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  • #61
    So, here we are, with the first soldered assembly 99% finished. I still have to drill 4 holes in the top flange, and probably some counterbores in the end of the legs where they reach the foot plate so a #5 shcs can fit flush with the top side of the foot plate. I have to go over everything with a scotchbrite pad to take the filing/sanding marks out. Who can recomend a good pickling solution available in Ontario that I can soak this thing in to get rid of the black "pits" that are marginally below the surface, so can't really be sanded out.---Brian
    Brian Rupnow

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    • #62
      Brian:- Plain old muriatic acid from Canadian Tire, cut 1: 2 with water, but do it in the back yard. If you can find it in Barrie, concentrated sulfuric acid is a better choice since it has virtually no corrosive fumes. Make a 10% solution. It IS readily available; I buy it in Ottawa, but they do require ID and signatures etc. It is about $20.00 for a 4 liter jug, (several lifetimes supply!)
      Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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      • #63
        Thank you Duffy. I will check today at CTC. ---Brian
        Brian Rupnow

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        • #64
          I asked on all 3 forums I post in, for pickling formulas. I have been advised to use sulphuric acid, also muriatic acid, and also citric acid. Sulphuric and Muriatic acid scare me a bit, whereas citric acid seems safe enough to work with, but takes longer. Up I went to the Bulk food store and bought a bottle of citric acid powder for $5. I mixed six heaping teaspoons with a pint of hot water, and dropped in the part I made yesterday. It didn't explode nor create a bunch of fizzing bubbles (I was kind of disappointed actually). I will leave the part submerged for 24 hours and then let you know what the results were.
          Brian Rupnow

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          • #65
            Oh my God--It really does work!!! The part has been soaking in my citric acid solution for an hour. I couldn't see any visual changes in the dark areas. (these dark areas were below the main surface of the parts, and could not be removed by sanding nor wire brushing.) I reached down into the container with my scribing tool and scratched a little at one of the dark areas, and was immediately rewarded with the sight of clean brass. This encouraged me to remove the part from the citric acid bath and scrub it under running water with a little brass bristled brush I have that looks almost exactly like a toothbrush. All of the black areas are gone completely. I am totally impressed!!!
            Brian Rupnow

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            • #66
              Here is a question I have never asked before. I would like to do some more finish sanding on this part to clean up the last of the file marks. The part has a really odd shape. I have a roll of #280 grit carborundum cloth x 1" wide that I use for cleaning up turnings in my lathe, but it is of course pretty floppy stuff. Ideally, I would like to buy something like a 3/8" wide strip or 1/4" round of this grit, but rigid so I can use it the way I would a file. Somebody must make a thing like that, but I have never seen it. The closest I have seen to it is way back in the day when I was a junior draftsman we had something similar, a flat wooden strip about 4" long x 1" wide with "tear off strips" of sandpaper on it for keeping a deadly point on our drafting pencils.--HOLD ON--Google is my friend. I just found something close to what I was talking about.--Come to think of it, I think my wife has something like that for doing her fingernails.
              https://www.amazon.com/DuraSand-Sand.../dp/B00G14F41E
              Last edited by brian Rupnow; 09-10-2017, 04:32 PM.
              Brian Rupnow

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              • #67
                Ladies emery boards found in the same department as Nail Polish. Or some spray adhesive, abrasive paper and some thin strips of wood. Instead of the wood use some sheet metal flashing or similar. Also some dowel if looking for round tools.

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                • #68
                  HaH--Found flat sticks in Kitchener and round ones at Princess Auto. We have a Princess Auto right here in Barrie.
                  https://www.princessauto.com/en/deta....pal-prod-com1
                  http://www.chippingaway.com/shop/woo...cks-and-belts/
                  Brian Rupnow

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                  • #69
                    You're buying sticks???!!! I buy one width of roll, 1 1/2". 180, 220, 320 grit. Use files for backers, all sizes 14" to needle. Make shapes from wood sticks; dowels, popcikle sticks, firewood, whatever.

                    Tear roll to length and rip tear to width.

                    Why pay for more than the abrasive??

                    Oops, back to you Brian!

                    Pete
                    1973 SB 10K .
                    BenchMaster mill.

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                    • #70
                      Well Sir--I didn't even have to leave my house. I went upstairs and begged an emery board from my good wife (for filing fingernails). I hunted around in my shop and found an ignition points file, and found a new Scotchbrite pad while I was looking for it. The resulting finish is far from being show quality, but it is "good enough" for now. I will consider using a bit of filler and painting them when all is done, but that's a long way off.
                      Brian Rupnow

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                      • #71

                        That's the spirit!!

                        Pete
                        1973 SB 10K .
                        BenchMaster mill.

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                        • #72
                          Wise to avoid the muriatic etc. They often will preferentially dissolve the zinc in brass and give a resulting copper surface.
                          1601

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

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                          • #73
                            Having made one of the soldered "stands", I now have to make a second one. What did I learn from making the first one. First of all, use a bigger torch head.--I can do that, as I have a larger torch head available. Secondly, when soldering on the "feet", don't hold the bar that ultimately becomes the "feet" endwise in a vice.-As soon as the brass gets hot enough to solder, the brass bar will deform from the pressure of the vice and go all wonky. That is why one foot on the finished stand looks fine, while the other foot has a definite wedge shape to it. I think those are the only major things. These are about the most complex shapes that I have made from brass bits silver soldered together.
                            Brian Rupnow

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                            • #74
                              I am really impressed with how well this citric acid works as a pickling solution for cleaning up parts that have been silver soldered together. I had tried mixtures of vinegar and hydrogen peroxide before (as recommended by somebody on one of the forums) but it didn't seem to be very effective. Now I'm wondering about something else--I see that builders of model steam engines don't seen to use flux on their parts which they are silver soldering together. Instead they soak the items being soldered in a pickling solution before they silver solder them, and don't appear to be using any flux. I have always used flux on the parts I am going to silver solder. Who can shed a bit of light on this subject?
                              Brian Rupnow

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                              • #75
                                I'm following this build also Brian, Nice work.

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