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Old pedal lathe info

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  • Old pedal lathe info

    A friend has inherited an old, pedal lathe. Can anyone provide info on it and potential value? Thanks.
    Jim






  • #2
    I'm odd, that's a thing of beauty, that's one way to learn how to sharpen tools!
    Mark

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    • #3
      If only the drive wheel wasn't missing. I'll bet it had wonderfully shaped serpentine spokes.

      No idea of value since such things are so strongly influenced by the lure to the buyer. But there's little doubt that the drive wheel absence will highly affect the price. It's hard to tell too if the metal is bare or if it's done in a grey paint that has aged to where it looks like bare metal. If the original paint was removed that will strongly affect the desirability to a collector and reduces it down to someone that is more interested in a restoration and possible use or display as more a curio than an actual antique.
      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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      • #4
        I can't say much about value as I have no clue, but the first lathe work I ever did was on a similar machine, although that one had a fairly large flywheel with a freewheeling capability. The cuts where light, but within it's capability it allowed me to make some nice small brass work. With that one, you wound up the flywheel and stopped pedaling for the cut, and once it slowed too much, you backed off and started pedaling again.

        It certainly wasn't a fast machine, and I would hate to try to do anything resembling production with one, but in the small unpowered blacksmith shop I used it in, it greatly expanded out ability to do some of the work we needed to do. We mostly used it for brass and bronze bushings, and the axles and shafts that rode in them. Ours didn't have any kind of screw cutting ability, and I don't know if I've ever seen one that did.

        I suspect that one is missing some parts (like the flywheel) but it could probably be restored without too much difficulty. Make sure it's bolted down to something solid before use! Depending on the swing, I may have a spare headstock and tailstock around here someplace.

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        • #5
          Possibly a Barnes #4-1/2 like: http://www.vintagemachinery.org/phot...l.aspx?id=4641
          This is an older #3, but a better view of the overall machine: http://www.renaissancewoodworker.com...es-no-3-lathe/
          Machine in the OP's image is missing or doesn't show the seat support.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by BCRider View Post
            If only the drive wheel wasn't missing. I'll bet it had wonderfully shaped serpentine spokes.
            I checked with him. He has the drive wheel and some miscellaneous parts. I'll see if I can get a picture of that.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post
              Machine in the OP's image is missing or doesn't show the seat support.
              Is there supposed to be some seat support directly under the seat? If so, I'll check if he has it. As is, the seat "hangs" off the lathe as shown.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by JimH View Post
                Is there supposed to be some seat support directly under the seat? If so, I'll check if he has it. As is, the seat "hangs" off the lathe as shown.
                Oops, should have looked at your pics first. I see the seat support you are referring to.

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                • #9
                  I'm guessing that it'll look like the drive wheel in the picture linked by Reggie. And yeah, dem's the sort of spokes I figured.
                  Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                  • #10
                    From reading a little more, it looks like a lot of them did have screw cutting capabilities, I guess the one we had in the shop had just lost some parts over the years.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by TMo View Post
                      From reading a little more, it looks like a lot of them did have screw cutting capabilities, I guess the one we had in the shop had just lost some parts over the years.
                      The #3 and 4, no, the #4-1/2 and #5, yes via a leedscrew and change gears.

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                      • #12
                        You appear to have a Barnes in plausibly good condition. These were very popular over a hundred years ago when many workshops had no electricity. To turn a workpiece, one pedaled the lathe backwards from what you learned on a bicycle. This link will provide a lot of the history: http://www.lathes.co.uk/barnes/index.html
                        Roy Underhill of the TV show The Woodwright's Shop uses one of these on occasion. They will cut threads if the gears have not been lost. To be really valuable, it would have to have all important parts and accessories as it was supplied. If that were the case I can see someone paying even $1500 or more?? A year ago a local one in incomplete condition ie: no legs, pedal or wheel and no tooling it couldn't bring $125 on CL. A lot of these have been ruined by powering them with electric motors. They just were not made for that kind of service, I think, because those I've seen had very bad spindle play.

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