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  • Second radial cut. Not as much breath holding this time, as I was able to use a 3/8" endmill. I'm running the mill at about 900 rpm, and cranking the rotary table slowly, cutting in both clockwise and counterclockwise direction. I advance the tool 0.010" each time I get to the end of a rotation. In a way part of this is climb milling, but a great deal more of the cut is endmilling.
    Brian Rupnow

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    • This is as much as I'm going to do today. There is more that I can chew away before tearing down this set-up, but this is as far as it's going today.
      Brian Rupnow

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      • In hindsight, I wish now that I had put both plates on my fixture and machined them both a once. Since I can only take about 0.010" depth of cut for fear of breaking my 0.156 endmill, it wouldn't have been a problem if I'd had both plates on there.---live and learn.
        Brian Rupnow

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        • Have you tried spray silicone lubricant with your viton o-rings?

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          • Originally posted by bob_s View Post
            Have you tried spray silicone lubricant with your viton o-rings?
            No I haven't tried that. The ring is totally encased in a cylinder.
            Brian Rupnow

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            • No need for any dis-assembly, being a spray lube, you could have the engine self ingest the lubricant by injecting in the steam chests until a drop formed in the exhaust port.
              Silicone acts like micro-ball bearings between any sliding surfaces.

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              • Ahhhhh!!!

                An endmill in a drill chuck! Come on,I know you have collets for your mill!!

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                • Originally posted by sid pileski View Post
                  Ahhhhh!!!

                  An endmill in a drill chuck! Come on,I know you have collets for your mill!!
                  Pfui....

                  I've done that too, and it works OK, even if I don't like doing it. I've done it because if I use the EM in the MT3 horizontal spindle, I have no MT3 holder for 0.187" shank end mills, and only have MT2 collets in that size. Adapters of course block the drawbar, and I do have an MT3 shank on a drill chuck for the mill (and an MT2 as well).

                  Lightning does not strike, it's OK.. ... Brian does such nice work that I'd never quibble on that sort of thing.....
                  1601

                  Keep eye on ball.
                  Hashim Khan

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                  • If your trying to obtain higher precision, that’s not the way.
                    Plus if your after a .156 finished slot width, starting with a .156 endmill in a chuck won’t get you there...

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                    • I do it all the time. I get away with it most times because the endmills are small. I do have proper collets for my larger endmills.
                      Brian Rupnow

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                      • Bob_s--I may try that. I have a couple of spray cans of silicone for waterproofing leather coats. I wonder if that would work?
                        Brian Rupnow

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                        • Originally posted by sid pileski View Post
                          If your trying to obtain higher precision, that’s not the way.
                          Plus if your after a .156 finished slot width, starting with a .156 endmill in a chuck won’t get you there...
                          Sid--I knew that, or at least "in theory" I knew that. I could have started out with a 1/8" endmill and then offset it to reach the 0.156" measurement. Conventional knowledge seems to be that I wouldn't end up with an exact 0.156" slot even if the cutter was held in a collet. However, all is not lost. There's a trick. I am the one who makes the roller that rolls in that slot, and I can make it to whatever the slot ends up as.--I just checked the slot width with a Vernier caliper and it measures about 0.160" but it's still in the set-up and rather difficult to measure at the moment.
                          Brian Rupnow

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                          • Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                            I do it all the time. I get away with it most times because the endmills are small. I do have proper collets for my larger endmills.
                            Have you ever checked the run out?

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                            • Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                              ..... I am the one who makes the roller that rolls in that slot, and I can make it to whatever the slot ends up as...;...
                              And that is THE thing to keep in mind in this hobby! We're not making a load of interchangeable parts. All we have to do is match two parts together...

                              Dimensions on a print can usually be considered "guides".

                              I love hand made....

                              Pete
                              1973 SB 10K .
                              BenchMaster mill.

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                              • Just as a side note;

                                Brian said "Lots and lots of breath holding and butt clenching going on!!!"

                                and Sid said "Ahhhhh!!! An endmill in a drill chuck!"


                                The two are related. A drill chuck will often have a lot of run-out. A lot of run-out combined with a small end mill results in more wear and stress as the mill essentially acts like it's doing an interrupted cut. Some say you effectively end up with a single tooth cutter as the mill follows an eccentric (???) path.

                                There should be less pucker factor if you simply change to a collet.

                                Dan
                                At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

                                Location: SF East Bay.

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