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  • ibewgypsie
    replied
    I live in the house, but the shop is my refuge... no silly sitcoms, no giggly friends..

    Just me and the pup and my greasy machines..




    [This message has been edited by ibewgypsie (edited 11-11-2005).]

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I just want it to stay at workable temperature, just get the machines started and let them warm up.

    I too, live in a house, the shop should be else where, in my case in the garage.


    Jerry

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    ITS A FRIGGIN SHOP, I DONT PLAN ON LIVEING IN IT, I DO THE WORK IN IT AND LIVE IN THE HOUSE. AND ISONEEN IS FLAME PROOF, I TURNS BLACK AND GOES OUT.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Archie,
    I know about heating, it ain't cheap. Some people in the area have gas wells on their land, so they heat cheap, but I probably won't be so lucky.
    I found a 15 x 20 chicken house in the area, modern construction and was heat with 2 wall type electric heaters, it was well insulated and the chicken moved out 15 years ago. I am not going to live there, but it told me a lot about what is needed to be done.

    Thanks,

    Jerry

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  • Milacron of PM
    replied
    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by IOWOLF:
    IF IT IS IN YOUR ATTIC , WHO CARES WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE.

    IT CAN BE AS UGLY AS IT CAN BE ,I CAN PRACTALLY HEAT THE SHOP WITH A MATCH.
    </font>
    I assumed you were talking about the typical use for sprayed on insualtion, which is on the walls and ceilings of Quanset hut type metal buildings.

    If in the attic of course it doesn't matter, but we're mostly talking metal buildings in this thread which usually means no attic.

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  • jeep_32
    replied
    JF, such a personal topic. I live near to the general area you are talking about. I have done much research,tire kicking and inspection. there was one of the KENTUCKY STEEL buildings put up by the road on the way home. Which gave me the opertunity to see it up close and personal. I was not impressed at all. we all want a compfortable enviroment to work and play in. I am in the process of building a shop. I am going to use 2x6 walls
    setting on a poured slab.
    sheathed inside and out with "Barn Metal".
    The best book on the subject I have found is
    "building the multi-use barn" I can find the
    ISBN If anyone is interested.
    nothing looks as good as a block building painted inside and out. but we are in the north and block buildings are expensive and expensive to heat.
    Just my opinion.
    Happy Hunting
    archie =) =) =)

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  • ibewgypsie
    replied
    IO:

    I'd live in a cave if I had one... I agree.. if it works it is great.

    Some building codes are not so liberal thou.

    I don't really like welding in a wood frame shop.. My grinder has blackened some spots here and there..




    [This message has been edited by ibewgypsie (edited 11-11-2005).]

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    IF IT IS IN YOUR ATTIC , WHO CARES WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE.

    IT CAN BE AS UGLY AS IT CAN BE ,I CAN PRACTALLY HEAT THE SHOP WITH A MATCH.

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  • retep
    replied
    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by D. Thomas:
    Sprayed insulation looks ok new but is some seriously ugly stuff when it gets old and dirty.</font>

    Curious though... It may be ugly as hell when the dust settles on it, but does it still work fine? Or does it start to compact down and loose it's insulation value?

    I've got that stuff in my attic, never really looked up there, so I only care if it works!

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  • Milacron of PM
    replied
    Sprayed insulation looks ok new but is some seriously ugly stuff when it gets old and dirty.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    JUST EMAIL ME FOR ALL THE INFO YOU NEED.
    MINE IT A 30X40 AND IT HAS SPRAY ON INSULATION(ISONEEN)SP?
    3 PEOPLE PUT IT UP I A WEEK.

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  • Bill Hood
    replied
    I may be prejudiced as I build metal all steel and wood post and beam buildings. I have never erected one of the curved roof--either the straight wall or the quansit type, but I don't want to either. I used to put up feed mills with thousands of bolts in the feed and grain bins and you wear the ends of your fingers off even with the best tools available. A tractor friend of mine recently bought a 38 x 65' Miracle Span building at an auction for $1200 new in crates and sitting inside. It was 7 years old and the owners did not want to put it up either and local contractors declined. It took him and three sons with forklift and good equipment 3 weeks to get it up. Then it did not have windows in sidewalls and he had to cut additional window and door openings in endwalls and weld frames. My steel supplier is Meuller Manuf out of Ballinger TX (they have wearhouses in TX, OK La and NM) and they sell what are called Kit buildings in several sizes. You can erect one with a forklift, tractor and loader, winch truck ect--I know as I have done all of the above. We set most of our steel with backhoe with stinger on bucket and then sheet with manlift mounted above bucket--saves on skytrack rental. Anywhere in US there are metal building fabricators who offer buildings like these--shop around and the prices are comprable with the others and are much more versitle. Whatever you do, figure what size you need and double it before you pour concrete or buy steel.
    Bear

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  • ibewgypsie
    replied
    My slab is 4" w/fibre hair reinforcement.

    I have it on a retaining wall on the back about 3 feet tall on a foundation 24" wide and at least 12" thick. The retaining wall is full of gravel w/no dirt. I am on the side of a hill. The concrete slab and foundation cost me $4000 (w/backhoe & bobcat rental), the building 2x4 and sheet steel cost $800, no finish inside.

    It is 24x24.. Now I have subdivided it inside, got too many machines in it. I got this perfectly good 24"x120" cinncinati lathe gave to me.. yeah it is in the corner of one side with things piled on it.. And then the 24" shaper-project-boat anchor. ANd the B&S 1900 drill press project. and the 50 ton press project... and..(harley,racecar,electronic parts).. My mill and leblond lathe occupy about a 8x8 space in the air conditioned side.. I do have room for my stereo and my beer fridge over my leblond on a shelf..

    As you may have guessed, it is too small.

    Tools are like having a 747, it'd be nice but where do you put them?



    [This message has been edited by ibewgypsie (edited 11-11-2005).]

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I know for the machines, like my mill and lathe, I may need to make the slab thicker in those areas or just make the whole slab thick. For my power hammer, that is a different situation. I am planning on leaving a well in the slab, then fill it with sand and put the hammer on the sand. The sand absorbs the beating that normally the floor gets.

    How thick are garage floors and how thick should I make the slab for this work building?


    I have plenty of time at the moment to do the planing as that we haven't gotten the land yet.


    Jerry

    [This message has been edited by jfsmith (edited 08-13-2004).]

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  • JPR
    replied
    ...Don't make it too nice though, otherwise you may never see the inside of your house again.

    one of my customer's did just that. Lower level of his house is the garage. Room for 3 cars, rest of the garage is raised 4" for water and snow. Left side is 30 foot of floor to ceiling cabinets. In front of the cars is a counter with sink and built in refrigerator. 40k in cabinets and Coran counters. Then the bathroom is in the right corner. On the right side is a leather couch, recliner and weight lifting area. Ceramic tile through out. The 27" TV is mounted on the wall of the bath room on a swivel (hospital style) so it can be rotated for viewing throughout the garage.

    I kept thinking, my house is not as nice (or cost as much) as his garage.


    [This message has been edited by JPR (edited 08-12-2004).]

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