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mill move - tiltback flatbed? really?

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  • jdedmon91
    replied
    That's was good. When I purchased my Laugun I decided to pay to have my machine moved. The seller recommend a local crane/riggers service. They picked up the mill and moved it for a quite reasonable fee of $600.

    They used a forklift and rollback to move it, the moved it into my right shop with rollers. They were here 45 minutes


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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  • nc5a
    replied
    Magpie, good choice for a moving vehicle in your situation, well done. I generally stay away from lift gates having seen many that tend to flop around because of loose pins. The best, if you have the tow vehicle and you can find one for rent is a drop deck trailer. I moved my 5500 lb K&T with one safely and relatively easy. Second thought moving anything weighing 5500 lbs is never easy.

    I do like your machine moving fixture though.

    Ron

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  • metalmagpie
    replied
    Originally posted by projectnut View Post
    Machine tools of all sorts can be moved in a variety of ways. For me the simplest and least expensive has been a drop bed trailer like this:

    https://www.unitedrentals.com/en/equ...e-axle-special

    They are relatively inexpensive to rent at about $75.00 per day and available from national chains like United Rental and Sunbelt Rental. In our area they are also available from local companies like A to Z Rental and Area Rental.

    My most recent purchase was a Sheldon MW-56-P lathe. It weighs in at about 1650 lbs. When I picked it up the previous owner and his neighbor helped position it on dollies and roll it onto the trailer. After loading it we raised it enough to remove the dollies and tied it down to the deck and side rails. Then it was just a matter of raising the deck to travel height and driving away. When I got it home I was able to unload it myself by simply lowering the deck to the ground, placing 3/4" rods under the bases, and rolling it off the deck.

    The trailers come in several sizes and weight ratings. I used a 7,000 lb. capacity one that used a standard 2" ball. A larger 12,000 capacity units need a 2 5/16" ball. They also come in single and double axle configurations. The double axle ones can be loaded and unloaded without being attached to a tow vehicle.

    As a reference hiring a rigger would have cost between $2,200.00 and $3,300.00. Renting a flat bed truck with lift gate would have cost between $300.00 and $500.00 per day plus mileage and fuel. The trailer cost less than $200.00 for the 3 days I had it.
    That sounds perfectly sensible and I have a Sunbelt rental close to me with a drop-deck trailer on their lot and reasonably priced. They insist, however, that you prove your vehicle is rated to tow the max load that trailer is rated for. My little SUV just isn't up to that standard. If I'd had a big pickup with Class 3 hitch, though, I'd have done that in a heartbeat.

    I don't think we did too bad, though. We moved two mills from different places to two other different places, safely and without any scary moments, although it was hard work sometimes. I rented a truck with a 20' flatbed and a 3500 pound liftgate. The out-the-door total is well under $300 which I think is damn cheap. It's cheaper than a tilt-back wrecker ($4/mile? I don't think so!) and way cheaper than hiring a boom truck.

    Here's the truck I rented:



    Here's my buddy pushing his new Alliant on my dolly:



    And here we have both machines loaded on the truck at once:



    At any rate, I got some very useful information from you guys and am happy most of all that the whole thing went off without a hitch and nobody got hurt and the machines are fine.

    metalmagpie

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  • Tundra Twin Track
    replied
    When I brought my Varnamo home from Auction,I removed the table,all the motors and anything else that would come off easy approx 1500 lbs. was removed.The 20000 lb.forklift with 8' forks at the Auction set it right between the axles on my 14000 car hauler.When I got home had a heck of a time lifting it off the trailer with my 5500 lb forklift even bent one of the forks that were new two weeks earlier.After refurbishing it I moved to it's location in pieces,maybe the 7000 lbs was not accurate in the specs.I have lifted 6000 lbs. with that forklift.

    Leave a comment:


  • KiddZimaHater
    replied
    I moved my MILLRITE (which is about 3/4 of a Bridgeport), with a tiltback flatbed tow truck.
    The place I bought it from had a muddy open yard, which we had to wrestle the mill across on skates and plywood.
    Once we got it to within about 50 feet of the tow truck, the driver just wrapped the winch cable around the base, and dragged it up onto the flatbed.
    He strapped it, chained it in 4 directions, and kept the cable taut.
    When it arrived at my house, he tilted it back, slid it off with the winch, and help me roll it on pipes to it's new home.
    So, long story short.... YES a tiltback flatbed works just fine for moving machinery.

    Leave a comment:


  • wierdscience
    replied
    If you crank the knee all the way down and invert the head,the average bridgeport isn't nearly as top heavy as you think.A rollback wrecker will load and move one with ease.If you're really that worried about it,then add a couple timers to the bottom for out riggers.

    Leave a comment:


  • projectnut
    replied
    Machine tools of all sorts can be moved in a variety of ways. For me the simplest and least expensive has been a drop bed trailer like this:

    https://www.unitedrentals.com/en/equ...e-axle-special

    They are relatively inexpensive to rent at about $75.00 per day and available from national chains like United Rental and Sunbelt Rental. In our area they are also available from local companies like A to Z Rental and Area Rental.

    My most recent purchase was a Sheldon MW-56-P lathe. It weighs in at about 1650 lbs. When I picked it up the previous owner and his neighbor helped position it on dollies and roll it onto the trailer. After loading it we raised it enough to remove the dollies and tied it down to the deck and side rails. Then it was just a matter of raising the deck to travel height and driving away. When I got it home I was able to unload it myself by simply lowering the deck to the ground, placing 3/4" rods under the bases, and rolling it off the deck.

    The trailers come in several sizes and weight ratings. I used a 7,000 lb. capacity one that used a standard 2" ball. A larger 12,000 capacity units need a 2 5/16" ball. They also come in single and double axle configurations. The double axle ones can be loaded and unloaded without being attached to a tow vehicle.

    As a reference hiring a rigger would have cost between $2,200.00 and $3,300.00. Renting a flat bed truck with lift gate would have cost between $300.00 and $500.00 per day plus mileage and fuel. The trailer cost less than $200.00 for the 3 days I had it.

    Leave a comment:


  • flylo
    replied
    If I have to do something I haven't done before I just think how did they do it 100+ years ago. Like when they cleared woods into farmland the removed the stumps with a pole or log chained to the stump with a horse or mule on the other end so when the animal moved it tightened the chain & the mechanical advantage will twist the stump right out. Just sub a truck, 4 wheeler, lawn or tractor & an I beam & you have to buy or rent nothing.

    Leave a comment:


  • mikem
    replied
    My Bridgeport was moved by a towing company on a flat bed truck. He put a strap low on the machine and we put 1/2 inch black pipes under the base to roll it on/off. He charged me $150 to pick it up, drive five miles and put it in my garage.

    A friend that worked at a big bearing company came over and helped--we slid it down hill on pipes with plywood strips to keep from soaking into the grass and into my walk out basement. It took us about an hour! If the pipes slipped out, we had a Johnson bar that we levered under the base of the mill to lift it. Like the pyramids were made, I guess. Wheels, levers and inclined planes.

    Leave a comment:


  • TRX
    replied
    A friend used to own a wrecker company. He moved mills, lathes, compressors, and industrial refrigeration equipment regularly.

    If he had something to belay to, he could reach fifty feet around a corner with a snatch block and pull the machine to the door before sliding it up the bed.

    That was before the days of the rotator-boom trucks, which are freakin' amazing. They can pick a machine off a trailer, swing it around, and set it on a second-story roof, if that's where you want it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Forrest Addy
    replied
    Originally posted by metalmagpie View Post
    Next steps:

    tear whole wooden thing down

    load it all up

    move it to where you are PICKING UP the mill

    painfully put it all back together again

    load the mill

    tear wooden structure all down again

    load it on truck too

    drive to where the next machine is

    painfully reassemble wooden structure

    side trip to box store to replace wood with stripped-out lag holes

    side trip home to get saw and extension cord

    re-re-reassemble wood structure


    ... and on and on.

    I don't think so.

    I have to pick up one machine from a loading dock in downtown Seattle, then another from a driveway in Sammamish, then drop one machine in a driveway in Kirkland and then the other in a driveway in Woodinville. The wood sawhorse idea would work if you were say selling a mill and you just had to put it up onto the buyer's truck and forget about it, although you'd then either have a big wood ugly in your driveway or a pile of expensive scrap wood. But that idea doesn't travel well.

    metalmagpie
    Responding to assertions:

    Nah. I had a lifting horse I built in a hurry I used for 20 years. Stored the pieces in my rack when t wasn't being used. There were only eleven parts and eight bolts. It took maybe ten minutes to assemble and erect. I bet I moved a dozen machines with it.

    Did I say lag bolts? No, because they pull out I said continuous threaded rod as in through bolts with nuts and washers so they won't pull out.

    I built my wood lifting horse out of necessity in 1976 before roll-back tilt-bed trucks were available. You can probably rent one now for the price of lumber. My old lifting horse died after too many years in the rain thanks to the guy I loaned it to. He used it for a kiddy swing. By the time the rot was sawed off the legs, the beam was too low for loading tall stuff

    If I had to move smaller machine tools again, you bet I'd use a tilt-bed truck but I'm an old fart now. Moving heavy loads has a different meaning but it's just as much of a struggle.

    In the meantime, don't disparage without fully understanding what's involved. One can accomplish much quickly and safely with simple materials but you have to use the best technique. The key to the lifting horse's strength and safety is not the bolts; it's the bird's mouth cut the beam sits in. The beam is supported on the end grain step of the bird's mouth in the end of the leg. The bolts see only incidental loads.
    Last edited by Forrest Addy; 07-22-2017, 05:16 PM.

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  • Hopefuldave
    replied
    Originally posted by metalmagpie View Post
    Thank you to all who responded! In the end I found a local truck rental place that can rent me a 16' flatbed with liftgate rated for 3500 pounds. I rented it for Sunday morning.

    metalmagpie
    Word of warning, liftgates don't often stay level once they're off the ground, be sure to put a strop and come-along, a hefty ratchet strap or something similar from the mill to the front (or two tie-downs either side of the front) of the bed before raising it... Specially if you're raising the liftgate with the mill on rollers/pallet truck! DAMHIK!

    Dave H. (the other one)

    Leave a comment:


  • flylo
    replied
    I've moved many machines up to 10,000# & never paid anyone except for grunt help because of my back & never rented a pc of equipment. One thing I advise is to buy a real solid leg shop crane. I have 2 & like this towable Blue Bird the best. Tips down on wheels to tow. Paid $100, made for rental centers.
    https://www.zoro.com/vestil-hoist-tr...yABEgKJzPD_BwE

    Leave a comment:


  • rklopp
    replied
    In my first and only album on this site, I put photos of my Aciera F5 being winched forklift and all onto a roll-back truck. I did not approve of the lift height!

    I think successfully linked the photos into this post. If not, the album is public, and I think you should be able to view the photos by clicking through my user name.

    Leave a comment:


  • krutch
    replied
    Rental places may have a low trailer for backhoes or trench machines. I rented one once to move an eight foot Cincinnati lathe. The bed did tilt but it was close enough to the ground so as to not be in the stratosphere or working on a "mountain side".
    I have also moved several Vert. mills by dual axle trailer and had a tow truck lift them up to move the trailer out and sit the mill on timbers or rollers to move into the shop.
    Rentals also have dollies for heavy machine moving. I only use three when moving Vmills as uneven floors can send one scooting out and leave you with a tilting machine. I had one mill almost fall over from that. A bench and hi-low post kept it from going on over. Learned that lesson with one incident!

    Leave a comment:

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