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It's alive ... IT'S ALIVE !!!! Old Sparky works !!!

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  • It's alive ... IT'S ALIVE !!!! Old Sparky works !!!

    So, I decided to test Old Sparky to see if she might work, and be worth the time and effort to put her back in service. I vacuumed out 20 years of dust, checked to make sure there was oil in the bearing boxes, made sure it turned over by hand, hooked her up to 220 V 1PH, performed arcane rituals of protection, checked my will, and threw the breaker !!!

    It was like a Frankenstein movie ! Sparks shot out about 3' in several directions... but only for a brief instant. There was a crackling noise, a sizzle for but the shortest periods of time, and by then I had already thrown the breaker... But it seemed like the sparks were only at the very beginning, and that they had ceased before I had even begun to move throw the breaker... So, after a cursory inspection to check that nothing was actively on fire, I flipped the breaker again !

    This time there weren't any 1950 movie special effects. There was a brief hum, and the motor spun up to speed... It sat there just turning away... making a little bit of noise, but over all, a happy motor. There is a little sparking between the brushes and the rotor, but nothing scary.

    SO, what is the recommended PM for an 1920's repulsion/induction motor ???



    OMG - I'm on my way to getting the Battle Shaper up and running. Wow.
    Last edited by Dan_the_Chemist; 08-31-2017, 08:16 PM.

  • #2
    keep oil in the bearing reservoirs.

    Check brushes every so often to make sure they are not work down.

    Look at commutator to see it is not scored or damaged.

    Keep it reasonably clean.

    If it is a "repulsion/induction" motor, the commutator should be automatically shorted out after starting. Straight repulsion do not short the motor, and there is a hybrid type as well.

    Pic of the data plate?
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
      Pic of the data plate?
      The name plate reads

      GE Repulsion Induction
      Model 106170
      SCR 836 CL 4 3 1800 110/220 60
      110 220
      27 13.5
      1755 3 HP CONTINUOUSLY 40
      Read GEH-597 before using
      Serial Number AH

      Comment


      • #4
        Dan,

        Did you get any tooling with the shaper? Are you going to strip it down for cleaning or clean it as bet you can assembled. I decided to strip the main pieces off my 16" G&E in order to clean it better and I must say it has turned into quite a project.

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        • #5
          OK, looks like you have the hybrid type. Nice. No starting switch or centrifugal shorting setup.

          Here is an explanation of the types.

          http://www.brighthubengineering.com/...ulsion-motors/
          1601

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

          Comment


          • #6
            That's just so dang cool!

            Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

            Comment


            • #7
              "read GEH-597". Good luck with that one. Classy old thing tho', ain't it?
              "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by nc5a View Post
                Dan,

                Did you get any tooling with the shaper? Are you going to strip it down for cleaning or clean it as bet you can assembled. I decided to strip the main pieces off my 16" G&E in order to clean it better and I must say it has turned into quite a project.
                I got the vise, a HYUGE rotary table (15" Troyke), too few tee-nuts, 4 huge Armstrong type tool holders for 1/2" HSS tools, three slotting bars (Daddy Bar, Momma Bar, and wee baby Bar...). If anybody has any large HSS bits suitable for a 24" shaper, I'll be happy to chat in PM.

                The thing had sat unused for 20 years - and although it was put away oiled the oil turned to goo. I wanted to pull the sliding surfaces apart so I could thoroughly clean out the ooky-oil and put in new way oil. In addition 20 years of shop dust and shop oil mist fell on the poor machine and created a 1/16" thick later of black sticky crud on the outside surfaces ... Grabbing any part of the machine left my hands looking like I had rubbed them over an oily crankcase... That is NOT how I like to work in the shop. Clean oil and clean cutting fluid is kewl. Dirty oil and grease is NOT kewl. So, I too decided to partially disassemble the thing into it's main components just so I could make sure the lubrication was good. As you say, it has turned into a project. Today I tore the clapper box and vertical slide into parts, cleaned everything, touched up some of the parts that had been dinged and had little raised bumps, polished the chrome handle on the top with a mop and rouge, toothbrushed the acme threads, and then reassembled it with clean oil. I finished the reassembly around midnight. Good day's work. It doesn't look new - it's obviously a well used part, but at least it's clean and some of the parts are sorta shiny. It will make me happy, and now in my dotage that is my goal !!!

                A good engine hoist would be a real help... unfortunately, I only have a Horrible Fright engine hoist and the wheels broke in the first hour. I've ordered the parts to make a nice medium sized gantry crane for the 500 pound table and 250 pound vise and 200+ pound rotary table. I used to carry anvils around for fun when I was in my 30's and 40's... but that was last century. Now, I want help.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I may still have a cutter here that is about 3/4" wide and 2" tall, by 8 or so inches long. It may be a brazed carbide, but that would still work for you.

                  If that size is good for the machine, you want it, and I can find it, it's yours for postage. I may have a left-over 1" or so square HSS bit also, ditto.

                  How big is the tool holder?
                  1601

                  Keep eye on ball.
                  Hashim Khan

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Probably shoulda warn you R/I motors start dramatically but run smooth and quiet thereafter.

                    It wouldn't hurt if the commutator was dressed. That's "dressed" as in follow a well defined procedure not merely "shine it up." There's ways to do it and when done correctly, brush sparking will be practically eliminated.

                    Chapter 7 of this Manual:

                    http://militarynewbie.com/wp-content...cians-Mate.pdf

                    contains information applicable to your motor particularly commutator and brush maintenance beginning page 7.8
                    Last edited by Forrest Addy; 09-01-2017, 01:38 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      It's clearly missing the warning label about not touching the brushes.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by dave_r View Post
                        It's clearly missing the warning label about not touching the brushes.
                        A century ago, lapses in electrical safety could have Darwinian consequences.

                        https://www.google.com/search?biw=11...pNveS4xSCC6-M:

                        Ever see old photos of line shaft shops with flapping belts and exposed gearing on every hand.

                        https://www.google.com/search?q=line...gYccXWXA6XtRM:

                        We come a long way.
                        Last edited by Forrest Addy; 09-01-2017, 02:52 AM.

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                        • #13
                          "It was like a Frankenstein movie"
                          It's pronounced Fronkensteen

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                          • #14
                            And thats 3 1920's horses, and they are a lot bigger than the horses of today.

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                            • #15
                              I have a 1939 4X12 Parks wood plane that I bought and refurbished in the 1970's. It came with a 2 hp Emerson Repulsion Induction motor that was brand NOS at the time. It weigh over 100 pounds and is the size of a medium watermelon. It's been a great motor and starts instantly.

                              When I bought the unit, I asked about spare brushes for the motor. The dealer said that he would sell them to me, but I would never need them since they lift clear at startup. He was right. They are still in a drawer.

                              JST would be proud. The motor was built at St. Louis when Emerson was at the top of their game.

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