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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    I have the first eccentric sub assembly fixtured and ready for silver soldering in the morning. I drilled the center out of the 5/8" fixture rod, leaving only a 1/32" wall so that it doesn't act as a big heat sink. There is a very slight air gap between the eccentric strap and the aluminum fixture plate, probably only about .005", but that will stop a lot of heat from being sucked out of the brass strap end as I solder it. The 1/8" pin which locates the small brass end can be pressed out from the far side if I need to in order to remove the sub assembly from the fixture. I have to do two sub assemblies like this and two with a .25" offset bent into the 1/8" rod. I'll let you know how I made out in the morning.

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    This quest for a reversing engine is taking me in some strange directions. I finally have all of the pieces made, tomorrow I will silver solder up the eccentric strap sub assemblies. In the picture you will see a couple of 1/8" shafts with hex nuts soldered to the ends of them. They are destined to be sawn in half and then threaded on the cut ends to yield four hex bolts.

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    I've just had one of those days where it seems I worked awfully hard for minimal results. Most days I go like a whirling dervish and at the end of the day I have a collection of parts to show what I've been doing. Today I made three parts and figured out how to make the final three. I really hope this reversing mechanism works. It is very interesting and there seems to be a lot of small parts involved. I should know in the next two or three days.

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    I am getting to the point where all the major links and levers for the reversing system are finished. I have a few itsy bitsy pieces to make and then I'm ready to try this reverse business out. All of the blue parts in the model are finished.

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  • 10KPete
    replied
    Nice handle! Most would just polish the end but, no, you go and knurl it! Great touch.

    Pete

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    Hi Sasquatch--It's nasty here tonight too. Cold, wet, about an inch of snow. Weatherman is calling for possibility of 6" of lake effect snow. Good night to stay in and set by the fire.---Brian

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  • sasquatch
    replied
    Damned Sweet. Love it!! (Highways being shut down here, big temp drops comming! Lol)

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    Every reversing engine needs a reverse handle, and now mine has one!!

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  • sid pileski
    replied
    Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
    Okay, it's time to ask for an opinion. I am going to require a total of four eccentric strap assemblies. Two with straight rods connecting the ends and two on which the rods have a 1/4" offset. In the normal course of affairs, I would thread everything and screw all the pieces together. Although they look huge in this picture, they are only 1.646" center to center. I have a fixture to mount everything on at the exact centers required, and it is imperative that all four center to center distances are exactly the same. I'm thinking to myself "Why not set them up one at a time in the fixture and silver solder the rods to both ends?" The only adjustable thread required would be on the rod which passes thru the valve nut, to center the valve for timing the engine correctly, and the rotational position of the eccentrics on the crankshaft. Opinions please.---Brian
    First thing I would consider is soft soldering. The parts are all brass?
    Or, practice your silver soldering on some other parts.

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    I really do try to make something each day. Some days it's not much. These little guys are destined to become drag links.

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  • Toolguy
    replied
    The soldered joints will contract on cooling. You may want to make a half pin for the upper clevis that's a slip fit in the fixture hole. To solder, have the flat facing the center of the fixure, then after cooling, turn the pin 180 degrees to relieve the pressure and get the parts off more easily.

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  • JCHannum
    replied
    Fixturing them would be the best method.

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    Okay, it's time to ask for an opinion. I am going to require a total of four eccentric strap assemblies. Two with straight rods connecting the ends and two on which the rods have a 1/4" offset. In the normal course of affairs, I would thread everything and screw all the pieces together. Although they look huge in this picture, they are only 1.646" center to center. I have a fixture to mount everything on at the exact centers required, and it is imperative that all four center to center distances are exactly the same. I'm thinking to myself "Why not set them up one at a time in the fixture and silver solder the rods to both ends?" The only adjustable thread required would be on the rod which passes thru the valve nut, to center the valve for timing the engine correctly, and the rotational position of the eccentrics on the crankshaft. Opinions please.---Brian

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    This is a very well done assembly video of the engine I am building. The reverse mechanism has a few minor differences, but the video is amazingly well done.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M9r7gw-XxIc

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  • Dan Dubeau
    replied
    Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
    I have heard most of the conventional wisdom about two flute versus four flute, holding endmills in chucks, etcetera. I believe 99% of it, unless personal experience shows me something different. Some of the things I've heard, I haven't yet had the opportunity to verify.
    As with most of everything in this trade, there is a "theoretically perfect" way of doing everything. There are also about 10-30 OTHER ways of doing it that will also net acceptable results. Sometimes you just work with what you got, and give it your best shot. It looks to me like you're doing that. Nice job. I enjoy watching your projects come together Brain, thanks for sharing.

    And by the way, while not "proper" and under the category of "your really shouldn't do this if you can help it". Holding endmills in drill chucks has been done, and will continue to be done for years. Sometimes it's all you got, sometimes, it's just not worth cranking the knee up/down to change tooling when space is tight. Even more so with smaller cutters down in tight pockets. It's not like you're hogging a channel out with a corncob.

    Another handy trick is to keep an assortment of undersized endmills around. A 0.480 end mill is pretty handy for cutting a 0.500 slot.

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