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Multi-viscosity motor oil question.

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Yeah #3 on the early ones due to the oil cooler being in direct path so 3 was getting "cooled" with super heated air in the first place... the result was usually gobbling up #3 exhaust valve when the head popped off and got munched by the piston,,, and people talk about german engineering like its some kind of a godsend --- more like a wet fart afterthought,

    then they came out with the dogfoot oil cooler that had it's own discharge vent and they ran a 10% larger fan to make up for the lost air volume,

    those engines held 2.7 us quarts of oil !!! and no oil filter! it is actually amazing that they did so well, if you got 100,000 miles out of a typical beatle engine you were doing quite well...

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  • flylo
    replied
    I bet if you had a bad cylinder it was always #3. We used to build dune buggies by cutting 14" out of the pan. We built ones that would do wheelies but I don't remember how much we cut but they were a blast.

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Originally posted by flylo View Post
    It is if you knock all the sludge loose & it plugs up the oil pump pickup which I did on a '53 Dodge Dart that had run non detergent oil so I cleaned out the valve cover which was packed solid but couldn't get the pan off without pulling the engine so I put detergent oil, drove it home from auto shop,oil light came on, kept driving engine seized just as I got home.
    penzoil's old "formula" killed many an engine - very high in paraffin

    Got my start working on the old air cooled VW's and they and penzoil did not mix,
    so many time's would go to do a valve adjustment - drop the covers and all kinds of layers of flaky scaly crud would fall out onto the floor, rocker arms not even recognizable --- would then ask the owner what they were running and 9 times out of 10 penz was the reply, the occasional quaker state was the other answer to the question, it was not a whole lot better,

    Valvoline was superior that way - never a problem it's all we used...

    nothings tests engine oil like an air cooled engine in my mountainous state...

    I have had guys with tractors tell me penz is all they used and they never had a problem - that's fine - just don't run it in air cooled car engines going up mountain passes, your tractor is so underpowered and it's got water cooling is the answer to how you got by running an inferior engine oil...

    that's back in the day - penz has evolved some...

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  • JoeLee
    replied
    Keeping the air filter clean can help keep sludge build-up to a minimum. Not sure if anyone mention that.

    JL...........

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  • flylo
    replied
    It is if you knock all the sludge loose & it plugs up the oil pump pickup which I did on a '53 Dodge Dart that had run non detergent oil so I cleaned out the valve cover which was packed solid but couldn't get the pan off without pulling the engine so I put detergent oil, drove it home from auto shop,oil light came on, kept driving engine seized just as I got home.

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  • andywander
    replied
    It's not easy to kill an old tractor engine.

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  • JoeLee
    replied
    Originally posted by sasquatch View Post
    Many old vehicles in the 40's used kerosene to thin the oil in cold climates for starting. Actually this was recommended in the users maual that came with them when new.
    Yea, that was smart marketing in the day........... they wanted you to prematurely wear the motor out so you could buy parts and bring it to your local dealer to keep them in business.

    JL................
    Last edited by JoeLee; 07-27-2017, 05:53 PM.

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    if the pan is not easily accessible then put tractor on trailer, fill engine with gasoline and drive on washboard stop and goes country rds with plenty of potholes, drain then refill with oil and drive a ways still on trailer then go for a start

    second thought - better stick to kerosene because if the pan was not easily accessible it may soon be when it blows off,,,



    you could add some powerful cleaners like the rislone 5 minute flush and keep it in for quite awhile (while towing and not running engine) although I think it works it's magic best when heated...
    Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 07-27-2017, 05:07 PM.

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  • flylo
    replied
    In old prewar aircraft engines with no oil filter the thought was better to have the sludge stick to the case using non-detergent oil (straight mineral oil) was better than running all the things a filter would catch running it thought the cam, crank bearings & other moving parts.

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  • bob308
    replied
    I have used multi weight oils most of my life in every thing. I have heard a lot of myths some repeated here. I started using 10w30 in a 57 chevy 235 with out an oil filter. then in a old babbet bearing dipper chevy in a 1 ton truck. no problems what so ever built a lot of race engines used 20 w 50 in them.

    the only problems I have seen lately is with most of the new production engines using roller cams. the zinc additive is being removed. which causes a real problem with the break-in of a new flat tappet engine. I solved that problem. I found out dollar general oil is good for use in 88 and older engines. have been using it for years even in the dirt track car.

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  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    Doesn't it have an oil filter? Run it for a bit and then change the oil and the filter. Do that two or three or more times until the oil comes out clean. Everybody needs a bath once in a while. Clean that sucker out.

    Edit: looks like a lot of others have suggested the same.



    Originally posted by strokersix View Post
    I think 10w30 would work great. One caution however, is modern oils have detergents. If this engine has been run with non-detergent oil there will be sludge accumulations. Modern detergent oil can loosen the sludge and potentially damage the engine.
    Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 07-27-2017, 02:28 PM.

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Rislone makes two different types of MOA's one is a 5 minute flush and the other is a full duration run time BOTH are for cleaning gunk build up out of an engine and Both should be considered SERIOUS MEDICINE

    I do not use the fast flush - it's only recommended you idle the vehicle for five minutes then dump it, idle maybe easier on certain components but others don't know much of a difference - things like cam lobes that are up against the same high spring pressures and such,,,

    the other kind is a powerful detergent but also a lubricant that meets or exceeds AM demands,

    it is still fully capable of degunking an engine and plugging up it's oil filter in short order - same with running synthetics when the engine has been ran on conventional it's whole life and esp. if its high horsepower small displacement = extra heat in a small package... synthetics are superior cleansing lubricants,
    customer just lost their engine due to not heeding these warnings, cleaning is high risk and there's lots to be careful about - but not cleaning is a guaranteed slow death...

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Aircraft engines used a gasoline dilution system for the same thing that sasquatch describes. They ran gas into the oil to thin it. It would boil out in use, so it didn't cause trouble longer term.

    I have a P&W twin Wasp manual that describes the process.

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  • OKChipmaker
    replied
    I have a massey harris poney.Have ben using 20-50 with a can of STP (the blue can type)( STP has the zink in it to replace what was left out.)in it for over 20 years.No harm done yet.It was rebuilt prior to starting to use it tho.Remember the oil filter on these is a partal flow,only a smal part of the oil pumped goes through it,the big part goes to the bearings un filtered.Any sludge will go to the oil passages and bearings

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  • sasquatch
    replied
    Many old vehicles in the 40's used kerosene to thin the oil in cold climates for starting. Actually this was recommended in the users maual that came with them when new.

    Leave a comment:

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