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New Owner of a Bridgeport Mill - Now What?

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  • hornluv
    replied
    If you're going to pick it up yourself, I highly recommend renting a drop deck trailer. The whole deck lowers to the ground so you can roll it off with a pallet jack. Put a couple of 4x4's under the base parallel to the table to increase the footprint sideways. Space them so the pallet jack slips in. Then lag bolt into them through the holes in the base. The only problem with the drop deck is the trailer is pretty heavy, so with a mill on it you're going to be close to 5K pounds on your hitch. I'd rent a pickup from U-haul for the day. After all, the strongest truck in the world is a rented truck.

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  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    I posted the short strokes here:

    http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...-Short-Strokes

    Just be sure you pick the link that starts with "IMG".

    George gave a full procedure with screen shots in the Sticky post on posting photos.



    Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
    Wow! HSM photo hosting sucks!

    How do you get a real picture instead of a thumbnail image?

    How do you get anything?

    Leave a comment:


  • Machine
    replied
    I just bought my first Bridgeport a few months ago. I decided to tear mine pretty far down and clean it all up. I removed the head and rebuilt the variable drive system (thanks H&W) and replaced the motor bearings. Removed the table, saddle and knee and cleaned out 50 years of chips. Also thoroughly cleaned all lead screws and the 90deg gearbox. Then lubricated everything, replaced the way wipers and reassembled. Adjusted the lead screw nuts and got most of the backlash out. Removed the sliding ram and thoroughly cleaned it and it's rack and pinion drive gear. Also cleaned the tilt gear and greased very thing up and reassembled. Now it's so smooth and silky it'll run itself off the ram dovetails if I'm not careful turning the crank with one finger.

    The good thing about disassembly, cleaning everything and adjusting replacing anything that needs fixing is that you start off knowing your machine vey well. I know guys who have owned these machines for decades and now I actually know more about how they're put together than they do. It's a good start on learning how to use it.

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  • 754
    replied
    Just remember if flycutting say a head, tilt it about a half thou in 6 inches.
    Get an Indicol type holder for your DTI...... most used accessory for the mill.

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  • platypus2020
    replied
    New owner of a Bridgeport mill - now what?

    First wait for the condolance card from Sir John...

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Forest
    replied
    Originally posted by Forrest Addy View Post
    Man! What a tragedy!

    You bought a milling machine and now you have to clean it up, paint it, equip it. You'll spend nights and weekends out in the shop working on it or with it. Building mechanical models, car parts, more stuff for the milling machine. This is the first step of a terrible obsession called cast-ironitis an OCD behavior complex that lasts a lifetime. It's manifested by the patient's compulsion to acquire more and more machine tools, more equipment, shop space: it never ends. There is no cure once it gets established.

    The best thing is to summon some golfers or fishermen to do an intervention, then ...

    Oh! Wait! You have a lathe too? We're too late,guys. Ken is lost.
    Wait just a minute there Forrest. Golfers might be OK but fishing is way more expensive than machining as a hobby. Self caught fish is by far the most expensive food per pound on the planet.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dan_the_Chemist
    replied
    Best advice I got was to go buy a bunch of scraps and cut offs and then "waste metal". Make toe clamps and set up fixtures you might never need. Make some of Joe Py's angle blocks. Make some round stock into hex stock, make a pair of 123 blocks as accurate as you can get. Learn how to use the machine.

    Leave a comment:


  • OhioDesperado
    replied
    Well now what? Probably get it home. Figure out where it's going to sit and get it there. Then you need to level it.
    Don't think that you can really level it with a 4 foot carpenter level. That ain't gonna cut it. If you have a machinists level great. If not a small piece of glass and a ball bearing is close. Clean the glass and lay it flat on the table. Set a ball bearing on it and see which way it rolls. Level the machine until the ball bearing doesn't move.

    Then tram in the head. Watch a video or two on the way to do it and get that done.

    After that, you can begin figuring out a vice, tooling and such.

    Leave a comment:


  • Forrest Addy
    replied
    Man! What a tragedy!

    You bought a milling machine and now you have to clean it up, paint it, equip it. You'll spend nights and weekends out in the shop working on it or with it. Building mechanical models, car parts, more stuff for the milling machine. This is the first step of a terrible obsession called cast-ironitis an OCD behavior complex that lasts a lifetime. It's manifested by the patient's compulsion to acquire more and more machine tools, more equipment, shop space: it never ends. There is no cure once it gets established.

    The best thing is to summon some golfers or fishermen to do an intervention, then ...

    Oh! Wait! You have a lathe too? We're too late,guys. Ken is lost.
    Last edited by Forrest Addy; 07-22-2017, 11:20 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • CCWKen
    replied
    Originally posted by 754 View Post
    Now find 2 K for some tooling. Vise, clamping kit, collet set, drill chuck, boring head....for starters.
    Yeah, I went through that with the lathe years ago. I already have quite a bit of tooling as I was "milling" on the lathe. And I picked up some tooling along the way from other auction lots. The Mill has a vise on the table and X-power feed. I'll get there but first on the list is a bath, new frocks and lipstick.

    Leave a comment:


  • mattthemuppet
    replied
    Very nice, that's a really good price for around here, you did great! I've seen mill drills on cl for $2000 and more plenty of times. If you need an extra pair of hands to move it, let me know.

    Leave a comment:


  • CCWKen
    replied
    Matt, the hammer slammed at $1875 but there's tax, title and license on top of that. Out the door price was $2201.72. I'm happy with that as it's about half of what they normally bring in this area for worse. I guess the new ZTR will have to wait until the end of summer deals. Not much grass around here to cut anyway.

    Leave a comment:


  • CCWKen
    replied
    Yeah, I saw the invalid photo too. While setting up an album it says if the photo is not used in an hour, the photo will be deleted. There goes preloading for a discussion. The photo hosting here is a real mess. Well anyway, maybe you guys will see it on another forum--Like Facebook or something.

    Leave a comment:


  • mattthemuppet
    replied
    Yay! Congrats Ken, so glad that you got it! I checked it before I went to work and it was up to $1200. Would you mind sharing how much you got it for (here or by pm)? The more data points the better

    Looking forward to pics of it in your shop and making chips!

    Leave a comment:


  • Danl
    replied
    Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
    Wow! HSM photo hosting sucks!

    How do you get a real picture instead of a thumbnail image?

    How do you get anything?
    Maybe you were able to see a tiny version of the photo? When I tried to open it in a new tab, it returned, "Invalid photo specified".


    hmmm.....

    Dan L

    Leave a comment:

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