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  • Dusty
    replied
    Jerry, A couple of suggestions from what I've seen in various shops. They are never big enough. I don't know if my cars will every go back in the garage. My dad recently put up a 24 * 50 storage shed (10 ft longer than he needed). It was full before it was finished. Make sure not to skimp on the concrete. Machine tools are of course heavy. I noticed you do blacksmithing. Depending on the size of your average pieces, it may be a good idea to have an extra thick section to the slab to set the anvil on. If you possess a trip hammer or are thinking of one, it may be appropriate to have one more. I like your decision on how to split up areas, Right now I've got three (Woodworking/electronics/material storage, machine tools/blacksmithing/welding/general assembly,& foundry) It would be nice to get all the hot work in one area and maybe have an area for painting and sandblasting some day. Something else I've found that is important is the doors. At least one big bay door makes life easier (more are even better!!). It's great when moving tools or supplies in and out. Extending the slab outside of a bay can be useful. There are many days I've wanted to take the cherry picker outside, but could not because small wheels like to sink into gravel. Don't make it too nice though, otherwise you may never see the inside of your house again.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    .

    [This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 09-02-2004).]

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  • Rugby10
    replied
    My dad has been thinking about adding a garage to the side of the house. We started looking and found these guys;

    http://www.steelbuilding.com/buildin...dings_main.htm

    They have a very interactive page that will allow you to design the steel buliding of your dreams, to your local county spec. At the end of the online process it will even quote you a price...Delivered. I don't think you can find a more comprehensive building webpage anywhere. No, I don't work for them.

    [This message has been edited by Rugby10 (edited 08-12-2004).]

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  • ibewgypsie
    replied
    WHEN I do my "other half"

    I really should've put a house vacuum system in. I really should have put a shallow ditch well in to run all the plumbing and slope it to the outside.

    If I was building another garage. I'd run a ditch right down the middle of each bay, run pvc conduit, air or whatever else I wanted in there with access boxes w/quick connects..
    Hook a exhaust fan up to pull out of the ditch and use it for paint exhaust under the car... You could wetsand the vehicle in there and wash the floor keeping my shop cleaner easier..

    As far as the fabrication side, well I'd want a piece of 5x10x+1/2" metal on the floor to tack to.. when I subframe a car it is good to have a anchor to tack weld supports to retain stock locations on bumpers and body mounts.

    And the machine side?
    Then the vacuum system.. whoo hoo.. wouldn't that be grand? but how do you vacuum up 10-12" spiral chips? Also a drain in that floor.. but covered in metal plate instead of grate. AND a private clean office with phone... my phone in my present shop.. well you better have a rag handy to hold it with..


    [This message has been edited by ibewgypsie (edited 11-11-2005).]

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  • Milacron of PM
    replied
    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by mayfieldtm:
    He buried 5" air duct in the concrete floor, all around for his dust collection system.
    I thought that was a good idea. Otta the way and easy to clean.
    Tom M.
    </font>
    Hope he *really* buried it, as the problem with anything buried in concrete where some weight runs across the floor are increased likelyhood of cracks in the floor.

    I once has wiring buried in the floor and after some years noticed cracks that followed the wiring run exactly.

    Also, if one ever runs water lines in concrete keep good plans as to exactly where they are located. I once rented a house that developed a leak in the hot water output line. Real cute problem as not only was the water bill sky high, so was the electric bill ! After digging up suspected areas with no results they eventually had to create a temporary new line in the attic just for us to get by !

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  • mayfieldtm
    replied
    A friend of mine just finished his 20' x 35' wood shop.
    He buried 5" air duct in the concrete floor, all around for his dust collection system.
    I thought that was a good idea. Otta the way and easy to clean.
    The shop ("Tough-Shed") went up in about 3 days, looks good and well built.
    Tom M.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Plus I want to put in a sound system so if nothing else I can jam to the tunes.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I am not trying to save money, I want a substantial building. It looks like I will be in Southeastern Ohio, the hills of Ohio.

    What I want is a strong building, one that I can a have garage door or a hanger door as a part of the main entrance. Then divider walls. Or maybe do 2 buildings. Right now I am doing all of this in my basement and my 2 car garage.

    I need to look at having four work areas, wood working, machining, delicate metal work/jewelry and blacksmithing.

    I have to put this all on 2 or 3 acres and leave room for outside storage, building a new house, etc. etc. etc.


    Jerry


    [This message has been edited by jfsmith (edited 08-12-2004).]

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  • Milacron of PM
    replied
    The problem with Morton buildings is they are a metal building, but with wood framing, such that you have to have conventional roof trusses and therefore loose the ceiling height advantages of the roof pitch of a typical steel frame metal building.

    I was tempted to buy a ex CNC machine shop that was out in the country near here that was a Morton building. 7,000 sq feet I could have bought for $75,000. But upon closer inspection I was very unimpressed with the building.

    Any money you might save with a wood frame construction you will more than loose when you resell eventually.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    .

    [This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 09-02-2004).]

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  • spkrman15
    replied
    My neighbour used to have one of those round metal buildings. He said "Never again" The structure was good and solid but he lost alot of space over head. Because it was round he could only put the hoist in the middle of the garage.

    Something to think about when it come time to build. nothing more frustrating then lowering the height of an in house crane because it won't lift over the machines due to the roof.

    If you build it yourself, and it comes time to install the trussing, just hire a boom truck. For the price and time it would be worth it....Just my opinion

    Rob

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  • WJHartson
    replied
    Jerry,

    I have a 40 x 50 metal building on a concrete slab. The manufacturer sent all of the plans as per my spec which layed out the foundation and all of the foundation bolt patterns for the steel beams. The building was erected by two people and a big fork truck in 3 days. It is insulated and has two 10 X 10 powered doors and a double mandoor. There are also 5 windows installed. I had it beefed up with heavier steel beams and roof sheeting material because I am so close to the Gulf of Mexico. Hurricanes can be a problem in this area. It has proven to be a great shop and very strong.

    Joe

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  • wierdscience
    replied
    One of our customers put one up,I believe it was 60x100,he found it was easyist to assemble the truss on top of a rolling scaffold that he built up to just higher than the finished truss,they he just rolled it into place and removed two blocks lowering it on to the anchor bolts,went like clock work and lots easier than trying to hang it all in the air.

    [This message has been edited by wierdscience (edited 08-11-2004).]

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I can setup the forms for the concrete and have a concrete company pour the foundation. I know I have to put gravel down and then run over the gravel with my borrowed "monster truck" to compact it, then pour and level.
    Then get the nail gun out and start building walls. I am not real keen on using a Gin Pole, but it may be neccessary for the roof trusses.

    Or I may just write a check, don't know yet.

    Jerry

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  • ibewgypsie
    replied
    On another post, there is a picture of a 4wd dodge powerwagon with a gin pole, a pair of pipes forming a tee with a cable going up to them for the winch.

    It is holding up in the air about five feet a farmall cub.

    That should hold a truss.

    In INdianna they use old trucks with a type arrangement to lift tractors for tire changes etc.. I have saw numerous 50 model trucks in fields with these.

    There are always numerous ways to accomplish anything. Depends on your perspective.

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