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  • Ot vw diesel scandal, nobody did it

    I just finished reading a very detailed and interesting book about the VW diesel emission cheating scandal.It cost VW billions of dollars in fines and many executives "resigned" with bonus.HOWEVER ,NOBODY DID IT.Thouands of lines of code were written and installed in the engine management sotware, but no actual human being did it.It seems that eveyrone was on vacation or sick when this happened or it was someone elses idea. Edwin Dirnbeck

  • #2
    Hmmmmmmmm - so what your saying is computers have now become self aware and changed the code themselves in an effort to kinda "procreate" if you will,
    make the emissions pass with flying colors, sell more VW's and therefor the birth of new computers in the process --- interesting concept

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    • #3
      The only way that they could possibly sell the "it was an accident" scenario;

      Johann: I have an idea! If we are at a stop light we should lean out the mixture.

      Sammuel: How can we tell if we are at a stop light?

      Johann: If the rear tires are not spinning we can assume that we are at a stop light.

      Sammuel: Even at 6000 RPM?

      Johann: Sure! you know how kids like to race the engine at the stoplights.

      Sammuel; Ooooookay.

      And that's how it really happened. It was an accident!



      Dan (I think I need more coffee before I post)
      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

      Location: SF East Bay.

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      • #4
        Who wrote the book? Someone for VW, no doubt.

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        • #5
          VW is not going to sell diesels in the USA in the foreseeable future according to one of the auto websites I read last week. Probably just as well. I'll bet they concentrate on hybrid and electric.
          After 2020 Volvo is supposedly going all hybrid and electric.

          RWO

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          • #6

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            • #7
              Am I the only one who thinks that long jail sentences and fines large enough to pay for it would greatly reduce these things happening?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by garyhlucas View Post
                Am I the only one who thinks that long jail sentences and fines large enough to pay for it would greatly reduce these things happening?
                Apparently, yes.

                Present admin will probably order the fines etc waived as a reward for "being smart".
                CNC machines only go through the motions

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                • #9
                  A agree with Gary that the punishments need to be sufficient to deter such activities.

                  When a company blatantly disregards the laws, that business should be banned from doing business for the length of time that a person would spend in jail. Will it bankrupt the company? Probably, but bankrupting a criminal does not seem to bother the courts when they send a drunk driver to jail for 3 to 6 months.

                  Personally, I feel that if a corporation has the rights of a human, it should also have the responsibilities and suffer the penalties of a human. If a wife abuser is sentenced to a fine and rehab to change his attitude, then the parallel of that would be to replace all executives (without golden parachutes) who were in charge when a corporation is found guilty of breaking the law.


                  Dan
                  At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                  Location: SF East Bay.

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                  • #10
                    VW didn't write the code. Bosch did...
                    Location- Rugby, Warwickshire. UK

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Mark Rand View Post
                      VW didn't write the code. Bosch did...
                      With the parameters set by VW...
                      Joe

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                      • #12
                        The problem was that in the past the rules only stated they had to meet the emission test as described. Cyclebeating had become a bit of a sport in Europe and I suspect it was similar in the US. All the certification bodies were in on it even the government ones. All of the car makers were doing it and that's why no customer ever comes near the claimed sticker mileage. The thought was that if everyone was doing it there was no unfair advantage.
                        This is the background against which VW decided they could do the same for their NOx emissions.

                        So it was officially illegal, but all governments had given very mixed messages in the years before where nobody was told to stop the cyclebeating.

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                        • #13
                          From https://www.theguardian.com/money/20...x-class-action

                          Harcus Sinclair says its survey found that 53%, or 2,706 drivers, had reported reduced fuel efficiency following the “fix”. More than 40% suffered reduced power and acceleration, while 739 reported a sudden loss of power as the car went into “limp home” mode.
                          I'm not surprised that reduced fuel efficiency, power and acceleration would have resulted from the fix but a sudden loss of power shouldn't have happened. imagine being on a multilane freeway in heavy traffic and your speed suddenly drops to 20mph.
                          Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                          • #14
                            The managers cannot be to blame. That would imply they had instructed the programmers to make the engine perform in the way it did and the programmers had done that. I have never met a software programmer who follows a spec or requirement accurately or makes the software work anything like the designer intended. Therefore it was a total fluke or the software was written by the mechanical engineer.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by danlb View Post
                              A agree with Gary that the punishments need to be sufficient to deter such activities.

                              When a company blatantly disregards the laws, that business should be banned from doing business for the length of time that a person would spend in jail. Will it bankrupt the company? Probably, but bankrupting a criminal does not seem to bother the courts when they send a drunk driver to jail for 3 to 6 months.

                              Personally, I feel that if a corporation has the rights of a human, it should also have the responsibilities and suffer the penalties of a human. If a wife abuser is sentenced to a fine and rehab to change his attitude, then the parallel of that would be to replace all executives (without golden parachutes) who were in charge when a corporation is found guilty of breaking the law.


                              Dan
                              Considering that Volkswagon employs over 600,000 people worldwide, do you really think banning them from doing business is the smartest move?
                              Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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