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Using an end mill in a drill chuck??

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  • Using an end mill in a drill chuck??

    What would you say about someone who uses an end mill in a drill chuck on a Bridgeport milling machine? There was a rack of collets along with the necessary wrenches in the cabinet where he got the end mill.
    Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

  • #2
    Originally posted by winchman View Post
    What would you say about someone who uses an end mill in a drill chuck on a Bridgeport milling machine? There was a rack of collets along with the necessary wrenches in the cabinet where he got the end mill.
    I would say that it suggests that they're either excessively inattentive or deliberate morons. An endmill has a hardened shank that's not going to be gripped by a drill chuck designed to grip the softer shank of a drill (unless you're a real purist and are using a drill chuck designed for gripping carbide drill shanks using it's lightly diamond coated jaws) and under any real load the end mill is going to rotate in the jaws. In the end you usually get 1 of 2 things - a really crappy cut or a broken end mill - the third option is if someone really reefs on the chuck the end mill might stay in place but the chuck gets sprung.

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    • #3
      A drill chuck tends to loosen with sideways load - after all, they were intended to drill. Might be OK for a very short drill and mill (like small slot) but a collet is better. The drill chuck would likely go slack at an inopportune time and all kinds of bad things would happen...

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      • #4
        Also the end mill might tend to walk down into the workpiece due to its helix.
        12" x 35" Logan 2557V lathe
        Index "Super 55" mill
        18" Vectrax vertical bandsaw
        7" x 10" Vectrax mitering bandsaw
        24" State disc sander

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        • #5
          Might work for machining plastic or wax, otherwise a good way to destroy the cutter and the project.
          Southwest Utah

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          • #6
            I've done it before, so guilty as charged, but it was with a small diameter (1/8") four flute stepping over to plunge cut a slot in a pre-existing hole. And it was for my own project, so could eat any failure. I was aware of the consiquenses, but yeah, not a good thing to do as standard practice.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by winchman View Post
              What would you say about someone who uses an end mill in a drill chuck on a Bridgeport milling machine? There was a rack of collets along with the necessary wrenches in the cabinet where he got the end mill.
              What would I say?
              I'd say that he likely is not personally financially responsible for his actions. If he were he'd learn very quickly that doing so will cost him much more than he hopes to save in the time he might save if he was switching various size end mills and collets, if that is even an issue here.
              Broken tooling, ruined work, and lost time add up quickly to drive the lesson home.
              Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
              Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

              Location: British Columbia

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              • #8
                I used to do it once in a while, to save a toolchange.
                One day the vibration broke the chuck taper loose, and it dis some table damage during its walk about..
                Not worth it.

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                • #9
                  It seems that some have rushed to an unjustified or unproven judgement here without either knowing the circumstances or contacting the "offender" ("sinner") here.

                  Or was he a "troll"?

                  If it was "$hit-stirring" or "bait for suckers" by the "guilty victim" then it seems that he was quite successful by any measure as he "trapped" quite a few.

                  It is quite possible that the set-up was quite adequate in or for the circumstances - perhaps not - but perhaps we will never know unless we ask and get an adequate reply from "offender".

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ezduzit View Post
                    Also the end mill might tend to walk down into the workpiece due to its helix.
                    Not if he uses an end milling cutter with left handed spiral cutters - they do exist - just as left-handed drills exist too.

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                    • #11
                      tiffie, tiffie, tiffie !!

                      As I was reading this, I thought, I was the only old cynical bastard, thinking it might be a troll, but no, then you post shows up.

                      Thank You Sir,
                      jack

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                      • #12
                        Off the the top of my head the only time its acceptable is when you need to create a flat spot to drill.
                        Mike
                        Central Ohio, USA

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by platypus2020 View Post
                          tiffie, tiffie, tiffie !!

                          As I was reading this, I thought, I was the only old cynical bastard, thinking it might be a troll, but no, then you post shows up.

                          Thank You Sir,
                          Glad to help - its nice to met kindred spirits.


                          Originally posted by Ohio Mike View Post
                          Off the the top of my head the only time its acceptable is when you need to create a flat spot to drill.
                          Nope.

                          Its also very handy when machining the side/s of a thin sheet/plate as the left-handed cutter will force the sheet back down to the machine table (instead of tending to raise/lift it) and at the same time pushing the drill/cutter upward and back into the drill chuck.

                          For what its worth, a standard (in my case (German-made) "key-less") chuck works very well on the shanks of very hard carbide drills and cutters too.

                          For what its worth I hope that this thread does not degenerate into another quite unjustified "pile-on".
                          Last edited by oldtiffie; 07-30-2017, 10:40 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by HWooldridge View Post
                            A drill chuck tends to loosen with sideways load - after all, they were intended to drill. Might be OK for a very short drill and mill (like small slot) but a collet is better. The drill chuck would likely go slack at an inopportune time and all kinds of bad things would happen...
                            Roger that !!!! As I've mentioned before when someone asks how to remove a stuck taper from a chuck, just side mill with it, it'll come off. At your own risk.

                            JL....................

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                            • #15
                              You mean like this:



                              Or this:



                              My mill/drill came only with the drill chuck, and I didn't really know much about collets and end mill holders, so I just used the chuck to hold the end mills. I practiced on aluminum and copper, and I found that I really needed to clamp the round column tightly to the head and the base, or when side-milling it would catch and pull around and mess up the slot. When I milled the bearing bracket shown above, the forces often caused the chuck to loosen from the Jacobs taper, and I had to bang it back in place with a block of wood and hammer. Frustrating, unsafe, and just wrong, but I got the job done:



                              http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                              Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                              USA Maryland 21030

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