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  • I see that my first post on this engine was on the 4th of September. That's two and one half months of my life that demanded work on the engine just about every day. I'm sure that many were bored to tears with my posts from almost every day, but they mostly all showed the constant development of the engine. It was fun, taught me a few things, and was a nice break from i.c. engines. I still want to develop a nice intake and exhaust set-up for this engine, but I'm relieved that it is 99% finished and that it ran. This is the first time I have downloaded a 3D model from someone I don't know and have never met, and created drawings and working components from it. Whoever created that 3D model did an excellent job. I found one very minor error, and that was all. When you consider the vast quantity of math data that goes into developing accurate 3D models, this guy was first class. Thank you to all who commented or helped out along the way. The fat lady hasn't sang yet, there will be a few more posts showing the intake and exhaust manifolds, but we are almost thru here. It's been a great build.
    Brian Rupnow

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    • Thanks again Brian! Really enjoyed it.

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      • Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
        ... I'm sure that many were bored to tears with my posts from almost every day, ...
        Nothing could be further from the truth. I enjoy following along on your builds. I think this engine has a very pleasing sound when it's running.
        Location: Long Island, N.Y.

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        • Now you just need to build the boiler tank so it's a proper steam engine.

          I remember growing up, we had a small steam engine, maybe 1/4" bore, about 3/4" stroke or so, with a water tank about 3" long x 1.5" round, fill it with water, then use small bits of wood or little cubes of "something" (don't know what it was) that would burn and boil the water. It was fun seeing how hot you could get the tank to make the engine go faster.

          Something like this:
          https://www.ministeam.com/acatalog/J...0.html#SID=248

          Only the one we had was safe for use by children under 14. It must have used a different kind of flame.

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          • Dave,
            I think those for younger persons ran on alcohol or the solid version of alcohol if I remember. I had one as a kid.
            Glenn Bird

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            • Nah--I've made it thru 71 years without blowing myself up or burning myself badly. No boilers for me. Compressed air does fine, costs me nothing, and I've had the compressor for 30 years.
              Brian Rupnow

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              • Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                ....... Compressed air does fine, costs me nothing, and I've had the compressor for 30 years.
                It apparently is true that a lot of ER visits have the victim saying "I've been doing that for years with no problems"......... Just sayin', yah know.....
                1601

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan

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                • Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                  It apparently is true that a lot of ER visits have the victim saying "I've been doing that for years with no problems"......... Just sayin', yah know.....
                  It sets in the garage under my wife's bedroom----Not mine.
                  Brian Rupnow

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                  • always enjoy following your posts Brian, great interesting stuff. Much appreciated.

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                    • Your creation looks and runs like a champ - as per your usual flawless constructions.

                      Way back when you posted your first test run, forward only, I had left my browser on that particular YouTube channel. One of the following videos was from an original Stuart engine as used in a pumping station. It looked to be about 3 stories high, not including the several stories of pump. It took a whole lot more to get it going. Well worth looking at!
                      Last edited by bob_s; 11-17-2017, 08:14 PM. Reason: Duplicate

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                      • Your post are always very interesting and informative. Thank you and congratulations on what I am sure will be a great and beautiful engine.
                        T

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                        • I have a bunch of hexagon brass rods 7/16" across the flats which my friend gave me last year for fixing his motorcycle sprocket. I think they will make pretty cool looking intake and exhaust manifolds.
                          Brian Rupnow

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                          • Just a little bit of Loctiting/soldering/hole plugging/polishing, and the beast will have manifolds.
                            Brian Rupnow

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                            • I've silver soldered as much as I dare. This goes into my citric acid pickle solution now and sets overnight. Tomorrow I will "dress" the ends of the hexagon parts , clean up any remaining crud with a brass bristle brush, then Loctite things into place on the engine.
                              Brian Rupnow

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                              • And this, gentlemen, is THE END! The manifolds turned out very nice, the engine runs in forward and reverse, the project is completely finished. Thank you to all who have tagged along for this build.---Brian

                                Brian Rupnow

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