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Leave some rust when cleaning parts that are going to rust again?

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  • Leave some rust when cleaning parts that are going to rust again?

    I was cleaning some drum brake parts and rust bluing came to mind. It made me wonder if too much cleaning is worse than leaving a patina on parts that are definitely going to rust again? Usually I remove scale, wire brush, then soak things in evapo-rust which works great for fasteners and small parts. But it seems like a wasted effort on some things like this parking brake lever that pins to the brake shoe.

  • #2
    You could paint the parts with exhaust pipe high temperature paint.

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    • #3
      So not soak springs in Evaporust.
      You will be sorry.

      -Doozer
      DZER

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Doozer View Post
        So not soak springs in Evaporust.
        You will be sorry.
        There are pretty much no springs left from the rust anyhow... got a new spring kit.

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        • #5
          I don't see that a film will slow down any future rust. After all the goal with bluing on firearms is to create a surface which holds oil more readily to stop any rust from forming. But if you're going to leave the surfaces dry I don't see any bluing or residual rust being any sort of barrier to slow down future rust.

          Mostly I see just cleaning it down to the thin layer of red as being less work than going all the way to bare metal with the Evaporust. If it's going to rust anyway then simply save yourself some added work.

          If it's a NICE car and you're going to keep it for many years then I think I'd just go with painting all the surfaces that are not actually friction related. But those smaller parts and even the drums themselves don't get so hot that we need header paint. Common engine block enamel is easily heat resistant enough to work on brake parts on anything other than seriously driven sports cars, race cars or long haul trucks that really work their brakes on longer downhill sections. On that sort of vehicle I'd still use engine enamel on the smaller parts but I'd leave the actual drums bare or use VHT paint.... and not much of that either as the paint becomes an insulator and will slow down the cooling of the drums.
          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Doozer View Post
            So not soak springs in Evaporust.
            You will be sorry.
            Acid based rust removers can cause hydrogen embrittlement in hardened steel and springs, but I was under the impression thaf chelate treatments like Evaporus to were safe for Springs. I've not had trouble with Springs in Evaporost. Anyone have a different experience?

            Ed
            For just a little more, you can do it yourself!

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            • #7
              I cleaned a pair of spring divider calipers
              in Evaporust once, when I touched it, the
              spring just fell apart. Good bye to a good
              old pair of divider calipers.

              -Doozer
              DZER

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              • #8
                The best technique is to (if you must) first take all pressure off the springs. Then soak only just long enough to remove most rust. Pull out the second they are "done".

                If you use sandpaper, use light oil with it. The oil coating seems to "get embedded" better than just wiping oil over afterward.
                1601

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan

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                • #9
                  I've never had any issue with springs and ER. Maybe all that was holding them together was the rust?

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                  • #10
                    Never done it with springs so guess I shouldn't post. But, for other things I have had a lot of luck with conversion coatings

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                    • #11
                      I really like the rust converter coatings as well, except for the time Dad put it on my welding table - it's not electrically conductive and is really hard to grind off. In my experience the resulting coating is tougher than any paint.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ed_h View Post
                        Acid based rust removers can cause hydrogen embrittlement in hardened steel and springs, but I was under the impression thaf chelate treatments like Evaporus to were safe for Springs. I've not had trouble with Springs in Evaporost. Anyone have a different experience?

                        Ed
                        It's NOT embrittlement that is the problem, usually. it is a form of stress corrosion, where the corrosion (or reaction, which may include the chelation) is enhanced in areas that are stressed. Once a slight depression is created in a stressed area, that has more stress than other areas, so it is worse there.

                        The stressed area is preferentially attacked until the stress is relieved.

                        Springs are bad for that , obviously, but I have seen it follow the patterns on case hardened items. Never used evaporust, but obviously it can be a problem, per the other post. Electrolysis, and phosphoric can do it, but usually only if left to soak for well over the usual time.
                        Last edited by J Tiers; 08-21-2017, 05:13 PM.
                        1601

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

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