Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Machining Glass on a Bridgeport

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Machining Glass on a Bridgeport

    In my on-line adventures I ran into this so I thought I would share.

    http://benkrasnow.blogspot.com/2011/...d-mirrors.html

    Looks to me like he is using a diamond burr from an inexpensive import set of burrs. I have a set that is similar to it but I never thought of doing glass with them.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  • #2
    Thats pretty slick. I can imagine not great for the ways if the slurry can get to them.
    Andy

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by vpt View Post
      Thats pretty slick. I can imagine not great for the ways if the slurry can get to them.
      He seems to have solved that by using a tray holder. The tray captures the slurry.

      I think the same guy has a hand-held CNC router and built a refrigerator using rubber bands as the coolant. Interesting anti-gas law demonstration.

      Comment


      • #4
        I worked in a firm making aircraft parts and they frequently used vacuum holding fixtures, usually a thick slab of aluminium with a shallow recess for the workpiece to fit in and not move sideways. An O ring in a groove near the periphery and lots of small holes or grooves connected to a vacuum pump with a gauge. The gauge had a built in electrical pressure sensor to move the tool out of the cut and stop the cnc mill if the vacuum was failing.
        The vacuum jigs were custom made and could accommodate holes and recesses in the workpiece if necessary.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
          He seems to have solved that by using a tray holder. The tray captures the slurry.

          I think the same guy has a hand-held CNC router and built a refrigerator using rubber bands as the coolant. Interesting anti-gas law demonstration.
          He has built a lot of neat things.. He is Applied Science on Youtube. Check out some of his other videos, its a great way to spend a few hours.

          Comment


          • #6
            Yes, after I posted this, I saw his video on a home built, scanning electron microscope.

            He IS quite clever.
            Paul A.

            Make it fit.
            You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

            Comment


            • #7
              This past week I used a similar bit to make two 1.5 inch round glasses for a fuel tank. Faced off a scrap piece in the lathe and used double stick tape to hold the blank along with a blunt end in the tail stock live center. A piece of inter tube rubber was put between the blunt end and the glass. Used the tool post grinder set to grind a 3 degree bevel on the edge of the glass. This aloud for a little extra JB Weld. Put the lathe in back gear and slowest belt speed. Advanced the cross slide by .001" and aloud the glass to make several rev's before advancing again. It went amazingly fast.
              Gary Davison

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by old mart View Post
                I worked in a firm making aircraft parts and they frequently used vacuum holding fixtures, usually a thick slab of aluminium with a shallow recess for the workpiece to fit in and not move sideways. An O ring in a groove near the periphery and lots of small holes or grooves connected to a vacuum pump with a gauge. The gauge had a built in electrical pressure sensor to move the tool out of the cut and stop the cnc mill if the vacuum was failing.
                The vacuum jigs were custom made and could accommodate holes and recesses in the workpiece if necessary.
                I built one of those last week. I was tired of using doubled-sided tape for holding acrylic. Tape worked ok for the first 5 (I had to be very careful and take light cuts), but I saw 20-40 more on the near horizon. I needed to cut out 180mm discs and add features. Worked amazingly well - about 600lb of holding force with just 29 in-Hg vacuum.

                Comment

                Working...
                X