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3D Printing: Step by Step?

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  • #16
    GOOD Slicer software is critical for success with complicated prints. I recommend Simplify3D. Does the Cetus have a heated bed? It's crucial for using ABS. I use a Prusa i3 Mk2s

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
      OK, I have decided that I will get a 3D printer. Haven't picked one yet. What I would like to ask is just what do I need and need to do in order to get started.

      I have a first project in mind, a stand or holder for my TV remote. It will both keep the broken battery cover on and allow me to stand the remote in a vertical position on my desk. Here is a quick concept drawing.



      What I want is to know where I go from this 2D CAD drawing. What do I need? And how do I do it? I would guess that a 3D CAD drawing would be the first step, but will any 3D CAD program do or do I need any specific ones. Cost is a prime consideration so no $10K programs, PLEASE. Free would be best.

      And then what are the steps from there? Do I need any kind of program that translates the 3D drawing into something the printer will understand? Should I buy the printer first and work backwards?
      Your drawing is problematic, there is at least some missing hidden geometry for the internal hard angles which makes the drawing difficult to interpret, if the 3D example model offered is correct your drawing is even worse than I suspect ;-)
      You might be better with a "back of a cigarette packet" 3D sketch with dimensions,

      - Nick
      If you benefit from the Dunning-Kruger Effect you may not even know it ;-)

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      • #18
        I am playing around with Tinkercad and Fusion360. I think I am going to like Fusion360.

        My sketch was not intended to be a polished drawing. The dimensions are about 2" wide, 1.25 deep, and 1" tall. I did leave off a line on the right hand view where the curved back meets the flat side, but I think that is obvious. Otherwise it is accurate: a "D" shaped brick, one inch tall with a "D" shaped, blind hole in the middle. Elf's suggested 3D model is not correct. He seems to have seen more lines than I drew. I will post a 3D version when I get one.
        Paul A.
        SE Texas

        And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
        You will find that it has discrete steps.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
          I am playing around with Tinkercad and Fusion360. I think I am going to like Fusion360.
          Fusion is a little tricky to learn, but its definitely the best free option ive tried. Not quite as easy as something like Sketchup, but a lot more powerful and more used friendly than the competition products

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          • #20
            I use autocad and then Cura to slice it and create the tool path. Best advice is just start playing. I read everything I could before buying and felt like there were holes in everything that I was reading. Once I started playing, it didn't take long before I was printing some very complex parts. I bought a prussa clone for right around $200 off eBay and have been very happy with it.


            Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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            • #21
              After a couple of initial sessions with Fusion, I had to concentrate on other things. I am hoping to get back to it soon. I guess I will find out how the free option works because I am sure the initial 30 days are long expired now.
              Paul A.
              SE Texas

              And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
              You will find that it has discrete steps.

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