Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Centroid finally accepting Acorn orders.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Centroid finally accepting Acorn orders.

    Sorry gentlemen for the breach of etiquette! Although there was no intent of blatant advertising on my part, the post certainly would be interpreted that way by the advertisers & supporters of this forum. If you need to vaporize the post title George, please do.
    Last edited by DICKEYBIRD; 08-02-2017, 11:51 AM. Reason: Deleted original post
    Milton

    "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

    "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

  • #2
    Are you talking about this Acorn?

    https://www.consumeraffairs.com/age/...tairlifts.html

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by DICKEYBIRD View Post
      Sorry gentlemen for the breach of etiquette! Although there was no intent of blatant advertising on my part, the post certainly would be interpreted that way by the advertisers & supporters of this forum. If you need to vaporize the post title George, please do.
      Didn't bother me Milton. I fixed a typo in your title but didn't give the post much thought. You've been discussing this for a while, so go ahead and post about it.
      George

      Comment


      • #4
        Probably the worst job of advertising ever.

        Centroid "Acorn" Step and Direction CNC Controller kit: a 4 axis CNC control with built-in motion control cpu.
        A reliable, high performance, industrial quality CNC control at a do-it-yourself price.

        More here...
        http://www.centroidcnc.com/centroid_...ontroller.html

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Ohio Mike View Post
          Probably the worst job of advertising ever.

          Centroid "Acorn" Step and Direction CNC Controller kit: a 4 axis CNC control with built-in motion control cpu.
          A reliable, high performance, industrial quality CNC control at a do-it-yourself price.

          More here...
          http://www.centroidcnc.com/centroid_...ontroller.html
          Hah, made 'ya look Mike! Yup, Pre-ordered mine with the "Pro" software bright & early this morning. I'm a pushover for pretty .pdf ads.

          (Thanks George)
          Milton

          "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

          "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

          Comment


          • #6
            If the Acorn proves out it'll be a major game changer in the DIY CNC area. As I see it, no more searching for all the parts to put together a working system. Other than drives and motors which are pretty straight forward it's all in one package with a well tested and capable programming system running on Windows that most of us are already familiar with.

            All you nay-sayers can now start complaining about the unreliability of anything running on Win7 . But before you do that you should realize thousands of us have been running Windows based Centroid systems with no issues for years.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by DR View Post
              If the Acorn proves out it'll be a major game changer in the DIY CNC area. As I see it, no more searching for all the parts to put together a working system. Other than drives and motors which are pretty straight forward it's all in one package with a well tested and capable programming system running on Windows that most of us are already familiar with.

              All you nay-sayers can now start complaining about the unreliability of anything running on Win7 . But before you do that you should realize thousands of us have been running Windows based Centroid systems with no issues for years.
              I could care less if it's Windows, Linux, or MacOS. The motion is controlled onboard. What bothers me is that it's an all in one, no modularity, the software is closed source, with licensing scheme, and silly business with blocks and lines of gcode unless you pay 500$. LinuxCNC is free without limitations.

              Comment


              • #8
                For those of us not in the know, what exactly is this thread about? something about nuts in the middle of a triangle?
                .

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                  LinuxCNC is free without limitations.
                  Out of curiosity, does LinuxCNC play nice with these types of products? (ex. Acorn, Smoothstepper, etc.) I was under the impression that it still required a computer with a Parallel port.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Centroid is a cnc control manufacturer... Acorn is their shot at the hobby market.

                    http://www.centroidcnc.com/centroid_...ontroller.html

                    Again - you get more flexibility/expandability with linuxcnc (and less expensive...)

                    https://mesaus.com/index.php?route=p...&product_id=66

                    but whatever. If you are familiar with centroid - then this is a great deal I am sure.

                    sam

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
                      For those of us not in the know, what exactly is this thread about? something about nuts in the middle of a triangle?
                      Sorry for the confusion Mike. I got excited yesterday morning about the news that Centroid is finally accepting orders for the Acorn controller. I immediately ordered one and then posted about it; knowing that there were a few other CNC tinkerers here that would want to know about it. After re-reading it later I thought that I had probably violated the no ads rule here & removed the original verbiage.

                      I think it is a great deal for all of us non-Linux capable home shop CNC'ers that are tired of working around Mach3's foibles. Granted, very few actually have an Acorn installed & running yet but Centroid is a "real-deal" company that has put together a reasonably priced system that is designed for their proven software. It looks like a great fit for me at my limited level of computer capability. I wish I had the time, knowledge & patience to play around getting a Linux system running but I just plain don't. I am willing to pay Centroid to get what I need. It's a leap of faith on my part.
                      Milton

                      "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

                      "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Linuxcnc cannnot use this type of hardware. Linuxcnc architecture puts the motion controller in the computer. It uses a realtime operating system to make this possible. Acorn, Smoothstepper, etc moves the motion to the external hardware device. These are buffered devices. Linuxcnc requires a realtime connection with the external interface hardware.

                        Why does this matter?
                        when you move the motion externally to a buffered device - you are really stuck with what that device can do. Want threading? Rigid tapping? gear hobbing? You need to make sure that the motion controller you pick can do it. or hope it happens in the future. With linuxcnc - the motion controller is in the computer. So features are available to all devices. You can even rigid tap / gear hob with the printer port if you wanted to.

                        Linuxcnc really is an awesome way to control a machine. (IMHO) You have unprecedented access to the realtime motion/interface part of the system. It allows you flexibility to build almost anything.

                        sam

                        Originally posted by hojpoj View Post
                        Out of curiosity, does LinuxCNC play nice with these types of products? (ex. Acorn, Smoothstepper, etc.) I was under the impression that it still required a computer with a Parallel port.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                          I could care less if it's Windows, Linux, or MacOS. The motion is controlled onboard. What bothers me is that it's an all in one, no modularity, the software is closed source, with licensing scheme, and silly business with blocks and lines of gcode unless you pay 500$. LinuxCNC is free without limitations.
                          LinuxCNC is free....... Okay, how about telling us exactly what purchased hardware is involved in implementing it. Assume the drives and motors will be equivalent between Acorn and LinuxCNC.

                          In my case time is money, some open source software is a pain (but I don't know if LinuxCNC is). If I have to pay $265 for Acorn plus $500 for the full software version, fine with me. The $100 Pro level of software will be all the majority of users need. The $500 ultimate includes axis rotation and advanced probing cycles with mold making software.

                          On edit: Skunkworks posted while I was typing. Is it correct that LinuxCNC needs the $200 daughter board he linked to? If so, that narrows the cost gap between the two systems a bit.
                          Last edited by DR; 08-03-2017, 10:42 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Given that I have a G540 and a pile of stuff to make a CNC router, this option is looking appealing to me. Originally I was going to do it using Mach3, but having to keep around an antiquated PC (32-bit and a Parallel Port) made things less appealing. Following that I was going to use an Ethernet Smoothstepper Board and Mach 4, but the smaller Mach 4 user base kinda put me off as well. Dunno how useful the Acorn community will be, but if I don't go the absolute cheapest route then the Acorn doesn't end up much more expensive than a different control board and Mach 4.

                            I know that LinuxCNC is the bee's knees- so long as you're comfortable with the setup. THAT, however, is the stumbling block... I've only got but so much time to dicker around with learning things, and there's plenty of higher-priority items on my list than Linux (like design of the machine, and how to actually run the damn thing). Sometimes we spend time to save money, sometimes the time's more valuable than the cash... given I am a rote beginner, my time's going to be more valuable.

                            I've got a very old Sherline mill (Lightmachines branded CNC) that needs a retrofit, once I get around to that I'll probably give LinuxCNC a whirl.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by DR View Post
                              LinuxCNC is free....... Okay, how about telling us exactly what purchased hardware is involved in implementing it. Assume the drives and motors will be equivalent between Acorn and LinuxCNC.

                              In my case time is money, some open source software is a pain (but I don't know if LinuxCNC is). If I have to pay $265 for Acorn plus $500 for the full software version, fine with me. The $100 Pro level of software will be all the majority of users need. The $500 ultimate includes axis rotation and advanced probing cycles with mold making software.

                              On edit: Skunkworks posted while I was typing. Is it correct that LinuxCNC needs the $200 daughter board he linked to? If so, that narrows the cost gap between the two systems a bit.
                              I was spouting off about my own feelings, what I like to see. I also like to build my own drones and stuff. If some one in your shoes were to ask me about a drone, I'd tell them to just buy a DJI Mavic Pro. In your case, perhaps this Acorn product is ideal. For myself, I like modularity, so if something burns out, I just replace that one item, not an entire board. I also like open source software, because I am not restricted to how much I want to pay, or how many times I can install it.
                              It sounds very nice that this product is produced by a big player in the CNC world, and probably does some nice things that would take a bit of time to get LinuxCNC to do.
                              I would have a CNC lathe right now if I wasn't in the middle of a professional photography drone build.


                              Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X