Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Carbon Monoxide Detector / Alarms

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Carbon Monoxide Detector / Alarms

    I was thinking of getting a CO detector for home and shop. I like the ones with the LED displays so you can get a close idea of the percentages of CO vs the alarm just going off.
    There are so many makes and models of these out there that it's hard to choose. Does anyone have any experience with any of these???
    Which ones are the most accurate, what are the percentages of error in the reading etc.

    JL...............
    Last edited by JoeLee; 08-25-2017, 10:31 AM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
    I was thinking of getting a CO2 detector for home and shop. I like the ones with the LED displays so you can get a close idea of the percentages of CO2 vs the alarm just going off.
    There are so many makes and models of these out there that it's hard to choose. Does anyone have any experience with any of these???
    Which ones are the most accurate, what are the percentages of error in the reading etc.

    JL...............
    CO, not CO2

    Most if not all consumer models rely on electrochemical sensor that has limited lifetime.
    I would get a model that shows how fresh it is(mfg date) and "best before" date.

    I did some digging when I bought mine and Kidde was one of more reliable ones. Various less-known brands failed at local safety agency tests.
    Kidde also had mfg. date showing outside of the package and it has long-life (10years) sensor on most models.

    Comment


    • #3
      We got one, and as far as I can tell, it never worked at all. Worthless.

      The Kidde sounds good.
      Last edited by J Tiers; 08-25-2017, 11:03 AM.
      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by MattiJ View Post
        CO, not CO2

        Most if not all consumer models rely on electrochemical sensor that has limited lifetime.
        I would get a model that shows how fresh it is(mfg date) and "best before" date.

        I did some digging when I bought mine and Kidde was one of more reliable ones. Various less-known brands failed at local safety agency tests.
        Kidde also had mfg. date showing outside of the package and it has long-life (10years) sensor on most models.
        Thanks for the info......... Kidde was one that I was looking at,
        also Nighthawk.
        I corrected the error.....CO.

        JL.......................

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
          We got one, and as far as I can tell, it never worked at all. Worthless.

          The Kidde sounds good.
          Well maybe if you think it didn't work at all there was no CO present to be detected.

          JL................

          Comment


          • #6
            I've had Nighthawk and Kiddie for decades. No issues, and both have gone off at various times due to vehicles, fireplace, heaters etc.

            If you don't think they work start the car in the garage for a few seconds. Mine in the garage has a digital display. Amazing how much it reads and how long it takes to go away.

            Comment


            • #7
              I used a lot of Macurco (sp) for CO and for explosive gas applications. Had very few falses and saved a plant or two (explosive gas). Some are still in service a decade or more later. I don't know if they are still around, and I don't know if they made any standalone. All of the ones I installed were tied into a central alarm panel. Never really had any troubles. The biggest key was proper installation. Hot CO rises and cooled CO falls. Mounting height should always follow the guidelines of the installation instructions.
              *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                Well maybe if you think it didn't work at all there was no CO present to be detected.

                JL................
                Doubtful.
                It had a display for percent CO, and that never budged from zero, even if in a place that I KNEW had some (car exhaust, etc). I have been around CO enough to know what it "feels like" if there is much of it around. You can't "smell" it, but that does not mean you cannot "detect" it.
                1601

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                  Doubtful.
                  It had a display for percent CO, and that never budged from zero, even if in a place that I KNEW had some (car exhaust, etc). I have been around CO enough to know what it "feels like" if there is much of it around. You can't "smell" it, but that does not mean you cannot "detect" it.
                  Could be that you have dumbed-down american version:
                  "North America
                  The Canadian Mortgage and Housing Association reports, "The standards organizations of Canada (CSA) and the United States (Underwriters Laboratories or UL) have coordinated the writing of CO standards and product testing. The standards as of 2010 prohibit showing CO levels of less than 30 ppm on digital displays. The most recent standards also require the alarm to sound at higher levels of CO than with previous editions of the standard. The reasoning behind these changes is to reduce calls to fire stations, utilities and emergency response teams when the levels of CO are not life threatening. This change will also reduce the number of calls to these agencies due to detector inaccuracy or the presence of other gases. Consequently, new alarms will not sound at CO concentrations up to 70 ppm. Note that these concentrations are significantly in excess of the Canadian health guidelines,"[21] (and also in excess of US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Permissible exposure limits, which in 50 ppm.)[22]"

                  From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_monoxide_detector

                  The detectors are also typically (purposedly) pretty slow:
                  "In the UK a domestic/Type-B alarm compliant with BS EN 50291:2001 should emit an audible alarm after about 3 minutes exposure to 300 ppm CO, or 10 to 40 minutes at 100 ppm, or 60 to 90 minutes at 50 ppm"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MattiJ View Post
                    Could be that you have dumbed-down american version:
                    ......
                    The detectors are also typically (purposedly) pretty slow:
                    "In the UK a domestic/Type-B alarm compliant with BS EN 50291:2001 should emit an audible alarm after about 3 minutes exposure to 300 ppm CO, or 10 to 40 minutes at 100 ppm, or 60 to 90 minutes at 50 ppm"
                    While I agree that those americans are pretty dumb in some ways, this does not seem to be one of them.

                    The purpose of a detector is to alert a person to hazardous conditions. If the condition is not hazardous, either in amount, or in duration, there is little reason to "go ballistic" about it, like a typical "frightened Yuppie" would.

                    You are drinking water that has poisons in it.

                    Your choice is to either freak out and run around screaming, or to realize that the levels are very low, that virtually all water has been similar, for tens of thousands of years (just different poisons), and that you aren't gonna die from it (unlike folks in India and Pakistan).

                    Same with CO. Run around screaming, afraid to sleep because there is some detectable amount of CO, or realize that the thing will go off if it senses levels that ARE hazardous (assuming the thing actually works). You can do the running and screaming, the rest of us will deal with it.

                    Of course, the news outlets will always tell you to opt for the running and screaming, but they are congenitally disposed to freak out and tell you to do the same. They will tell you to abandon the house and run away if any CO at all is detected....so limiting the detection to actual hazardous levels is probably sensible. Frightened Yuppies ALWAYS do what the news outlets say.... they know they have to.
                    Last edited by J Tiers; 08-25-2017, 01:51 PM.
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                      Thanks for the info......... Kidde was one that I was looking at,
                      also Nighthawk.
                      I corrected the error.....CO.

                      JL.......................

                      Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
                      I've had Nighthawk and Kiddie for decades. No issues, and both have gone off at various times due to vehicles, fireplace, heaters etc.

                      If you don't think they work start the car in the garage for a few seconds. Mine in the garage has a digital display. Amazing how much it reads and how long it takes to go away.
                      I think that's the model that got recalled last year.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                        While I agree that those americans are pretty dumb in some ways, this does not seem to be one of them.



                        Your choice is to either freak out and run around screaming, or to realize that the levels are very low
                        Partly agree, I was just pointing out possible reason why your alarm never shoved any signs of CO. (And just like you said, Your choice. Or actually the choice is already made for you higher up.)
                        But the lcd display zero-blanking below 30ppm IMO sucks because it makes "preventive maintenance" more difficult.

                        Years ago I worked on a big steel factory where CO is common problem and can very easily see the problem between false alarms and actually reacting to dangerous levels. In some areas the personal detectors were bleeping at least once a day and if there was bigger leak some didn't even bother to check the readings.
                        Wont need big leak on a 4 feet pipeline carrying 5000000 m3 of blast furnace gas per day..

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                          While I agree that those americans are pretty dumb in some ways, this does not seem to be one of them.

                          The purpose of a detector is to alert a person to hazardous conditions. If the condition is not hazardous, either in amount, or in duration, there is little reason to "go ballistic" about it, like a typical "frightened Yuppie" would.

                          You are drinking water that has poisons in it.

                          Your choice is to either freak out and run around screaming, or to realize that the levels are very low, that virtually all water has been similar, for tens of thousands of years (just different poisons), and that you aren't gonna die from it (unlike folks in India and Pakistan).

                          Same with CO. Run around screaming, afraid to sleep because there is some detectable amount of CO, or realize that the thing will go off if it senses levels that ARE hazardous (assuming the thing actually works). You can do the running and screaming, the rest of us will deal with it.

                          Of course, the news outlets will always tell you to opt for the running and screaming, but they are congenitally disposed to freak out and tell you to do the same. They will tell you to abandon the house and run away if any CO at all is detected....so limiting the detection to actual hazardous levels is probably sensible. Frightened Yuppies ALWAYS do what the news outlets say.... they know they have to.
                          CO is cummultive.any amount causes several issues. A number display serves little good in my opinion.

                          Sent from my Nexus 10 using Tapatalk

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by tincture500 View Post
                            CO is cummultive.any amount causes several issues. A number display serves little good in my opinion.

                            Sent from my Nexus 10 using Tapatalk
                            There is a rate at which you get rid of it. Not as if it stays in you forever.

                            Half life is about 5 hours.
                            1601

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Looks like recommended indoor air limits are indeed pretty low. Alarm at 50ppm keep factory workers alive but for example ASHRAE maximum recommended level for indoor air is 9ppm.
                              Last edited by MattiJ; 08-25-2017, 06:09 PM.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X