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  • #31
    Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
    BCRider--I'm glad that you stopped by and had a look. I did seriously consider what you are suggesting, but that would require a length of brass 3 1/2" in diameter. I don't know if you have priced brass lately, but its high enough to cause severe heart palpitations.---Brian
    Use cast iron instead.....

    Probably was bronze anyway, as that is better with steam, but the price of bronze is no lower, probably higher.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

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    • #32
      Dan--That's the beauty of what I do. The first person ever to design this engine seen the cross head guides and support legs as a casting because that's the way he visualized it in his mind. I've looked at it and seen what seems to me to be the easiest way for me to manufacture it is a number of pieces soldered together. You look at it, and see another version again. The only constraints are the functionality of the finished part. Aesthetically, there are an infinite number of ways to do this.
      Brian Rupnow

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      • #33
        So--To build this, I can use brass, steel, or a combination of brass and steel. The round center portion can be either material with no penalties. The legs are going to be nasty to cut the half round in where they mate to the cylinder. Since brass is so much easier to machine than steel, I see the legs as definitely made from brass. The feet can be either metal, again with no penalties. I have all of the material in stock to make it this way. I'll have to think a bit about the round part--I have the material for it in steel but not in brass.
        Brian Rupnow

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        • #34
          The legs could be machined from a single piece of half inch plate.

          Mount the plate in the vice then drill and/or bore the curve for the round portion. Once that is done put the plate on it side and mill away the area unwanted portions.

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          • #35
            Not bad, Norman. I don't have any 1/2" brass plate, only 1/4", but that method sounds so good I think I'll buy some 2" x 1/2" brass flatbar tomorrow.--Sure looks like there would be less heart-ache in doing it that way than what I was thinking of.---Brian
            Last edited by brian Rupnow; 09-05-2017, 09:31 PM.
            Brian Rupnow

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            • #36
              Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
              The legs are going to be nasty to cut the half round in where they mate to the cylinder.
              If I'm reading the print correctly, clamp the leg in the milling vise at 21 degrees. Run a 13/16" end mill into the leg. If you don't have a cutter
              of the required diameter, use something smaller (1/2") and cut to the required depth (13/32"?). Then set a fly cutter to 13/16" effective diameter
              and nibble away until you once again hit the required depth.
              Location: Long Island, N.Y.

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              • #37
                Rich--That was my original plan, but I like Normans plan better. It is difficult to set something up on a slant in the mill vice and not have it move when taking a long deep cut vertically thru it. I have to buy a bit of brass anyways, so a bit of 2"x 1/2" brass won't break the bank.---Brian
                Brian Rupnow

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                • #38
                  Put an end mill in the 3 jaw chuck of a lathe.
                  Clamp the 1/2 inch wide leg to the compound of the lathe.
                  Shim to correct height.
                  Use compound to set angle.
                  Bore hole.

                  This is how I notch tubing for building tubular car chassis. Only I use a hole saw because the stock is hollow.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                    Rich--That was my original plan, but I like Normans plan better. It is difficult to set something up on a slant in the mill vice and not have it move when taking a long deep cut vertically thru it. I have to buy a bit of brass anyways, so a bit of 2"x 1/2" brass won't break the bank.---Brian
                    I needed to make a few of these 316 SS pieces to brace a 1.25" tube:

                    The aluminum block just behind it is a fixture to hold the piece at 45 degrees. When placed in the vice it provides plenty of grip.
                    The endmill was run horizontally into the lower end. Now here's the good part. When the endmill is raised to cut the upper end,
                    the sum of the 2 angles will be 90 degrees. So after cutting your 21 degree angle, the other end will wind up at 69 degrees so
                    it sits flat on the table when installed. The fixture could be as simple as a slab of aluminum with channel milled across it at your
                    angle.
                    Location: Long Island, N.Y.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                      BCRider--I'm glad that you stopped by and had a look. I did seriously consider what you are suggesting, but that would require a length of brass 3 1/2" in diameter. I don't know if you have priced brass lately, but its high enough to cause severe heart palpitations.---Brian
                      Oh..... yeah, turning that much brass or bronze into chips would certainly affect my Scottish half too....

                      I'd assumed "casting" from the kit meant "cast iron". So using something like leaded steel would have been an option.

                      But this is old news now. You are on your way with your own method. Looking forward to another build developing.
                      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                      • #41
                        If the legs are to be machined from a piece of plate in order to create a good fit for the round portion, then it might also assist in the setup if the round portion were to be attached (silver soldered I am presuming) before the surplus material is machined away.

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                        • #42
                          Okay--how are we going to do this?---Maybe--Start with a piece of 1/2" flatbar, with the overall height and width and thickness machined to match the outside of the legs.
                          Last edited by brian Rupnow; 09-06-2017, 08:23 PM.
                          Brian Rupnow

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                          • #43
                            Stick it in the mill vice with a piece of aluminum packing on both sides and drill then bore the 13/16" diameter hole as shown. The aluminum packing on both sides protects the jaws of my mill vice, and more importantly, prevents ripping at the top of the legs where they become a sharp corner.
                            Last edited by brian Rupnow; 09-06-2017, 08:24 PM.
                            Brian Rupnow

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                            • #44
                              Then we go in and hog away the center material, leaving it as shown.
                              Last edited by brian Rupnow; 09-06-2017, 08:24 PM.
                              Brian Rupnow

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                              • #45
                                I turn the cylindrical portion to the correct finish diameter and the turned down section is at finished length. The larger diameter is left about 1" longer than it will end up so I can chuck it in the lathe. I will probably make a holding fixture to hold both parts in the correct relationship to each other, and do my silver soldering at this stage.
                                Last edited by brian Rupnow; 09-06-2017, 08:25 PM.
                                Brian Rupnow

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