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  • #31
    Originally posted by epicfail48 View Post
    Fair point, but what if youre milling and then need to drill a hole? Admittedly, when i- err, my buddy, is holding a drill in a collet its because the previous action was picking up an edge, milling one side of a piece or some other task that a chuck isnt really appropriate for. Yes, it takes a little longer to change collets to center drill, pre-drill and ream a hole, but the extra time is still a lot less than the time it takes to change tool holders from the er collet chuck to the drill chuck.

    Thats what he says of course, i would never misuse my tooling like that. No siree, i always make all necessary changeovers to make sure that each operation is done with the proper method of toolholding!
    Get a Kurt or whatever power draw bar. I change tooling in seconds, dozens of times a day. I also have ER16, 20, 32 and 40. Mostly stays in the cabinet.

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    • #32
      Wow, some of you guys sure go to a lot of trouble to avoid buying a few collets. What's next, filing down the heads of metric bolts so you don't have to buy a set of metric wrenches? :-)

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Illinoyance View Post
        I have ER 32 collets in metric. I did add 1/4", 3/8", and 1/2" sizes. I couldn't get the metric collets to hold the end mills when hand tightening. I didn't have three hand to hold the tool, the spindle brake and the collet wrench all at the same time. By using those fractional sizes I can hand tighten the collet enough to hold the tool in place. 5/8" and 3/4" hold by hand tightening the collet. Once the tool is held in the collet I have two hands free to hold the spindle brake and the collet wrench.
        I just use the park brake function on my mill loosening or tightening works great.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
          Get a Kurt or whatever power draw bar. I change tooling in seconds, dozens of times a day. I also have ER16, 20, 32 and 40. Mostly stays in the cabinet.
          Alternately I can use the er collet any enjoy not spending twice the price if the mill on a power drawbar

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          • #35
            I have a qc30 spindle on my cnc mill which takes whatever collet system was cheapest secondhand as finding more in-spec qc30 gear at my cheapskate price is a difficult task at times, I leave a tool for its lifetime in its holder and after touching off its offset etc is programmed into the carousel in linuxcnc/the cam software and then it sits in a rack marked up with its ident number with its other 23 (so far) buddies. As soon as you take it out the holder to do anything to it, you have to go through touching it off and pumping the changed parameters back into the software toolchain. Some of the holders are ER which I have plenty of, some bristol erickson, some weldon flat etc, so when that size is in use, its locked out from the pool until I buy a second one that diameter, easy for ER, not so much for some of the more awkward ones.

            Then you have the ability to get things that are outside the range of your collet system to fit (think blacksmith style drill shanks, boring bars, rotary knife holders etc). Compounding that issue two of my machines which both have collet chucks with only a handful of bespoke collets and special order costing hundreds each for more, getting anything to fit in them has been a constant thorn in my side to be worked around.

            I'd love to be one of those guys with perfect machines that all take the same collet system and have perfect drawers of the collets with multiple spares just sat there for them but finances and circumstances have dictated against that so I'm always juggling things around.
            I'll bet there's other people with tooling picked up when the chance came up with various ER, 5c, WR, bernerd, bristol erickson, clarkeson autolock, and some oddball collet systems they can't even find in the listings. Collets are a pain, but once you've got into using them, and sort things out so the whole job fits the same system (or you have multiple holders that do) things just run straighter, easier etc.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by MrFluffy View Post
              Collets are a pain, but once you've got into using them, and sort things out so the whole job fits the same system (or you have multiple holders that do) things just run straighter, easier etc.
              ...and gone are the days of filing burrs off drill shanks so they'll go back in their index.
              Milton

              "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

              "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

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              • #37
                I chuckled when I read tomato coupes #32 post.
                At the museum we have some Saunders Roe (better known for flying boats) Skeeters from the 50's, powered by a 4 cylinder fuel injected 210hp Gypsy Major engine. The engine design is French, so all the threads are metric.
                Penny pinching by the Ministry of Defence ensured that the heads of all the fasteners were Whitworth, to save buying metric spanners.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by epicfail48 View Post
                  Alternately I can use the er collet any enjoy not spending twice the price if the mill on a power drawbar
                  Alternatively you could build one for less than $100.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
                    Alternatively you could build one for less than $100.
                    +1 Mine, is loosley based on the one depicted on "Toms Techniques" Youtube channel, consists of a cheap butterfly air wrench, a chunk of alu some scrapbox steel and two home made springs cost around £20 all in.

                    Paul

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