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OT: Recreating a PCB?

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  • elf
    replied
    This video shows how to add graphics to a PCB using Eagle.

    Leave a comment:


  • MrSleepy
    replied
    Have you tried Abacoms Sprint.

    Its looks like a simple pcb layout package ( no built in schematic designer ?) that has the ability to put a photo of a pcb on a plane and lay components over it ,as a feature.(Scanned copies).

    http://www.abacom-online.de/uk/html/sprint-layout.html

    Rob.

    Leave a comment:


  • browne92
    replied
    Have you looked into something like this?

    https://sourceforge.net/projects/ima...rberconverter/

    Leave a comment:


  • PStechPaul
    replied
    This sort of thing is probably more of a patent infringement than copyright, IF the device IS patented. Copyrights are tricky, in that they are automatically granted for any "intellectual property", although mostly written material, music, and works of art. A PCB could be deemed a work of art, but making a single copy for ones own personal use would probably not be in legal violation, and in any case would never be detected by the copyright owner and prosecuted, unless you announced it with sufficient details where it would be noticed.

    Reverse engineering would probably not be a violation if you changed the design sufficiently with your own efforts.

    Leave a comment:


  • wombat2go
    replied
    Sorry to have offended!
    I asked Les about copyright because of the following war story that I was involved with in mid 1990's.
    And I don't imply the following story applies here.

    In another country a smart industrial service technician ( I think freelance) not related to the company I worked for
    copied a double sided board on a photocopier, because he knew the original boards were costly.
    He quickly got it working.
    I saw the boards in some customer plants and even put 'scope on one.

    The analog/digital board encapsulated much of the know how that the company had developed, I suppose a $million +
    to develop the product.

    Then the artwork got into hands of a person who started making knock-off industrial products with a few employees,
    and selling them at about half price.
    One happy customer said to me "Why would I buy yours when I can get this one for half?"

    So the local division of company I worked for lost a lot of sales and nearly went belly up.
    Of course the employees suffered financially too during that time.

    That company regards circuit boards all the way back in time as its copyright.
    The board is customer property but the copyright is not.
    When the boards can not be produced any more, "mod kits" are provided as replacements.

    Yesterday I was talking to a company about embedded factory floor software.
    There are 2 problems - copying to make knock-offs ,
    and malicious damage because the software is feeding stuff to a machine control PLC
    One possibility is to remove all ethernet.
    What ever the fix will be it will add cost and take away useability from the customers.

    That is why I asked Les on the HSM thread he started about copying pcbs.

    Again I am sorry to have offended. It is very topical to me.

    Leave a comment:


  • SirLesPatterson
    replied
    Originally posted by wombat2go View Post
    Is it your copyright?
    I don't know but I feel I should have the right to repair my stuff and I wish I didn't have to explain myself. Is it very different from fabricating a replacement part for any commercial product? You take the broken part, trace, measure, whatever, and create a replacement. Sometimes you improve on it too. Anyway, my question was regarding functions of third party software.

    Leave a comment:


  • ikdor
    replied
    Originally posted by wombat2go View Post
    Yes, I do not, hence my query!
    And I am assuming nothing!
    Why do you ask, are you intending to sue him?

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  • wombat2go
    replied
    Originally posted by elf View Post
    It's more than 35 years old and (I'm assuming) he's making it for his own use. You don't even know if the board is in the public domain or not.
    Yes, I do not, hence my query!
    And I am assuming nothing!

    Leave a comment:


  • elf
    replied
    Originally posted by wombat2go View Post
    Is it your copyright?
    It's more than 35 years old and (I'm assuming) he's making it for his own use. You don't even know if the board is in the public domain or not.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tony Ennis
    replied
    I have used OshPark and liked them.

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  • wombat2go
    replied
    Is it your copyright?

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  • SirLesPatterson
    replied
    Originally posted by ikdor View Post
    Eagle can import bmp files into any layer. I think it was importbmp.ulp
    Okay, thanks. I was able to get it imported into Eagle as a bazillion little rectangles but that's just fine as a layer for me to use as a template to redraw from. It's far too complicated a board for me to want to redraw it without a visual guide. Thanks again!

    Leave a comment:


  • RB211
    replied
    Single sided? Be thankful for that! I've used Eagle in the past. Steep learning curve, no easy way out of this, other than having some one do it for you.

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  • PStechPaul
    replied
    In the past I have used Atlas Circuits to make prototype PCBs directly from artwork, which can be hand-drawn, PDF, or graphics format.

    https://www.manta.com/c/mmlv6z0/atlas-circuit

    I made a spreadsheet for calculating the cost according to his formula:

    http://enginuitysystems.com/files/At...Calculator.xls

    The boards can be single or double sided but are not plated through, and no silkscreen or solder mask.

    I have also used Electronic Interconnect AKA zoompcb.com). They have a good special for PCBs up to 5" x 5" and other special pricing, for professionally made boards with plated thru holes, silkscreen, solder mask, etc:

    https://www.eiconnect.com/

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    Yes, there are free PCB layout programs on the web and many of the PCB houses offer their versions of one of them. But all of these programs will assume you are starting from a schematic, not an existing board that you want to copy. I am not aware of any of them that have an overlay option.

    You might want to show a photo of your board on one side of your screen while working with the PCB program on the other.

    Actually, the best way to produce a good PCB layout is to first draw a schematic in the PCB program. The program will use that schematic to produce a list of the needed connections and will check to insure that all of them are present, with no cross wiring between. Better yet, many of the programs will be capable of doing the layout by themselves, using a feature called auto-router.

    I have made many PCBs and I find that these programs are the easiest, most accurate way of producing Gerber files for their manufacture. I have actually taken the trouble of doing the schematic a second time using the PCB program after I had already did it in a CAD program. And NO, you can't just import it from a CAD file. They depend on using the "components" as defined in the PCB software. These "component" files tie a schematic image with a physical package drawing. There are also ties between these two representations that link the actual connections; their functions on the schematic image to there physical location on the physical package drawing. All of them that I have used allow your creation of any new components that you need.

    Leave a comment:

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