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Harbor Freight Mill Drill Moving

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  • #46
    The web page for 33686 says shipping weight is 749.36 lb.

    The manual for the machine says that the machine itself is about 660#.

    Dan
    At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

    Location: SF East Bay.

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    • #47
      I purchased a crane to move mine, then rented it out. Rentals have paid for the crane 5 times over, not including the machining jobs obtained from the renters. Make sure you get a deposit for the value of the crane or you may not get it back.

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      • #48
        I'd buy an engine hoist, it is my go to for moving anything heavy in my shop!







        Andy

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        • #49
          Originally posted by martik View Post
          I purchased a crane to move mine, then rented it out. Rentals have paid for the crane 5 times over, not including the machining jobs obtained from the renters. Make sure you get a deposit for the value of the crane or you may not get it back.
          That's a great idea if you're running a commercial shop of some sort. Freakin' brilliant actually. But not so great if it's a hobby shop situation. We don't get the walk in audience you would have...

          Vpt, you rigged up a conversion to turn your engine hoist into a drywall lift? That's freakin' brilliant as well ! ! ! ! ! Many kudos for dreaming that up! ! !
          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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          • #50
            Originally posted by BCRider View Post
            Vpt, you rigged up a conversion to turn your engine hoist into a drywall lift? That's freakin' brilliant as well ! ! ! ! ! Many kudos for dreaming that up! ! !
            Yea, that's a great idea!

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            • #51
              New 2 ton engine hoist and straps on the way.

              +1 on the drywall lift conversion - I just finished drywalling the ceiling in my shop, with no lift of course. How many times in my life have I bought the tool after I needed it?

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              • #52
                Thanks! Gotta work with what you have.
                Andy

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                • #53
                  A group of us had to lift up some panels so we rented a drywall lift from the local rental place. It worked SO well that I'd do it again in a jiffy if the need arose. Mind you the rental place is just down the road from me and the cost to rent one is only slightly more than the cost of the wood to build what you did vpt. If things were only SLIGHTLY different I'd steal your concept in a millisecond....
                  Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                  • #54
                    Update. I've been looking at the mill sitting in my garage and there's no hollow inside the column to lift it with. Still hoping for a hollow in the head casting in front of the column. I don't want to start dismantling until I'm closer to moving it.

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by 01-7700 View Post
                      Update. I've been looking at the mill sitting in my garage and there's no hollow inside the column to lift it with. Still hoping for a hollow in the head casting in front of the column. I don't want to start dismantling until I'm closer to moving it.
                      You got the mill delivered? If it's already in your garage, where are you moving it now? Or are you just lifting it? Post some pics!

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by 01-7700 View Post
                        Update. I've been looking at the mill sitting in my garage and there's no hollow inside the column to lift it with. Still hoping for a hollow in the head casting in front of the column. I don't want to start dismantling until I'm closer to moving it.
                        I noticed a common method for lifting lathes without breaking the protruding pieces. It might work for you.

                        The technique is to locate where the straps will be, then attach wooden blocks between the solid parts (such as the bed) in a way that they stand out further than the breakable parts. The straps ride against these blocks.

                        In your case, the wood blocks can be duct taped to the sides of the mill's head in such a way that the straps won't crush the plastic or sheetmetal bits. Then you can extend the straps down to an anchor point below the head.

                        Dan
                        At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                        Location: SF East Bay.

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                        • #57
                          When I moved mine I made a sling with thick nylon rope wrapped under the head, both in front and behind the column. Also place some 2x4's on the sides of the sheet metal top to spread the load and prevent the rope from digging into the sheet metal.

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                          • #58
                            Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
                            You got the mill delivered? If it's already in your garage, where are you moving it now? Or are you just lifting it? Post some pics!
                            Yes, I've had it for weeks. It's moving into a new sunroom/shop with my lathes once I get that ready.

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                            • #59
                              Drill a tap a hole in the top of the column and insert a forged eye to lift it and move it.
                              Andy

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                              • #60
                                Originally posted by vpt View Post
                                Drill a tap a hole in the top of the column and insert a forged eye to lift it and move it.
                                I dunno, the column cap seems very thin and I'm not too sure how it's attached to the column. It already has a center hole or depression that does not seem to be threaded but only 1/2" deep, and two other concentric holes that are drilled through. The material is too thin for me to trust lifting it that way - I'm guessing 1/8". The center hole may have a cap screw in it - hard to tell with all the grease on it.

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