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  • Help self holding tire inflating Chuck

    I am in charge of maintaining large tires daily I am looking for a self holding tire inflating chuck, that actually works every time or at least nine times out of 10. Every one that I have tried is junk and leaks and you have to hold it on there with your hand anyway. I am almost ready to go back to the old fashion screw on kind at least they did work.The tires that I fill are rather large and it is not fun crouching over for a minute or so filling these things up and holding the tire Chuck on. How hard can it be to make one of these things that actually works? Do I have to design and make it myself?Thank you. Edwin Dirnbeck


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by Edwin Dirnbeck; 10-19-2017, 10:15 AM.

  • #2
    I have one like your upper right and it works great. Had it for years, and no idea where I got it or who makes it, but I've never had a problem that I can remember. It looks identical to yours though. I also have one like your upper left, and while it does blow, it sucks at staying put. I also don't like how bulky it is, and it put too much sideways pressure on valve stems for my liking while leaking air the whole time.

    I do like the looks of the one on the bottom though, as I think that would be handy with about 4' of hose on a pistol grip trigger with a gauge. I'm gonna try and find one.

    I think the key to not leaking is cut to down the bulk and weight hanging off the valve stem. A chuck like the upper right, with a barb fitting and a 2-3' whip of air hose would cut down the bulk and weight of the whole contraption at the valve stem.

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    • #3
      maybe the slipping off is intentional after a certain psi...

      they are kinda dangerous when you think about it, someone puts one on and then gets distracted - Ka-boom, I see dead people,

      I do remember seeing the inside of one - the kind that has the thin steel engagement piece and it was actually sharp on one side and had a bevel on the other like a chisel except half round to engage in the V.stem threads,,,

      maybe yours is dull?

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      • #4
        This is a good one.. Looks "cheap" but it's actually stout

        https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01AO1ZBLW

        Comment


        • #5
          If you find the answer let me know.

          I remember back in the day some of the tire shops had clip ons that seemed to work. Back when shops would still work on split rims they would put them in the cage and then use a clip-on. I knew mobile service guys who would put a their truck between them and a split rim in the field and use a clipon with a remote valve. They looked just like the one you have on the top right. I have one from Harbor Freight and it just doesn't work. I have not found a Camel or Rema TipTop dealer in a number of years, but I expect you would have to go with one of those top quality old names to get a good one.

          I want one to go in my 4WD vehicles. Even with 4WD you can bury up in sugar sand if you don't go with a super wide tire or deflate the tires or on a heavier truck ... both. I've got a decent (it will fill four full size truck tires without burning up, LOL) little 12V compressor I keep in my truck, but it takes about 10-15 minutes to air a good size truck tire from sand pressure to road pressure. It came with a little plastic hose and a screw-on. Well, the plastic hose failed a long time ago and the screw on isn't really setup to be reattached.

          I'm thinking I might just make a screw on with a needle valve and a right angle adapter that I can put a standard male quick coupler on. It would have the advantage of being handy for deflating tires too with a light weight micro gage from McMaster on it. It would have to be gasket or o-ring sealed I think to work.

          I was reminded of this just recently during dove season when I managed to bury my truck out by Dateland. Had to drive ten miles to air up the tires because I still haven't fixed the air compressor situation.
          *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
            This is a good one.. Looks "cheap" but it's actually stout

            https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01AO1ZBLW

            Dang-it. I thought of those once before... and forgot. LOL. I think I have a foot pump around somewhere with one. Wonder if it will hold up to 80 PSI. I guess it should since some bicycle tires are filled to 60+.
            *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

            Comment


            • #7
              http://www.bowessealfast.com/p-1754-...xoC9B4QAvD_BwE

              This one used to be on a tire machine we had in our shop. Absolutely the best one I have used.
              Joe

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Joe Rogers View Post
                http://www.bowessealfast.com/p-1754-...xoC9B4QAvD_BwE

                This one used to be on a tire machine we had in our shop. Absolutely the best one I have used.
                Joe
                Yep. That's what has been on our old FMC machine for at least 26 years.

                Sent from my XT1080 using Tapatalk

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Joe Rogers View Post
                  http://www.bowessealfast.com/p-1754-...xoC9B4QAvD_BwE

                  This one used to be on a tire machine we had in our shop. Absolutely the best one I have used.
                  Joe
                  Yup, times two! These work very well.
                  Unlike the cheap ones posted in the OP that attempt to hold onto the valve stem by snagging only one side of the valve stem with a small piece of sheet metal. Those types are designed to fail.

                  Like AK mentioned though you HAVE to be VERY DILIGENT in not over-inflating a tire, your life literally depends on it.

                  My wife's uncle who is a great old guy that had his own fairly large machine shop almost had his life cut short ten years ago by not paying enough attention to filling a 10 ply trailer tire. It nearly took his head off when it let go at close range. His hearing is all but gone now even with thousands of dollars worth of hearing aids.
                  He was one hell of a machinist and fabricator and a very likable guy but his life is rather lonely and quiet now due to his hearing loss, can't believe how much of an impact this had on him.

                  Be careful guys!
                  Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                  Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                  Location: British Columbia

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Schrader makes some as well: https://www.schraderinternational.co...al2070111.ashx

                    What does with or without "retention" mean?

                    RWO

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Joe Rogers View Post
                      http://www.bowessealfast.com/p-1754-...xoC9B4QAvD_BwE

                      This one used to be on a tire machine we had in our shop. Absolutely the best one I have used.
                      Joe
                      I have a SIMILAR ONE ,but no good .It leaks. Maybe with the tire laying flat on a tire machine, it works better ,or maybe mine is a knockoff . Thanks, Edwin

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The blade fits into the threads right? So perhaps it's a case of twist the wrist strongly to the left then engage the chuck and give it a quarter to half turn to ride up on the thread as far as the clamping spring will allow. Otherwise some of the time the blade will "kick" to the next higher thread and leave you leaking.

                        Or the spring for the blade is too light?
                        Chilliwack BC, Canada

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I use the very nice JACO digital inflator - one of its chucks looks like the upper left one in your picture. Except that mine works perfectly every time.

                          Since you do a lot of tire inflation, you might be interested in this inflator at $38 - too much for a chuck, of course, but this is a nice tool.
                          https://www.amazon.com/JACO-FlowPro-...tor+with+gauge

                          -js
                          There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

                          Location: SF Bay Area

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post
                            If you find the answer let me know.

                            I remember back in the day some of the tire shops had clip ons that seemed to work. Back when shops would still work on split rims they would put them in the cage and then use a clip-on. I knew mobile service guys who would put a their truck between them and a split rim in the field and use a clipon with a remote valve. They looked just like the one you have on the top right. I have one from Harbor Freight and it just doesn't work. I have not found a Camel or Rema TipTop dealer in a number of years, but I expect you would have to go with one of those top quality old names to get a good one.

                            I want one to go in my 4WD vehicles. Even with 4WD you can bury up in sugar sand if you don't go with a super wide tire or deflate the tires or on a heavier truck ... both. I've got a decent (it will fill four full size truck tires without burning up, LOL) little 12V compressor I keep in my truck, but it takes about 10-15 minutes to air a good size truck tire from sand pressure to road pressure. It came with a little plastic hose and a screw-on. Well, the plastic hose failed a long time ago and the screw on isn't really setup to be reattached.

                            I'm thinking I might just make a screw on with a needle valve and a right angle adapter that I can put a standard male quick coupler on. It would have the advantage of being handy for deflating tires too with a light weight micro gage from McMaster on it. It would have to be gasket or o-ring sealed I think to work.

                            I was reminded of this just recently during dove season when I managed to bury my truck out by Dateland. Had to drive ten miles to air up the tires because I still haven't fixed the air compressor situation.
                            Used to have one that clipped on tight had a gauge & the other end of the hose screwed into a spark plug hole. Made a fine compressor. I think they may still make them. It pumped air but used the trucks compression to do it.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by flylo View Post
                              Used to have one that clipped on tight had a gauge & the other end of the hose screwed into a spark plug hole. Made a fine compressor. I think they may still make them. It pumped air but used the trucks compression to do it.
                              So you pulled out a plug (hopefully while the engine wasn't running), installed this and then re-started the engine using the remaining cylinders? That's a great way to fill an exploding tire with the perfect amount of air/fuel mixture Actually, the intake stroke would also draw from the spark plug hole so not sure how efficient that would be without some sort of check valve.

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