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mill move - tiltback flatbed? really?

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  • #16
    Been there done that, also moved one very carefully with a 1500 pick up , 25 miles 1 way. Also move my Nardini lathe with the same pick up and use d pallet racking and a chain hoist to load and unload

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    • #17
      Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
      I just bought a Bridgeport and it will be loaded into the bed of a pickup. I intend to load it in pieces with an engine hoist--The table, head, ram, knee then the column. At least that's the plan.
      Originally posted by 754 View Post
      I can see maybe pulling the head and ram in one piece off, but not the rest unless maybe it's going in a basement via stairs.
      Agree. The weight isn't a problem for a decent engine hoist, you can pick up the whole thing intact; we're only talking 2,000-2,400 lb. Carrying it in the back of a pickup may be tippy with so much weight up high, but just separating the head from the column should be all you need to do there, providing it's all tied down well and the pickup is a reasonable size (i.e. not just a 1/2 ton Ford Ranger, etc).

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      • #18
        Been there done that, also moved one very carefully with a 1500 pick up , 25 miles 1 way. Also move my Nardini lathe with the same pick up and use d pallet racking and a chain hoist to load and unload
        https://35hotrod.smugmug.com/Machine...op/i-XbK9cMm/A

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        • #19
          You don't even need the roll back however its easier that is the easy way. I've moved machines with a simple tilt trailer from SunBelt, now I own one.
          Mike
          Central Ohio, USA

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          • #20
            I used a boom truck to move my BP clone mill from the mill store to my garage. Easy peasy!
            Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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            • #21
              Moved many with a drop gate single axle trailer Lift the mill slide a HD pallet under it, put a pallet jack under the pallet strap the mill to the pallet, roll to the trailer while leaving the trailer hooked up to the truck use the tongue jack with a block to raise the front & lower the rear of the trailer pull the pallet jack up the ramp with a cable hoist, chain fall whatever you have. Always run an extra strap at a high point on the mill to a low spot on the rear of the truck or trailer in case an idiot cuts you off & you have to hit the brakes. 1/2 hour tops to load & go & no cost at all.

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              • #22
                Thank you to all who responded! In the end I found a local truck rental place that can rent me a 16' flatbed with liftgate rated for 3500 pounds. I rented it for Sunday morning.

                metalmagpie

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                • #23
                  When I had my mill shipped to me, I had it shipped to my workplace (towing and repair shop). I picked it off the semi truck with a skidsteer with forks, drove the skidsteer right on to our rollback with the mill on it and hauled the whole works (skid steer and all) home, and unloaded it into my garage.

                  We've moved/loaded/unloaded, mills, lathes, injection molding presses, safes, etc.
                  Any careful wrecker operator can handle a Bridgeport.

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                  • #24
                    I had a rollback wrecker pickup and deliver
                    my 8,000 pound horizontal boring mill from
                    across the city for $180. Not a special deal,
                    and No I did not know the guy. I did help
                    it roll off the flatbead with my forklift to get
                    it into my shop, but from there I moved it
                    into position with 5/8" solid bar for rollers
                    and a good millwright bar. Easy when I look
                    back on it.

                    -Doozer
                    DZER

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                      I had a rollback wrecker pickup and deliver
                      my 8,000 pound horizontal boring mill from
                      across the city for $180. Not a special deal,
                      and No I did not know the guy. I did help
                      it roll off the flatbead with my forklift to get
                      it into my shop, but from there I moved it
                      into position with 5/8" solid bar for rollers
                      and a good millwright bar. Easy when I look
                      back on it.

                      -Doozer
                      Same thing here with our 6,000 lb bed mill. Only problem was loading it on the coldest day of the year. Zero F when I arrived at the site to load it!

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                      • #26
                        I've had two mills (a Bridgeport, and more recently a Wells Index) moved via rollback car hauler. Fortunately, the owner of the local company has a lot of experience moving machinery...his father owned a machine shop. Just be sure to lower the table and crank the head over as far as it will go in order to lower the center of gravity as much as possible. In my case, Joe knew exactly where to rig the chains and cables to keep the mill from tipping as he pulled it onto the truck, and again as he slid it off. He used four heavy straps to hold the mill down onto the bed, and he drove like he had good sense. No problems either time.

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                        • #27
                          Moved my Bridgeport and South Bend 14 with my 6-1/2' x 12' single axle trailer. Loaded both with a forklift but unloaded both by tilting unhooked from the tow vehicle and winched carefully off the bed onto the shop floor.

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                          • #28
                            Not much to add here but for future readers using your typical engine hoist is not the way to go. The darn hoist legs get in the way of everything.

                            I had a 2600# lathe on an engine hoist at there was almost no way to get that damn lathe off a 8' bed pickup. It had been put on with a industrial forklift.

                            Final choice was a 'here, hold my beer routine' or completely unbolt and remove the trucks rear axle assembly. I chose the hold my beer routine but never again. Took about 4 hours.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by flylo View Post
                              Lift the mill slide a HD pallet under it
                              flylo,
                              How do you get the pallet under the machine? No forklift or gantry remember. I have done it once, but it took careful planning, taking careful measurements of the machine, then custom-making a pallet, three people, two long crow bars, some solid bars rollers for final positioning on the pallet, etc. etc. Not quick and easy.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Yondering View Post
                                Agree. The weight isn't a problem for a decent engine hoist, you can pick up the whole thing intact; we're only talking 2,000-2,400 lb. Carrying it in the back of a pickup may be tippy with so much weight up high, but just separating the head from the column should be all you need to do there, providing it's all tied down well and the pickup is a reasonable size (i.e. not just a 1/2 ton Ford Ranger, etc).
                                My engine hoist won't handle the weight at full extension. And that's the only way I'll be able to get the parts into a Dodge Ram 4x4 bed. The B.I.L. will be coming along but with his new hip and new knee, he's not going to be much help moving large parts. On top of that, the access will be limited at the pickup location as well as the shop. It's going to have to sit for a while until I can finish a major project and make room in the shop. I may try to get a U-Haul trailer but it's load capacity is only 1960lbs. If I can get the trailer, I may just pull the head and ram but the table still presents some space problems here.

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