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Using an end mill in a drill chuck??

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  • #31
    JT, don't spoil a good story by harping on all the niggling details.

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    • #32
      Dan:

      I suppose the chuck could come off the JT, although I haven;t had it happen. Mostly I find that the thing WILL NOT come off no matter what I do, so I tend not to think about that. Anyhow, a threaded chuck can be cheap too, most portable drills seem to have threaded arbors, and they are not particularly high quality, unless you buy a better brand.

      Originally posted by cameron View Post
      JT, don't spoil a good story by harping on all the niggling details.
      Heck, I want to KNOW...... maybe it is something that can happen in better chucks and mills also.

      You seem to be implying it is maybe not exactly what happened....

      I BELIEVE he had it happen, and I am just really curious HOW. Thinking about it, the DP might have been the type where there is just one bearing, and the spline is the only locator at the top. THAT can let the end of a drill or whatever is in the chuck wave around way off center. And it can let a cutter bang pretty hard on the work.... DAMHIKT. I had one of those DPs, got it used for cheap decades ago. It got replaced when I figured out the deal with it.

      And if the chuck taper was loose, OK there you are. But even the JT has to drop down a fair distance before it can clear the arbor and tilt out. Maybe half the length of the taper before it can be tilted far enough to clear the work? Dunno,.
      Last edited by J Tiers; 07-31-2017, 03:17 PM.
      CNC machines only go through the motions.

      Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
      Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
      Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
      I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
      Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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      • #33
        I have 'Never' used a chuck for anything but light drilling using just the tips of my fingers on the drill press handles.....

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        • #34
          I have used an end mill in a drill chuck, but only to counterbore, no sideways forces involved.

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          • #35
            I think most here have used a drill chuck as an end mill holder and have had one of the tapers, top or bottom let go, easily done when milling on the side of a surface. Hey when it's all you got you learn fast it ain't enough. LOL

            I think in AK's case he was using a HF mini drill press as a milling machine, admit it most of us have been there too at one point. The usual scenario is that one of the tapers lets go, usually the mt in the quill. Next thing to happen is seeing the chuck and end mill departing the quill and then the knee-jerk reaction of raising the quill to cut that dog loose. Of course not really being a very good spinning top it goes wherever destiny takes it.
            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

            Location: British Columbia

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            • #36
              Originally posted by old mart View Post
              I have used an end mill in a drill chuck, but only to counterbore, no sideways forces involved.
              When I do that, I notice the EM wants to "run around" somewhat just as it touches the work, which seems like it is side forces. Have not had one come out, because I use a holder, and most all the EMs are 3/8 shank, even if the cutter is smaller.

              The chuck gets used for odd sized shanks I do nit have a holder for. Like 3/16" and the couple 5/16" shanks I have. Not used for counterbores here, in general. I have lots of piloted CBs, but it has been done.
              CNC machines only go through the motions.

              Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
              Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
              Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
              I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
              Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

              Comment


              • #37
                You can buy #2 morse end mill holder from http://www.shars.com/catalogsearch/r...=morse+taper+2
                Looks like a mill from HF

                Dave

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                • #38
                  Yes, but those Morse Taper endmill holders are threaded at the top and a drawbar holds them in. A drill press normally doesn't have a drawbar option.
                  Kansas City area

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                  • #39
                    I suppose it would be a good time to mention that "end mills" used to have a tanged taper arbor, Morse, or more likely B&S taper. If non-drawbar arbors routinely fall out when used with end mills, I would think that idea would have been a spectacular failure, and would not have lasted in the machine tool market.

                    Yet they were used. Possibly used in horizontal mills, but still used. Many older textbooks show one of them in their picture of an "end mill". Evidently they were no flash in the pan, but from what some are saying here, they would not have worked for more than a few seconds.

                    Originally posted by Toolguy View Post
                    Yes, but those Morse Taper endmill holders are threaded at the top and a drawbar holds them in. A drill press normally doesn't have a drawbar option.
                    Holding in a drill chuck does not equal using a drill press............ Mostly in a mill you (or at least I) use drawbar arbors for everything, so you don't need to remove the drawbar to clear the tang
                    CNC machines only go through the motions.

                    Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                    Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                    Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                    I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                    Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Worse yet I think I tried to catch mine when it happened..
                      Normal reaction to raise quil, if stuff goes wrong.

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                      • #41
                        When I used end mills in the drill chuck of my HF round column mill/drill, it was usually pocket milling, so the chuck was supported by the milling bit and bottom of the slot. When milling a slot, the chuck just dropped to the surface of the work and was held mostly vertical by the Jacobs adapter. Also, I used very low RPM (maybe 300) so there was not much angular momentum to perform the "spinning top" trick. I usually had the spindle locked when milling so I would not have been able to raise the quill. Most times it seemed that the mill and chuck just stopped turning while the quill continued to spin. The chuck adapter had a drawbar to hold it tight in the MT2 taper of the quill.
                        http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                        Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                        USA Maryland 21030

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by oldtiffie View Post
                          Not if he uses an end milling cutter with left handed spiral cutters - they do exist - just as left-handed drills exist too.
                          Even more variety with end mills:
                          Right hand rotating, left handed spiral. Aka downcutting endmill, good if you work on wood or laminates and dont want to rip the surface.
                          Left hand rotating, left hand spiral. Work like ordinar, just on reverse
                          Left hand rotating, right hand spiral. Again downcutting

                          And then there is endmills with lower part right handed spiral and upper part ledt handed so that you can cut laminate on compression and not tear either sides.
                          Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                          • #43
                            http://www.harveytool.com/prod/End-M...utter_187.aspx

                            That is the R&L handed spiral
                            Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                            • #44
                              The Bison online catalogue has milling cutter holders, morse taper with a tang, I'd give them a miss.
                              I have seen on eBay, R8 collets which "hold" 25mm cutters.

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by winchman View Post
                                What would you say about someone who uses an end mill in a drill chuck on a Bridgeport milling machine?
                                I'd say his lazy ass is gone. Drill chuck can not grip the mill shank tight enough and the jaws will wear when the mill spins in the chuck. Only way would be if the mill has three flats on it. Even then it is not safe if the chuck is not integral shaft type.
                                Krutch


                                Mentally confused and prone to wandering!

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