she was doing was safe enjoyable fun.
                          Welding with all that in there, can burn the building down..

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            You need to just think inside the box. First rule is buy/rent by the square ft and use it by the cubic ft! My homebuilt CNC has a 30" x 60" footprint with a full enclosure and is 6' tall. On top lives the shop vac, very important in a small shop. Underneath is a hand tool box next to the computer. A roll out flip top tool cart with 3 drawers holds all the tooling, second spindle, granite angle plate and some fixturing. Top open is where stuff sits while machining. Close the top it's a workbench and I have a Walmart folding stool. If I had a welder it would be Tig because it is universal for all metals if it is AC/DC and does not throw sparks like stick or mig. I have a large Milwaukee Portaband on a Swag Offroad table that makes it a vertical metal cutting saw. It lives on top of the CNC and gets used sitting on a foldup workmate table that stores on the left end of the CNC. The air compressor for misting, tires and small air tools is on top of the CNC too.
                            Start with a mill not a lathe. Way more stuff you can do with a mill as it replaces a drill press and a lathe because it IS a lathe! I have a CNC mill at home, had a Bridgeport, and have a Servo 5000 bed mill at work, all fitted with a lathe chuck on the spindle. A bracket bolts to the front of the table using the slots for the end stops. A Quick Change toolpost on the front of the bracket allows parts that fit the chuck to be quite long because they clear the edge of the table. I made a tapered holder to allow all the tool holders for drills and chucks to mount to the front of the table too. We often stick the lathe chuck in that holder to mill on the end of round parts too.
                            So I've only used less than half of the space you have so far. Use the cube, put some high shelving on the opposite wall if there is one, as well as over the door and back wall. That is where the very important bench grinder lives. A small belt/disk sander up on the shelf is nice for deburring parts. A low shelf below can store long materials. Use every square inch of wall space to hang thin stuff.
                            So what are going to be making?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Honestly my first shop was 6x6. Ianly did 3d printing there and soldering as well as had a single work bench and a PC. I can see a space like that having small benchtop lathe and mill. The welding I agree will be a bit hazardous. You could try to build a small ventilated box to weld into. Maybe a bit of Tig to reduce splatter. With that said, I agree take the welding outside. The machines I agree with. A welding shop in the house? Nope.
                              12x16" Delta 3d printer (Built from scratch)
                              Logan 825 - work in progress
                              My Blog - http://engineerd3d.ddns.net/
                              Youtube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVY...view_as=public
                              Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/engineerd3d/?hl=en

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X