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  • Mazda's Skyactiv-X engine

    Available for the 2019 Mazda 3, the Skyactiv-X will use spark-controlled compression ignition. Supercharged for a great increase in torque, it also will give 20-30% higher fuel economy.

    This video explains what is known, and conjectures details as yet unrevealed. http://www.roadandtrack.com/new-cars...ng-gas-engine/

    Since we are in the conjecture phase, what do you think of this?
    Allan Ostling

    Phoenix, Arizona

  • #2
    It is real. It is a Joint Venture between Mazda and Toyota. So Toyota will be using the tech also.

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    • #3
      May be a great engine technology, but that link crashed my browser good and proper !
      Richard - SW London, UK, EU.

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      • #4
        I've been following the hcci quest for a while now, and I'm excited to see an example in the wild so to speak. I have no desire to beta test the engine, but I'll be following it's rollout and teething problems closely.

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        • #5
          Diesel engine with a spark plug and VVT thrown in?
          I just need one more tool,just one!

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          • #6
            Don't forget; It was Mazda that tried and failed when using the Wankel engine design. Their engineers couldn't solve the problems with that system. You really think they're ready for a redesigned diesel? If they could ever get it out of their heads that fossil fuels still have a future, development on advanced propulsion will finally get under way.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
              Don't forget; It was Mazda that tried and failed when using the Wankel engine design. Their engineers couldn't solve the problems with that system. You really think they're ready for a redesigned diesel? If they could ever get it out of their heads that fossil fuels still have a future, development on advanced propulsion will finally get under way.
              According to this article, the Skyactiv X may prolong the future of the internal combustion engine: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/17/a...gine.html?_r=0.

              A salient point is the speed of "refueling." The article quotes an MIT professor, who says
              "Holding a gas nozzle, you can transfer 10 megawatts of energy in five minutes," he said, explaining today's refueling reality. To recharge a Tesla electric at that rate today, he said, would require "a cable you couldn't hold."

              I did a sanity check on this. Filling a 20-gallon gas tank in five minutes is a fuel flow of 4 gallons/minute. Multiplying this by the heating value of gasoline (114,000 Btu/gallon) gives 456,000 Btu/min, which is an energy flow of 8.02 megawatts. So the prof is right -- the convenience of fast refueling greatly favors petrol.
              Allan Ostling

              Phoenix, Arizona

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              • #8
                Failed? Ever driven an RX7/8 etc?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by aostling View Post
                  which is an energy flow of 8.02 megawatts. So the prof is right -- the convenience of fast refueling greatly favors petrol.
                  a battery of 99% efficiency would still have 80 kilowatts of heat dumped into it while its being recharged at such a rate.

                  1000 amps at 8KV, yes, you can hold such a cable, though you might need to buy a bigger pair of balls along with the vehicle for stress free refilling...

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                  • #10
                    I have no doubt that the system works- seems to me that various manufacturers produce engines that from time to time will have quite efficient combustion and simply just work well. Not all engines in their various fleets will operate as efficiently. A gain one year is not necessarily passed into the next years models-

                    At any rate, this reminds me of Smokey Yunick, who did a lot of experimentation on engine design, intake and exhaust plumbing, fuel stratification and mixture smoothness, etc. Because he was well connected in the industry he was given scope to do these experiments. I'd like to say he was a pioneer in the field, but the quest for more power and better economy has been alive for longer that he's been around. I don't know if he's still around- he wrote for some of the popular magazines on vehicle troubleshooting, etc. I seem to recall 'Ask Smokey' as the name of one column, Popular Science it probably was.

                    The ideas are all old- pretty much everybody knows about fuel/air mixing and how important it is to have a well-prepared mixture in the cylinder, and then an efficient means of igniting it and having it all burn and at the right speed. Various schemes are employed, but usually not all at once. Whether this is something the car makers have had up their sleeves for a long time already or not, it does represent two things- one is that they can and are able to create these 'incredible' engines, and the other is that it leaves nothing left for them to improve on for future engines. Once you have induction, valve timing, ignition, combustion, and exhaust all optimized, how could you ever provide next years 'improved' engines-

                    It may be that this development by Mazda will basically become the last engine system design, as fuel engines phase out in the next decade or so. At least we'll have a pretty efficient fuel engine to carry us through.
                    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
                      Don't forget; It was Mazda that tried and failed when using the Wankel engine design. Their engineers couldn't solve the problems with that system. You really think they're ready for a redesigned diesel? If they could ever get it out of their heads that fossil fuels still have a future, development on advanced propulsion will finally get under way.
                      Yep!

                      Failed Rotary.

                      The '79 RX-7 that I drove into town (with a 11A ) was a figment of our collective imagination..

                      EPA might say "failed", but I say "What a kick in the butt! ;-)

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                      • #12
                        HCCI might explain why no one in the industry is in the least bit interested in all the pretty pictures, animations and utter BS being pumped out by Manolis at Pattakon
                        If you benefit from the Dunning-Kruger Effect you may not even know it ;-)

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                        • #13
                          I think the report on the death of the combustion engine is greatly exaggerated. Especially for countries like the US where people drive longer distances on average. The range and speed of refueling are somewhat problematic but people still think with their wallet.
                          Total cost of ownership is not something people take into account, most people just look at how nice a car looks and how functional it is. The extra investment for the battery takes a long time to recover and human behaviour has not proven very clever in long term financial planning.
                          The alternative to the electric vehicle revolution is synthetic fuels, and unless govermnent starts to have an active policy everyone will be driving on crops, gas and coal based fuel once oil gets too expensive. The complete infrastructure for liquid fuels is already in place, making it harder for other solutions to take over.
                          As a second vehicle an electric one with a limited range is nice, but outside of the US few households have two vehicles.

                          We'll see how it goes with the HCCI, if you operate a gasoline engine like a diesel you will get NOx and particulate issues. The US will probably try to regulate them into the ground to protect their own industry.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by darryl View Post
                            At any rate, this reminds me of Smokey Yunick, who did a lot of experimentation on engine design, intake and exhaust plumbing, fuel stratification and mixture smoothness, etc. [snip]I don't know if he's still around- he wrote for some of the popular magazines on vehicle troubleshooting, etc. I seem to recall 'Ask Smokey' as the name of one column, Popular Science it probably was.
                            -Yep. Smokey wrote several books, including a three or four-volume autobiography, and had colums in Popular Science and Circle Track, among others.

                            Smokey has, unfortunately passed on in 2001 at 78.

                            It may be that this development by Mazda will basically become the last engine system design, as fuel engines phase out in the next decade or so.
                            -Highly unlikely, for any number of reasons, not the least of which are the aforementioned refueling speed, the capacity of a "tankful" versus a "charge", cost and complexity of batteries, the simple fact that electrics make poor cold-weather cars, the relative lack of charging stations- and the concurrent unworkable rate at which charging stations would have to be built in order to "phase out" liquid-fuel engines "within a decade"- the fact we barely have enough electrical generating capacity now, let alone enough to replace 200 million gasoline engines, etc. etc. etc.

                            Barring a significant and as-yet unforseen paradigm change, the liquid-fueled vehicle will be around for many, many decades to come.

                            Doc.
                            Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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                            • #15
                              As soon as someone mentions fossil fuel alternative, why is it that the discussion always turns to batteries? That's the problem with the engineer minds today--No imagination, only duplication. Batteries to propel cars is not a new idea. It's been around since the early 1900s. I can just imagine all the tractor-trailer drivers rolling their eyes when they think they'll have to go to batteries. Get off the battery kick and think of something NEW! We sent guys to the moon and back almost 50 years ago for crying out loud. That made the following 70s the best decade of invention for centuries.

                              Batteries not included. Think of something else.

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