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Harbor Freight Mill Drill Moving

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  • #31
    I have the older HF "red mill/drill" which I bought around 2003. I was able to uncrate it while it was in my old Isuzu Trooper, and I disassembled it to some extent and moved the pieces into my house. I built a heavy wooden workbench on casters, and I was able to move the pieces on a dolly and then lift them up with a chain hoist I installed between ceiling beams. This is the hoist after I had the ceiling finished with exposed beams:



    My mill as pictured in the HF manual for item #42976:

    http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
    Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
    USA Maryland 21030

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    • #32
      I have moved a couple of those Mill Drills,run a sling down through the column anchor the sling on the underside of base.They do not lift level,they tilt forward a bit but no chance of it coming unhooked and all you remove is the top cap if has one.I seen one once that the column was about 4-1/2' feet tall,the fellow said he bought it new like that,only one ever seen with extended column.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by bollie7 View Post
        If you buy an engine hoist, try and get one with a swivel hook. I'm not sure what is available over there, but here in Australia, most of the engine hoists that are affordable to a home machinist are cheap Chinese units with a fixed hook. Its a real PIA. ....
        By your description I think we have something similar. Know the issue with the fixed chain well and agree is PITA.

        An option is to replace the hook and chain with one of these Round Eye Swivel Lifting Hooks.

        The true higher rated ones are a bit big for my taste ... plus they get pretty spendy pretty quick.

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        • #34
          I moved that same mill down into, and up out of the basement, 15 years apart.

          For the trip down the stairs me and a buddy took it apart into two pieces (the head, and the base and column). It was a lot like work even being 20 years younger.

          For the trip up the stairs, me and the purchaser took it apart into 3 pieces, and it was still a lot of work.

          I built a ground level shop so I won't have to do that again!

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          • #35
            Just a wild thought, if that column is a pipe or open all the way through, why not drop a chain down through it and put a bar or heave bolt through the bottom of the chain and lift using the chain?
            _____________________________________________

            I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
            Oregon Coast

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            • #36
              Sounds like it's the weight of the item that's the biggest challenge when moving this unit. I suggest lifting from the base with several nylon straps..

              Or just pick that dang cute little thing up with your fingers.

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              • #37
                Don't remove the column? Why do you say that? I have experience with a round column mill. One of the first things I noticed was the column was NOT perpendicular to the table or to the table's travel axis. I had to loosen it and add shims to get proper tram.

                As for moving that turkey, the first thing I would say is, "GET SOME HELP", even if you have to pay for it. And plan each step carefully. Buy or rent whatever you need.



                Originally posted by Norman Bain View Post
                Would assist heaps if you provided a link to a site that showed a photo of the type of mill.

                Regardless, I would recommend that you do NOT remove the column from the base; especially if the mill is the round column type. For the round column type that connection should be left alone.
                Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 10-18-2017, 02:36 PM.
                Paul A.
                SE Texas

                And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                You will find that it has discrete steps.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                  As for moving that turkey, the first thing I would say is, "GET SOME HELP", even if you have to pay for it. And plan each step carefully. Buy or rent whatever you need.
                  I had that thought too. To clarify, if you are moving a 300# lump of steel and manage to get a hand trapped, you may be there a long time waiting for help. There are certain positions where you just don't have muscles that will move a heavy load.

                  So hiring a "day worker" from the parking lot of Home Depot is better than nothing.

                  Dan
                  At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                  Location: SF East Bay.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by danlb View Post
                    So hiring a "day worker" from the parking lot of Home Depot is better than nothing.
                    I'm quite sure nothing is better than that. Less chance of someone driving backwards instead of forwards when the load is lifted off the back of the truck waiting for the truck to move out of the way.. Or less chance of the load slamming down as he quickly turns the jack release too fast... Less chance of someone noticing the ram bolt is bent and ready to give way...

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by lugnut View Post
                      Just a wild thought, if that column is a pipe or open all the way through, why not drop a chain down through it and put a bar or heave bolt through the bottom of the chain and lift using the chain?
                      I just said that in post#32,both mills I moved we're hollow all the way through this is no brainier on moving these things, no bent belt guard or damage to anything else.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by danlb View Post
                        I had that thought too. To clarify, if you are moving a 300# lump of steel and manage to get a hand trapped, you may be there a long time waiting for help. There are certain positions where you just don't have muscles that will move a heavy load.

                        So hiring a "day worker" from the parking lot of Home Depot is better than nothing.

                        Dan
                        This is Maine, we don't have day workers at Home Depot.

                        I'm going to get an engine hoist, rent or buy. Others helping on something like this could be more of a distraction. If it gets to the point where another body in the way makes a difference I'd rather not have another body in the way. Slow and steady - a good opportunity for a time lapse video.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by 01-7700 View Post
                          This is Maine, we don't have day workers at Home Depot.

                          I'm going to get an engine hoist, rent or buy. Others helping on something like this could be more of a distraction. If it gets to the point where another body in the way makes a difference I'd rather not have another body in the way. Slow and steady - a good opportunity for a time lapse video.
                          Agree, it's better to only have one person's hand stuck under the machine than two peoples hands screaming in each others ear and cancelling out the sound waves so nobody else hears the screams

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                          • #43
                            I had an H.F. Mill Drill for some ten years until I found a used knee mill. IIRC mine weighed something like 500#. It was a 2 hp model with 120 Volt input. I got it in the crate and used an overhead chain hoist with ropes under the head to lift it out of my truck and set it on its stand. Then I dragged it about ten feet into its place a little at a time.

                            When I sold it I reversed the process, only this time I used my engine hoist to load it into the buyer's vehicle. They aren't that difficult to move. An engine hoist is really helpful.

                            I used it to good advantage while I had it and make numerous projects on it. The only drawback was chattering on heavy cuts and the tendency to go out of tram when raising or lowering the head with the crank.

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                            • #44
                              I'm wondering how heavy that mill really is.... HF claims this one has a shipping weight of ~650lbs which is 100lbs less than the green one. This one also is 220v, has a knee, trammable head, etc... I'm wondering if if weight is really correct for the green item #33686

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                              • #45
                                I looked for the shipping doc but was not able to find it.

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