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  • #46
    Immediately after silver soldering the parts together and letting them cool, I will mill away the center portion of the flatbar, so that I am left with the two legs, soldered firmly (we hope) in place. I will probably then put the large diameter of the guide into the lathe chuck and take a very light cut to "true up" the ends of the legs.
    Last edited by brian Rupnow; 09-06-2017, 08:26 PM.
    Brian Rupnow

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    • #47
      At this stage, I will drill and ream the center hole to finished size in the lathe, then over to my chuck on my rotary table to machine the slot in.
      Last edited by brian Rupnow; 09-06-2017, 08:27 PM.
      Brian Rupnow

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      • #48
        And now its back into the lathe and parted off to the correct length. The feet on the bottom of the legs will be silver soldered on as separate pieces.
        Last edited by brian Rupnow; 09-06-2017, 08:27 PM.
        Brian Rupnow

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        • #49
          Perhaps put the feet on the legs while the large diameter portion still exists so that the base of those feet can be given a wee trim in the lathe as well.

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          • #50
            Seems like a lot of wasted material. Why not make a simple fixture of the inside "A" shape that you both clamp the legs to, to machine, then also use it it to solder the cylinder all before un-clamping.

            edit: Then again I may be getting lost in the size (or lack thereof) of this project..... and it's probably easier to machine from solid

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            • #51
              Dan, I did consider that approach, but these things are really pretty darn small. The amount of material "lost" isn't going to amount to much. I paid $43 this morning on the way to my temporary "office job" for a piece of 2" x 1/2" x 6" long brass flatbar and a piece of round brass 1 1/2" diameter x 6" long. I ran out of design work at noon, so I came home and played in my shop this afternoon. I have the two pieces cut from flatbar to finished size (setting on the lathe way) and one end of the round bar turned to 1 3/8" diameter and 13/16" diameter on one end. The finished bore of the round bar will be 5/8". I decided to drill and ream to 1/2" diameter full length of the turned section while it was still in the lathe to give good concentricity, and to #1--take away some of the mass where I will be silver soldering and #2--to give me a "sized hole" to act as a good register for an improvised fixture which will hold the pieces together in the correct relationship while I solder them.
              Brian Rupnow

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              • #52
                Fixture rod to hold things in correct relationship for silver soldering.
                Brian Rupnow

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                • #53
                  If you did it with the feet on it already, you could just bolt them down to the baseplate for soldering. You'd KNOW they would fit up after that.

                  Probably you are committed now.
                  1601

                  Keep eye on ball.
                  Hashim Khan

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                    If you did it with the feet on it already, you could just bolt them down to the baseplate for soldering. You'd KNOW they would fit up after that.

                    Probably you are committed now.
                    I'm still working on that part of the equation. Most of this stuff is "Make it up as I go along." I'd like to make up the feet and solder them onto the legs before I part off the cylindrical piece, so I can true up the bottom of the feet while holding the cylindrical piece in the lathe.
                    Brian Rupnow

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                      I'm still working on that part of the equation. Most of this stuff is "Make it up as I go along." I'd like to make up the feet and solder them onto the legs before I part off the cylindrical piece, so I can true up the bottom of the feet while holding the cylindrical piece in the lathe.
                      That should work. Wasn't sure how you were thinking of doing those.

                      Might need a light touch on the cutter, but do-able for sure.

                      Lots of workable choices on how to do most things in the shop.
                      1601

                      Keep eye on ball.
                      Hashim Khan

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                      • #56
                        Hang on, boys and girls--here we go---


                        Brian Rupnow

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                        • #57
                          Ingenious bit of planning and execution there Brian! Well played.

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                          • #58
                            Okay---we are ready for silver soldering. The alignment rod is turned from a bit of scrap aluminum. My original thought was to make it from steel, but there is too much chance of soldering the alignment rod to everything else.
                            Brian Rupnow

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                            • #59
                              How do you get the alignment rod out?

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                              • #60
                                How do I get the guide rod out? Well, in a perfect world, I would have just pulled it out. In my world, today anyways, it refused to budge so I drilled it out. The bore in the round part was purposely left 1/8" undersize in case this happened. All in all, other than some very lumpy silver soldering, things went pretty good. I drilled out the guide rod, then drilled to 21/32" full depth, then reamed with a 5/8" reamer full length. Then I dressed the ends of the legs to make them equal---just a light .005" cut while spinning in the lathe. When I go to do the second one, I'll put a bigger tip on my acetylene torch to get a bit more heat into things.
                                Brian Rupnow

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