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  • Epoxy destroyer ?

    I've got a die cast (zinc alloy ) assembly someone glued together with an unknown glue. The best guess I have is it looks like JB weld or epoxy putty or some other gap filling adhesive. I'm trying to get these parts apart for a customer. Being zinc I can't apply much force or heat. Tried a propane torch, didn't affect the glue. Tried acetone, lacquer thinner, no help. Stumped, but I know there are other more potent and more expensive solvents.

    Any suggestions are appreciated, the glue is all inside and very difficult to access in terms of surface area. So chemical soak unless a better suggestion comes up.


    Thanks.
    Gary


    Appearance is Everything...

  • #2
    Heat it more.
    The epoxy will give up the ghost before the zinc melts.
    I promise you.

    -D
    DZER

    Comment


    • #3
      Some glue removers are very caustic (Kleen Strip Comes to Mind), but I don't know what they would do to the die cast parts. I know it works on polyester glues (and resins), but have no clue if it works on epoxy. I usually use heat to soften epoxy on metal parts. I often epoxy parts to sacrificial backing for machining, and then use heat to soften the epoxy and remove the finished part.
      *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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      • #4
        If heat won't do it, try a product like Aircraft Stripper. Heat SHOULD do it though. I've had JB Weld fail under heat before. Hit it again

        Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

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        • #5
          Dunk it in closed container of Homer Formby's furniture refinisher. That stuff will cut ant cured organic film or catylized plastic given time. It turns powder coat to goo in a couple hours. 24 hours in Homers will turn JB into cheese you can crumble off. Well depends on thickness. It may take two or three shots to get it all.

          Beware of heat with die cast. 400 is fine. 500 is probably risky. Many alloys of zinc are "hot-shot:" weak and very brittle.
          Last edited by Forrest Addy; 08-28-2017, 05:07 AM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by goose View Post
            I've got a die cast (zinc alloy ) assembly someone glued together with an unknown glue. The best guess I have is it looks like JB weld or epoxy putty or some other gap filling adhesive. I'm trying to get these parts apart for a customer. Being zinc I can't apply much force or heat. Tried a propane torch, didn't affect the glue. Tried acetone, lacquer thinner, no help. Stumped, but I know there are other more potent and more expensive solvents.

            Any suggestions are appreciated, the glue is all inside and very difficult to access in terms of surface area. So chemical soak unless a better suggestion comes up.


            Thanks.
            Heat is the best , controlled of course _ zimac, pot metal has a low melting point of 419*°C (786*°F), jb weld appears to yeild at 300 degree F , appears you have a significant temperture spread. zinc is often alloyed with other metals including lead, tin, aluminium, and copper.
            There is no metallurgical standard for pot metal. Common metals in pot metal include*zinc,*lead,*copper,*tin,*magnesium,*alumin ium,*iron, and*cadmium. The primary advantage of pot metal is that it is quick and easy to cast. Because of its low melting temperature, it requires no sophisticated foundry equipment or specialized molds. Manufacturers sometimes use it to experiment with molds and ideas (e.g.,*prototypes) before casting final products in a higher quality alloy.

            Depending on the exact metals "thrown into the pot," pot metal can become unstable over time, as it has a tendency to bend, distort, crack, shatter, and pit with age. The low boiling point of zinc and fast cooling of newly cast parts often trap air bubbles within the cast part, weakening it. Many components common in pot metal are susceptible to corrosion from airborne acids and other contaminants, and internal corrosion of the metal often causes decorative plating to flake off.[citation needed]*Pot metal is not easily glued,*soldered, or*welded.

            In the late nineteenth century,*pot metal*referred specifically to a copper alloy that was primarily alloyed with lead. Mixtures of 67% copper with 29% lead and 4% antimony and another one of 80% copper with 20% lead were common formulations.[1]

            The primary component of pot metal is zinc, but often the caster adds other metals to the mix to strengthen the cast part, improve flow of the molten metal, or to reduce cost.[dubious*]*With a low melting point of 419*°C (786*°F), zinc is often alloyed with other metals including lead, tin, aluminium, and copper.

            As for weld

            *

            Heat limits of J-B weld expoxy?

            [http://www]*

            How much heat can*J-B Weld's Quick-Setting steel reinforced epoxy*take?

            I fixed this pot handle recently and it's been holding up well under average cooking temperatures.



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            Temperature resistance for adhesives

            According to the*website, up to 300 °F (150 °C).

            Keep in mind though that bond strength also depends to a large degree on the substrate and on the surface preparation. An adhesive cannot be suited for all substrates.

            Panhandles are often made out of melamine or other thermosetting resins which should bond pretty well with epoxy. Some thermoplastics (especially PE) won't bond at all without a primer.

            The standard mantra for proper bonding is "first degrease the bond surfaces, then sand the bond surfaces, degrease them again, bond".

            While thermosetting resins such as this epoxy cannot melt, but they have what is called a glass transition temperature ("Tg"). This is a temperature (range) where the behavior changes from hard and brittle to soft and rubbery. At an even higher temperature thermosets will degrade. In normal use you should stay at least 30 °C below the Tg.

            Unfortunately the website doesn't tell which limit the 300 °F represents. But I assume it is the maximum normal use temperature. Keep in mind that while a pan filled with water cannot be hotter than the boiling point of water, an empty pan or a pan filled with oil can become a lot hotter than 300 °F!



            Sent from my Nexus 10 using Tapatalk

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            • #7
              Ummm? Heat LOL. Read the writing on the wall. And you can localize heat, prolly said already. Get to it. JR
              My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

              https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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              • #8
                Methyl Chloride

                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chloromethane

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by CalM View Post

                  Now thats nice. I would suggest tric-111. it used to be the only solvent that would touch cured epoxy. And no gnarly ozone depleting chems. JR
                  Last edited by JRouche; 08-28-2017, 12:00 AM.
                  My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                  https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by CalM View Post
                    When I was in the Navy our Machinist Mates were using it for a cleaner. I got into a little bit and got my firearm clean. LOL the next two days I was peeling skin from my fingers, in slabs. It dries things out. Skin, metal parts. MEK, and the like are gone.

                    But.. There is Simple Green. My Dad likes it. JR
                    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by JRouche View Post
                      Now thats nice. I would suggest tric-111. it used to be the only solvent that would touch cured epoxy. And no gnarly ozone depleting chems. JR
                      The "ozone hole" seems to have made a remarkable recovery. far beyond expectations....

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by JRouche View Post
                        When I was in the Navy our Machinist Mates were using it for a cleaner. I got into a little bit and got my firearm clean. LOL the next two days I was peeling skin from my fingers, in slabs. It dries things out. Skin, metal parts. MEK, and the like are gone.

                        But.. There is Simple Green. My Dad likes it. JR
                        One would think any solvent that would "destroy epoxy" would also have detrimental effects on human flesh, Use the materials of your choice, but don't be ignorant.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Heat, yes. But just to throw another chemical solvent out there: nitromethane. Someone on here recommended it to me when a colleague accidentally epoxied an assembly to a granite surface plate! Worked great.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Fasttrack View Post
                            Heat, yes. But just to throw another chemical solvent out there: nitromethane. Someone on here recommended it to me when a colleague accidentally epoxied an assembly to a granite surface plate! Worked great.
                            Works somewhat even without nitro-part. Most epoxies have limited resistance against alcohols (but the process might take too long, days/weeks/months.) Methanol probably being faster than ethanol.

                            Oldschool (pre 2006) Nitromors paint stripper should also work but at least the european stuff doesn't contain dichloromethane anymore.
                            Not sure what the consumer-grade strippers in US contain.
                            Industrial dichloromethane-based paint stripper should also do the trick.

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                            • #15
                              So much easier outside of EU:
                              http://www.homedepot.com/p/Jasco-1-q...0202/202247418

                              If buying some other paint stripper pay attention not to get caustic stripper as it is probably corrosive to pot metal (contains something like lye, sodium/potassium hydroxide)

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