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gloat sort of: new die filer

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  • gloat sort of: new die filer

    There I was minding my own business when................................

    Actually one of our club past members died recently and his son is looking to sell all his tooling and equipment so being an obliging sort I bought this.









    $300 CDN, about $250 US right now, not a great deal but it came with 26 files, all but 2 unused, of various shapes and sizes and worth much more then the price of the filer it self. I'm happy with it. Works, no wiggly bits, paint is still in good condition. The guy that had it put it in the corner after he bought it. The previous, previous owner was a great machinist with his own sizable business and a real stickler for quality and keeping things in first rate condition so I'm confident it is a good machine.

    Rice re-branded there die filers in 1956 to "Milwaukee" so it's newer then that but I don't know by how much. The label doesn't have a model number but the castings are marked F2 but I can't find any info on that. There are FS2/FS4 and VS2 model this may be an earlier version of a FS2 model. The 2 means 2 speed and 4 is 4 speed. By speed they mean remove the cast guard and unbolt the motor and switch the belt, replace, so it isn't something that will be done much. It has the over arm file support and hold down bar but not the saw adapter over arm. I have saws so that doesn't bother me much.

    I don't have a manual so if anyone knows were one can be found I would like to hear from them. I drained the oil out but have no idea what to replace it with, I was thinking about ISO 68 hydraulic oil???????? but have no idea about it.

    One thing I have found in my web searching is that contrary to what I though not all "die filer" files are made to cut when pulled down. There are some that cut on the up stroke hence the bar that holds the work down. So making ones own isn't that hard.

    P.S. the stand was made in the first owners fab/machine shop, basic but very heavy and stable.
    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

  • #2
    Looks very close to my Butterfly Die filer, check the bottom oil seal don't use my much but on ocassion it's priceless

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    • #3
      I have the same model. Send me your e-mail address, and I'll forward the paperwork to you.

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      • #4
        I too, have a .pdf manual and also a product brochure, should they be helpful to anyone.

        To answer your question, the manual says SAE 10w.
        Last edited by Joel; 08-05-2017, 10:56 PM.

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        • #5
          I've said it before but worth remembering chainsaw files, they fit, thier cheap and parallel, very useful.
          Nice catch for not much money, I have one, once you get into the habit of using it they are great.
          Mark

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          • #6
            Thanks guys.

            The way this machine clamps the files it could hold just about type and shape of tang.
            The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

            Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

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            • #7
              You got $300 in files alone. Die files are expensive and getting very hard to find.

              I have a little die filer. Very handy gadget. I even sharpen handsaws on it

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Forrest Addy View Post
                You got $300 in files alone. Die files are expensive and getting very hard to find.

                I have a little die filer. Very handy gadget. I even sharpen handsaws on it
                Did not think of that, 10/10, thanks
                Mark

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                • #9
                  I have way more than you do dollar wise in my Keller. You scored, especially for Kanuckistan.

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                  • #10
                    A die filer with dull files is a boat anchor that you will wish you did not have. It will take a long time to do nothing much.

                    A dies filer with SHARP files is a tool that you can use, which will do more than you expected, faster than you expected.
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

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                    • #11
                      I would like to thank the guys that sent me copies of the operating manual. There a big help.

                      One item that I read was, while it wasn't recommended, it is acceptable to use regular parallel files in Milwaukee die filers even thought they would cut on the up stroke, you just have to grind the tang down to fit. Many purpose made die filer files are made to cut on the up stroke. Go figure. The machine is reassembled and up and running.
                      The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                      Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Downcut is stable against the table.

                        Upcut is not, you need to have a good overarm "foot" to hold down the part, or it's going to be no fun at all to use the machine. probably get fingers pinched severely at some point.

                        Cut off the tang, and grind the end of the file to fit the holder.

                        If your filer has an overarm to support or hold the top of the file (the OP's does), you can leave the tang on, but I would advise grinding it smooth.
                        1601

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Absolutely right about the hold down foot but it can and is done. I also found that even when cutting on the down stroke the work piece can grab and jump up when the file moves up which can pinch the fingers on the next down stroke.
                          The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                          Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by loose nut View Post
                            I also found that even when cutting on the down stroke the work piece can grab and jump up when the file moves up which can pinch the fingers on the next down stroke.
                            That's the point of arm and holder (I always thought). Can't image why you'd intentionally cut on the upstroke. There is a place in Mississauga that sells the files, 10 piece sets for $300 or so....so yeah, they're expensive. Mine is the boat anchor until I splurge....but I keep hoping to discover a cache for small dollars on day
                            .

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                            • #15
                              Some of the files I have are made to cut on the up stroke????????????????
                              The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                              Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                              Comment

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