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  • I think Dan is on to something. A way to preserve this fine work should be considered.
    Best regards,
    Jon

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    • The eccentric strap on the original Stuart models (shown in yellow) is very pretty, but difficult to make as it looks like it will require a lot of rotary table work on the outer perimeter. I have redesigned it so that it requires no rotary table work. It is made in two stages--first with definite corners on the left hand side, then mounted on a mandrel and the corners knocked down with a file. The end result looks fine, and requires no rotary table work at all.


      Brian Rupnow

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      • I'm not really sure how this is going to turn out, but it's ,uhmmm---interesting. The shape is very definitely there. Now that the basic shape is there, it's time to transfer into the 4 jaw on my lathe to bore and ream the 5/8" hole, 2" deep.
        Then if I'm lucky, I will part off four eccentric straps. I will do the tapped holes and sawcuts after all four straps are parted off.
        Brian Rupnow

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        • Well--That didn't turn out to shabby!! I still have to part the four straps off from the parent stock, and add threaded holes and saw cuts. I'm happy with it. Now if I can part it off without any disasters, I'm almost ready to start sorting out linkages.--Disregard the 3D drawing it's setting on. That's a design job I'm working on for a customer.
          Brian Rupnow

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          • This mornings work was to finish the eccentric straps. The long bolt represents the linkage which will extend up from the eccentric strap to the Stephensons reversing linkage. The clamp bolt at the sawcut allows tightening or loosening the fit of the strap to the eccentric itself, and the short bolt which you see extending into the bore fits into the slot in the eccentric to keep the strap from trying to fall of the eccentric as the engine runs.
            Brian Rupnow

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            • This afternoon I made the gland nuts for the steamchests. I'm done for today. I had a couple of thoughts today.--#1 thought--I have this thing finished to the point where another days work could see it running without the Stephensons reversing linkage. #2thought---I think I need to tap the holes in the side of my steam chests, otherwise I have no way to attach the pressure lines to it.--May have to tap the exhaust holes in the sides of the cylinders.
              Brian Rupnow

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              • Today was the day for slide valves and slide valve nuts. I had a lot of trouble with the slide valves.--You know how it is---Measure wrong, cut too deep, launch part across room, solder short end to add piece back on--Maybe my mother was right about not working on Sundays. At any rate, I persevered and finished the parts.
                Brian Rupnow

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                • Brian Rupnow

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                  • You certainly do like that loctite stuff.

                    Perhaps adding a thread to the inner and outer (with a slot in end of the screw that is the inner) would make it all just that bit more secure.

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                    • Norman--It doesn't need any threads. There are no forces trying to make the pin slide out endwise. Engine vibration might have some influence on the pin, but I can't take the chance that it MIGHT slide out of position.
                      Brian Rupnow

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                      • It looks from the pictures that the pin has clearance to be longer..... Evidently that is not so?

                        Could you cross drill next to the connecting rod for a pin through maybe? Assembly could be an issue, but there may be an angle at which it is accessible.
                        1601

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

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                        • There are thousands of these engines running with a threaded connector of some sort in that location with no problems. If concerned, a dab of removeable Loc-Tite on the threads will prevent any problem.

                          It does pay when running to give a quick inspection of the engine's overall condition prior to each run, done at the same time as lubricating.
                          Jim H.

                          Comment


                          • I did some research on this engine after I made the rods. The original rods were bored on one side of the clevis and threaded on the opposite side, and used a shoulder bolt style pin with a very low hex head. Whoops--I had already finished the rods with equal plain holes on both sides. They are aluminum so I can't solder one hole shut and then thread it.---And no, I'm not going to remake the rods.
                            Brian Rupnow

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                            • You could still make the wrist pin solid, with a 3/16" flange on one end and say, a 5-40 female thread on the other end. A 5-40 capscrew with a 3/16" diameter head to hold it in place. You could either slot or make the flange and screw head hex, low profile of course.
                              Jim H.

                              Comment


                              • Let me be the first to point out----I'm not really good at making these small clevises. When parts get this small, (1/4" square) I have a difficult time getting them to be cosmetically correct. The reamed thru holes are correct, and the #5-40 (1/8 dia.") threads are in the right place, but the overall outer shape always leave a bit to be desired. You will notice that I have made extra of each type. This lets me pick the best ones out of the lot and discard the really bad ones.
                                Brian Rupnow

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